Stage 3 Kidney Disease and Diet: What can I eat?

Posted by carnes @carnes, Jun 11, 2018

It seems there is very little you can eat that is healthy for the Kidneys. The web site Davida has plenty of food on it but contradicts what other sources say. Anyone know anything for breakfast, lunch and dinner that does not have any sugar or flour bodies the obvious boring or bland foods good for Kidneys and I’m allergic to sugar of any kind of sweetener and flour. Thank you.

@crazyelf

My husband's kidneys are funtioning at37%. We found out the day his Kidneys was functioning at 37% in Jun that they had been at 31% in Dec. 2018. VA didn't say anything about him being at 31% which is almost at stage 4. So I have been trying to find a good diet for him. He loves his salt. So its very hard to keep that away from him. Plus Potassium. I let him once a week have whatever he wants. He has proteins in his urine. He's had 2 UTIs in 6 months time. VA clinic don't know how to read the Lab Reports. First UTI landed him in the hospital. Second one I found out and took him to an Urologist. Wednesday he has an lazor surgery on his Prostate. For 9 years he has been asking for the VA to check his Prostate. All they do is Medicate any problem but never tried to cure anything.
They won't let him go outside for anything. They have funds for the Outside (Choice Program) but its always broke fur to they use the funds for Bonuses, Raises and Promotions. Obama used it when he first got it up and running to help the Refugees and Illegals.
I have been trying to do my best to find a good diet. They all contradict each other. You can't really do it alone. You need a dietitian or a nutritionist. The VA didn't recommend one and we didn't know anything about it until recently. He doesn't have another appointment until Dec. 5/2019. With kidney disease and UTIs go hand and hand. You need to be seen every 3 months. Not 6-7 months.

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@crazyelf Welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect, we're glad you found us! We are not medical professionals, and cannot diagnose, but can offer our experience and support to help you along the way! Is your husband of age for Medicare? If so, any reason why he cannot then go to a dr of his choice? Managing a proper diet with CKD is critical, and at 37% you should be watching everything. Going to the following websites may help with diet, recipes, and information
http://www.davita.com [Davita, one of two main dialysis organizations]
http://www.kidney.org [National Kidney Foundation]
http://www.rsnhope.org [Renal Support Network, an international organization]
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/chronic-kidney-disease/symptoms-causes/syc-20354521 [from Mayo Clinic]

Just as an aside. Both my husband and I have kidney disease. He received a transplant Oct 2016. I am at 32% right now. But we are each responsible for our health. Your husband has to be on board with managing his own health.

Please check back in with us and let us know how things go. Will you do that? We care here at Mayo Connect.
Ginger

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@crazyelf

My husband's kidneys are funtioning at37%. We found out the day his Kidneys was functioning at 37% in Jun that they had been at 31% in Dec. 2018. VA didn't say anything about him being at 31% which is almost at stage 4. So I have been trying to find a good diet for him. He loves his salt. So its very hard to keep that away from him. Plus Potassium. I let him once a week have whatever he wants. He has proteins in his urine. He's had 2 UTIs in 6 months time. VA clinic don't know how to read the Lab Reports. First UTI landed him in the hospital. Second one I found out and took him to an Urologist. Wednesday he has an lazor surgery on his Prostate. For 9 years he has been asking for the VA to check his Prostate. All they do is Medicate any problem but never tried to cure anything.
They won't let him go outside for anything. They have funds for the Outside (Choice Program) but its always broke fur to they use the funds for Bonuses, Raises and Promotions. Obama used it when he first got it up and running to help the Refugees and Illegals.
I have been trying to do my best to find a good diet. They all contradict each other. You can't really do it alone. You need a dietitian or a nutritionist. The VA didn't recommend one and we didn't know anything about it until recently. He doesn't have another appointment until Dec. 5/2019. With kidney disease and UTIs go hand and hand. You need to be seen every 3 months. Not 6-7 months.

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Crazyelf: living with someone who loves their salt and almost a Stage 4 you have a rough road ahead of you. Twenty years ago when I was given the news that I was at stage 4, I knew I had to do something. Beef is Not a friend of anyone's kidneys. I went on a vegetarian diet and was able to stay off dialysis for 3 years. I had a transplant 11-1/2 years ago, I have found that the best way now to keep my kidney happy is the vegetarian diet (Life Style).

