New Study on Post-COVID Syndrome

Apr 27 5:19pm | Greg Vanichkachorn, M.D., M.P.H. | @drvan | Comments (11)

As we learn more about Post COVID Syndrome and Post-Acute Sequelae of SARS-COV2, there are growing concerns that the symptoms patients are experiencing are due to a neurological problem. Headache, dizziness, rapid heart rate, muscle, and chest pain; all of these could be related to how the nerves in our body are functioning.  Specifically, there have been reports of autonomic dysfunction.

The autonomic nervous system is what controls all the things in our body that we aren’t normally thinking about, like our pulse and intestine movement. To understand this better, researchers at Mayo Clinic looked at the patients we have seen for PASC and PCS to see if there are any indications of autonomic dysfunction, and the results of this analysis were recently published.

 

27 patients showed signs of possible autonomic dysfunction between March 2020 and January 2021.  The most common symptom was lightheadedness and headache.  Some patients also experienced sweating, burning pain, and syncope (passing out). On testing, one fifth of patients met criteria for a diagnosis of postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS), a specific form of autonomic dysfunction. Other abnormalities were found less frequently, including worsening of preexisting orthostatic hypotension (dizziness on standing) and small fiber neuropathy (causes diffuse pain).

 

Overall, our study shows that patients with PSC or PASC can have symptoms from autonomic dysfunction, and that these problems are sometimes detected on testing. While this finding is not enough to say that COVID-19 infection causes autonomic nerve problems, it emphasizes the need for more research in this area and for patients to report such symptoms to their providers.

 

Stay tuned to our Research page as we learn more about Post-COVID Syndrome and PASC. Discuss this study and more in the discussion group.

Could gastroparesis be a result of vaccination of Moderna?

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@jb9

Could gastroparesis be a result of vaccination of Moderna?

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Hi JB, welcome. I have not heard of gastrointestinal issues being linked to the COVID-19 vaccine. Is this a new diagnosis for you?

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A condition that has gone on for awhile since the vaccinations just wondered if others had it.. No more reply necessary as you haven't heard of it. Thanks

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I had Covid 19 by end november 2020 practically without symptoms.
Since january I am having heartpalpitations.
Could be possible that is POST COVID SYNDROME?
I have a coronary heart disease

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I contracted covid back in early November. Since then I've experienced pots like symptoms but what's concerning me now are my segs or white blood cell count are very low, 30 and my eosinophil % is 18. Possibly auto immune? I get terrible pain in the soles of my feet upon standing for only a couple hours. Feels like walking on bruises. I haven't been able to work my warehousing job because the pain is so debilitating. I can see the hematologist until 5/18. I never had any of these symptoms precovid.

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I have not had Covid, I’ve received both Moderna shots, and I tested negative after a possible exposure. My question is: If I am exposed to Covid and have no symptoms, could I still get post Covid syndrome? Does the vaccine protect against PCS? Are vaccinated people getting PCS?
Thank you, mayomary

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I had One JJ vaccine, major headaches and swelling, developed bladder infection, over a month and still have swelling, going to doctor

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@abelmarcelo, that is a very good question. Since you have a pre-existing heart condition, you'll want to keep an eye on new developments such as heart palpitations and talk to your doctor. Have you mentioned this change and your concern about post-COVID symptoms to your cardiologist?

@stoneydintheloo, I'm glad that you have an appointment to see a specialist later this month. As you wait for your appointment, I might suggest that you keep a journal of your symptoms, when they happen and what else you were doing at the time (possible triggers). Have you had these symptoms since being infected with COVID-19?

@mayomary, it is my understanding that you cannot get post-COVID syndrome if you have not been infected with the COVID virus and you test negative. Now that you have had both shots of the Moderna vaccine you are 95% protected against the infection. Continuing to wash your hands frequently and wear a mask and distance when in public spaces will continue to protect you.

@brasileira, I'm glad you are going to see your doctor regarding your possible reaction to the vaccine. Your symptoms may be related to the vaccine or some other cause that needs to be investigated. Do you often get bladder infections?

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@brasileira

I had One JJ vaccine, major headaches and swelling, developed bladder infection, over a month and still have swelling, going to doctor

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No previous infections. I have a great doctor, she gave antibiotics, but some swelling is still happening? ??

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I didn't have any of the symptoms I mentioned prior to my covid infection. Keeping a journal of my symptoms is a good idea. I don't really notice my chronic pain symptoms unless I'm actively working. I'm currently on a leave of abscense until I can learn what's causing my chronic foot and joint pain. I have an appointment with a podiatrist may 6th, but I feel like my foot along with my joint pain has a neurological connection or something that's increasing my inflammation. I work a very active job in warehousing that consists of 15 miles of fast paced walking along with lifting and stacking 2 to 3k boxes, many as heavy as 50lbs or more. Before covid i could do this job without issue. Since covid it's been 8 to 10 hours of suffering. I love being active and don't want to return to a lower paying desk job so I'm hoping to get answers from this group along with various Facebook covid long hauler groups I'm a member of. I hope my hematologist will also provide some answers as most of what I've learned is purely anecdotal.

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@stoneydintheloo

I didn't have any of the symptoms I mentioned prior to my covid infection. Keeping a journal of my symptoms is a good idea. I don't really notice my chronic pain symptoms unless I'm actively working. I'm currently on a leave of abscense until I can learn what's causing my chronic foot and joint pain. I have an appointment with a podiatrist may 6th, but I feel like my foot along with my joint pain has a neurological connection or something that's increasing my inflammation. I work a very active job in warehousing that consists of 15 miles of fast paced walking along with lifting and stacking 2 to 3k boxes, many as heavy as 50lbs or more. Before covid i could do this job without issue. Since covid it's been 8 to 10 hours of suffering. I love being active and don't want to return to a lower paying desk job so I'm hoping to get answers from this group along with various Facebook covid long hauler groups I'm a member of. I hope my hematologist will also provide some answers as most of what I've learned is purely anecdotal.

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Hello @stoneydintheloo and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. As @colleenyoung mentioned, keeping a journal can be so helpful when tracking symptoms and changes. I am sorry to hear of the way this has affected you and your ability to do your job.

How have you been coping with the pain during your shift?

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