Unfortunately, the VA never dreamed of what life would be like for their vets after they left the service. They never planned ahead so our vets are not getting the medical treatment they should be getting. Getting a doctor that knows anything about kidneys is very hard.

The following is my opinion and mine alone: Someone needs to sit down with your husband and find out what he wants for the next 5+ years. Then you will have a better idea what to do. If he wants to do as he is doing, you may want to get a lawyer and write a Will. If he wants to live a long and happy life, the two of you, as well as your family and friends, will have to be willing to make some, Life Style, changes together.

Good Luck, mlmcg

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@mlmcg

Crazyelf: living with someone who loves their salt and almost a Stage 4 you have a rough road ahead of you. Twenty years ago when I was given the news that I was at stage 4, I knew I had to do something. Beef is Not a friend of anyone's kidneys. I went on a vegetarian diet and was able to stay off dialysis for 3 years. I had a transplant 11-1/2 years ago, I have found that the best way now to keep my kidney happy is the vegetarian diet (Life Style).

Unfortunately, the VA never dreamed of what life would be like for their vets after they left the service. They never planned ahead so our vets are not getting the medical treatment they should be getting. Getting a doctor that knows anything about kidneys is very hard.

The following is my opinion and mine alone: Someone needs to sit down with your husband and find out what he wants for the next 5+ years. Then you will have a better idea what to do. If he wants to do as he is doing, you may want to get a lawyer and write a Will. If he wants to live a long and happy life, the two of you, as well as your family and friends, will have to be willing to make some, Life Style, changes together.

Good Luck, mlmcg

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Thanks for dropping in with the valuable message that we have be our own advocates. And, I'll add that no matter what the situation, it is better when we have our families or loved oned to support us.

How are you getting along?

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@rosemarya

Thanks for dropping in with the valuable message that we have be our own advocates. And, I'll add that no matter what the situation, it is better when we have our families or loved oned to support us.

How are you getting along?

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My kidney is hanging in there, in spite of the fact that it lived through two ostomy surgeries, one temporary and one permanent, and two strokes. When I was discharged from the hospital, after 4 months, the doctors did not know if I would need Hospice or Palliative Care. I spent 100 days in rehab, when I got home I was on my own, which is what I wanted. I have a wonderful support group, gave up driving because of the strokes, I am happy and want to help those I can. Thank you for asking.
mlmcg

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@mlmcg

Crazyelf: living with someone who loves their salt and almost a Stage 4 you have a rough road ahead of you. Twenty years ago when I was given the news that I was at stage 4, I knew I had to do something. Beef is Not a friend of anyone's kidneys. I went on a vegetarian diet and was able to stay off dialysis for 3 years. I had a transplant 11-1/2 years ago, I have found that the best way now to keep my kidney happy is the vegetarian diet (Life Style).

Unfortunately, the VA never dreamed of what life would be like for their vets after they left the service. They never planned ahead so our vets are not getting the medical treatment they should be getting. Getting a doctor that knows anything about kidneys is very hard.

The following is my opinion and mine alone: Someone needs to sit down with your husband and find out what he wants for the next 5+ years. Then you will have a better idea what to do. If he wants to do as he is doing, you may want to get a lawyer and write a Will. If he wants to live a long and happy life, the two of you, as well as your family and friends, will have to be willing to make some, Life Style, changes together.

Good Luck, mlmcg

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@mlmcg Your last paragraph packs quite the message, and one that many should read and think about. It's not easy to do, and look at the bigger picture. Thank you for pointing out a path to take. So glad to hear you are doing well!
Ginger

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@crazyelf It has been awhile since we have heard from you. How are you and your husband doing with his kidney challenges, and finding good medical care? Have you found any of the recipes that @kamama94 posted in her online source to be helpful to you? Are there any tips you have for us who have a family member with kidney issues and contrary medical professionals, that you can share?
Ginger

Liked by kamama94

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@teachaero Checking in with you to find out how your nephrology appointment went? Were you able to get any answers to your concerns for being a Stage 3 kidney disease patient? I was impressed to read you are teaching spin classes, which takes a lot of stamina! How have you changed your lifestyle since we last heard from you?
Ginger

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@kamama94

@teachaero, both my pcp and neph tell me as we age it's normal for GFR to decrease. IDK how old you are but I'd give the Skrat from Ice Age a delectable acorn if my GFR was 60 instead of 33 at age 74!

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@kamama94, I have not seen your name on posts recently, and I want to drop in for a minute and check on you. Last time I heard from you, you were experencing some changes in your GFR. I know how carefully you have monitored everything that you eat to maintain your kidneys. Have you and your doctors figured what is going on? And is there any solution for you other than dialysis which you have delayed. with great success? If you have a free moment for a cup of coffee or tea, I would enjoy hearing from you.

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@rosemarya

@kamama94, I have not seen your name on posts recently, and I want to drop in for a minute and check on you. Last time I heard from you, you were experencing some changes in your GFR. I know how carefully you have monitored everything that you eat to maintain your kidneys. Have you and your doctors figured what is going on? And is there any solution for you other than dialysis which you have delayed. with great success? If you have a free moment for a cup of coffee or tea, I would enjoy hearing from you.

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@rosemarya, hello! Thanks for inquiring. Things have seemed fairly stable for the past couple of months. Labs are good, relatively speaking, and no need yet for a graft or access for dialysis since neph thinks it won't be necessary for awhile yet. Will know more when labs are drawn again at the end of this month. Pedal edema is slightly worse but we think that's more due to CHF than CKD and Coreg, support/compression stockings and elevating my feet a couple of times a day have helped to keep the edema from increasing even more

Have been quite busy this summer working on renal diets. Here's the latest I sent my docs for them to share as they see fit:

As you know, I rely on the NIH and the USDA as well as other sources for nutrient value assays. I do trust those values more than others and I trust my own research.. So I've concluded that at least SOME dietary recommendations/restrictions for renal patients are inaccurate.

For instance, many websites and kidney diet groups (some of which are affiliated with dialysis companies, go figure) tell patients to AVOID tomatoes, green peppers (but not red ones,) pumpkin and other hard-shelled squashes, as well as beans, etc. But many tomato varieties do NOT contain unreasonable amounts of the no-no minerals; values are so low for, say, one small Roma tomato, it barely moves the needle on a 1000 to 1500 mg daily potassium limit. Perhaps the recommendations of avoidance are faulty?

Furthermore, green peppers have nearly identical nutrient values to red ones! Green peppers are just that: green, as in not ripe. Red ones are merely ripe green ones with slightly more sugar content due to the ripening. Neither needs to be avoided completely. In fact, the no-no values are so low that bell or sweet peppers can be chopped or sliced and small amounts added to almost any dish for extra body and flavor.

Pumpkin and all other squashes, especially hard-shelled, are relatively high in potassium. Should they therefore be forbidden? Absolutely not! A cup of no-salt added pureed pumpkin is 16 tablespoons. Instead of using an entire cup, use 1/4 cup instead. You still get the function of binding and get healthy nutrients without excessive amounts of minerals kidney patients need to restrict. And if a renal cook measures carefully and uses maple sugar instead of refined sugar, egg whites and/or applesauce for less or no actual egg, almond or coconut milk sparingly instead of dairy milk, pumpkin pie is allowable on a flour/water/healthy oil crust IN SMALL PORTIONS.

Beans are high in phosphorus and potassium. Chickpeas are lower in those and 9 pecan halves are even lower. So are green beans. Therefore if I want meatless chili with beans, I can use an eighth of the amount of kidney beans the recipe calls for, a small number of chickpeas account for another eighth, 9 coarsely chopped pecan halves constitute another eighth, and no salt added green beans five eighths. Add half the amount of tomato sauce required, extend its volume with pureed green (or red) bell pepper, add spices, and sit down to a pretty tasty bowl of chili "analog."

Rosemary, I'm also working on a list of processed foods which actually are ok on a renal diet if one eats half-servings. Flavor often is as important as if not more important than portion size.

My work constitutes suggestions only and anyone using my information is free to do so as long as it's understood that I'm not a registered dietitian, just a very good cook with a background in physics and chemistry and good at math. In other words, I do not diagnose or prescribe, I merely share what has worked for me so far.

With this in mind, when my latest 2 diet papers have been edited and vetted, I'll be glad to share them here.

Peace and blessings to you and to all in the groups!

REPLY
@kamama94

@rosemarya, hello! Thanks for inquiring. Things have seemed fairly stable for the past couple of months. Labs are good, relatively speaking, and no need yet for a graft or access for dialysis since neph thinks it won't be necessary for awhile yet. Will know more when labs are drawn again at the end of this month. Pedal edema is slightly worse but we think that's more due to CHF than CKD and Coreg, support/compression stockings and elevating my feet a couple of times a day have helped to keep the edema from increasing even more

Have been quite busy this summer working on renal diets. Here's the latest I sent my docs for them to share as they see fit:

As you know, I rely on the NIH and the USDA as well as other sources for nutrient value assays. I do trust those values more than others and I trust my own research.. So I've concluded that at least SOME dietary recommendations/restrictions for renal patients are inaccurate.

For instance, many websites and kidney diet groups (some of which are affiliated with dialysis companies, go figure) tell patients to AVOID tomatoes, green peppers (but not red ones,) pumpkin and other hard-shelled squashes, as well as beans, etc. But many tomato varieties do NOT contain unreasonable amounts of the no-no minerals; values are so low for, say, one small Roma tomato, it barely moves the needle on a 1000 to 1500 mg daily potassium limit. Perhaps the recommendations of avoidance are faulty?

Furthermore, green peppers have nearly identical nutrient values to red ones! Green peppers are just that: green, as in not ripe. Red ones are merely ripe green ones with slightly more sugar content due to the ripening. Neither needs to be avoided completely. In fact, the no-no values are so low that bell or sweet peppers can be chopped or sliced and small amounts added to almost any dish for extra body and flavor.

Pumpkin and all other squashes, especially hard-shelled, are relatively high in potassium. Should they therefore be forbidden? Absolutely not! A cup of no-salt added pureed pumpkin is 16 tablespoons. Instead of using an entire cup, use 1/4 cup instead. You still get the function of binding and get healthy nutrients without excessive amounts of minerals kidney patients need to restrict. And if a renal cook measures carefully and uses maple sugar instead of refined sugar, egg whites and/or applesauce for less or no actual egg, almond or coconut milk sparingly instead of dairy milk, pumpkin pie is allowable on a flour/water/healthy oil crust IN SMALL PORTIONS.

Beans are high in phosphorus and potassium. Chickpeas are lower in those and 9 pecan halves are even lower. So are green beans. Therefore if I want meatless chili with beans, I can use an eighth of the amount of kidney beans the recipe calls for, a small number of chickpeas account for another eighth, 9 coarsely chopped pecan halves constitute another eighth, and no salt added green beans five eighths. Add half the amount of tomato sauce required, extend its volume with pureed green (or red) bell pepper, add spices, and sit down to a pretty tasty bowl of chili "analog."

Rosemary, I'm also working on a list of processed foods which actually are ok on a renal diet if one eats half-servings. Flavor often is as important as if not more important than portion size.

My work constitutes suggestions only and anyone using my information is free to do so as long as it's understood that I'm not a registered dietitian, just a very good cook with a background in physics and chemistry and good at math. In other words, I do not diagnose or prescribe, I merely share what has worked for me so far.

With this in mind, when my latest 2 diet papers have been edited and vetted, I'll be glad to share them here.

Peace and blessings to you and to all in the groups!

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@kamama94 Wow! You have been busy! Great news based on your experimentation, especially as we head in the holiday season!
Ginger

Liked by cehunt57, kamama94

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@gingerw. thanks for the kind words. As I've aged and since I have certain chronic conditions, I've had to stop oil painting, playing the piano, crocheting. . . But since the landlord upgraded my kitchen to be totally wheelchair friendly, I can cook. Even those friends and neighbors who are meat-eaters or who aren't on special diets seem to like many of the vegan or vegetarian kidney-and-diabetic-friendly dishes I prepare and it's a nice creative outlet for me. I can't wait to share more of what I'm learning about tastes and herbs and spices and substitutes, etc. Oh, if I only had my old wood cookstove back and a nice kid or two to keep me supplied with kindling, LOL!

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Very good new website with easy-to-read nutrient values for all kinds of foods, cooked or raw, from USDA: https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/index.html

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@kamama94

@rosemarya, hello! Thanks for inquiring. Things have seemed fairly stable for the past couple of months. Labs are good, relatively speaking, and no need yet for a graft or access for dialysis since neph thinks it won't be necessary for awhile yet. Will know more when labs are drawn again at the end of this month. Pedal edema is slightly worse but we think that's more due to CHF than CKD and Coreg, support/compression stockings and elevating my feet a couple of times a day have helped to keep the edema from increasing even more

Have been quite busy this summer working on renal diets. Here's the latest I sent my docs for them to share as they see fit:

As you know, I rely on the NIH and the USDA as well as other sources for nutrient value assays. I do trust those values more than others and I trust my own research.. So I've concluded that at least SOME dietary recommendations/restrictions for renal patients are inaccurate.

For instance, many websites and kidney diet groups (some of which are affiliated with dialysis companies, go figure) tell patients to AVOID tomatoes, green peppers (but not red ones,) pumpkin and other hard-shelled squashes, as well as beans, etc. But many tomato varieties do NOT contain unreasonable amounts of the no-no minerals; values are so low for, say, one small Roma tomato, it barely moves the needle on a 1000 to 1500 mg daily potassium limit. Perhaps the recommendations of avoidance are faulty?

Furthermore, green peppers have nearly identical nutrient values to red ones! Green peppers are just that: green, as in not ripe. Red ones are merely ripe green ones with slightly more sugar content due to the ripening. Neither needs to be avoided completely. In fact, the no-no values are so low that bell or sweet peppers can be chopped or sliced and small amounts added to almost any dish for extra body and flavor.

Pumpkin and all other squashes, especially hard-shelled, are relatively high in potassium. Should they therefore be forbidden? Absolutely not! A cup of no-salt added pureed pumpkin is 16 tablespoons. Instead of using an entire cup, use 1/4 cup instead. You still get the function of binding and get healthy nutrients without excessive amounts of minerals kidney patients need to restrict. And if a renal cook measures carefully and uses maple sugar instead of refined sugar, egg whites and/or applesauce for less or no actual egg, almond or coconut milk sparingly instead of dairy milk, pumpkin pie is allowable on a flour/water/healthy oil crust IN SMALL PORTIONS.

Beans are high in phosphorus and potassium. Chickpeas are lower in those and 9 pecan halves are even lower. So are green beans. Therefore if I want meatless chili with beans, I can use an eighth of the amount of kidney beans the recipe calls for, a small number of chickpeas account for another eighth, 9 coarsely chopped pecan halves constitute another eighth, and no salt added green beans five eighths. Add half the amount of tomato sauce required, extend its volume with pureed green (or red) bell pepper, add spices, and sit down to a pretty tasty bowl of chili "analog."

Rosemary, I'm also working on a list of processed foods which actually are ok on a renal diet if one eats half-servings. Flavor often is as important as if not more important than portion size.

My work constitutes suggestions only and anyone using my information is free to do so as long as it's understood that I'm not a registered dietitian, just a very good cook with a background in physics and chemistry and good at math. In other words, I do not diagnose or prescribe, I merely share what has worked for me so far.

With this in mind, when my latest 2 diet papers have been edited and vetted, I'll be glad to share them here.

Peace and blessings to you and to all in the groups!

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@kamama94 I am so impressed with all the research you have done in learning about the nutritive values of so many different forms of produce! You are definitely a valuable resource for people with those needs, and I am sure many are quite appreciative of all you have done.
JK

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@contentandwell

@kamama94 I am so impressed with all the research you have done in learning about the nutritive values of so many different forms of produce! You are definitely a valuable resource for people with those needs, and I am sure many are quite appreciative of all you have done.
JK

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@contentandwell Thanks. I am truly enjoying doing this. There are new discoveries all the time and as soon as it's edited and vetted I'd like to post a list of foods CKD patients are told to avoid but actually can be eaten on a limited basis. There also are some processed foods which aren't as unhealthy as some would have us believe – little or no hidden phosphorus or potassium or sodium. Peace and blessings to you and everyone!

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@kamama94

@contentandwell Thanks. I am truly enjoying doing this. There are new discoveries all the time and as soon as it's edited and vetted I'd like to post a list of foods CKD patients are told to avoid but actually can be eaten on a limited basis. There also are some processed foods which aren't as unhealthy as some would have us believe – little or no hidden phosphorus or potassium or sodium. Peace and blessings to you and everyone!

Jump to this post

@kamama94 Can this be published commercially at some point? Your efforts have been enormous, if you could get some payment for them it would be great, you deserve some compensation.
As I always told my kids, if you find something you love to do you will never “work” a day in your life, and your enjoyment for what you are doing shows.
Having restrictions because I am post-transplant has similarities to what you say about some foods really not being a problem unless, and that’s a big unless, you overdo it, but it is easier to just prohibit those things than to say in limited amounts. Even the prohibition on alcohol is not really necessary from what I have read, it does not affect the immunosuppressants, but alcohol is not good for anyone’s liver so it is prohibited. I abide by what I am told of course. I am just grateful to be alive so I will do as I’m told.
JK

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