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retiredteacher
@retiredteacher

Posts: 58
Joined: May 10, 2017

What to eat when the right food isn't available (Hurricane Irma)?

Posted by @retiredteacher, Tue, Sep 12 9:58am

I have eaten wrong foods and spiked my blood with one meal on some occasions, but when there is a disaster and electricity is out, the only food that keeps is canned. Several days of peanut butter, canned meat, chips, crackers, cheese, and those types of things that are not on the list of the Diabetes Diet are all that is edible.
We’ve had to eat “wrong” for two days and my blood is up, up. If I don’t eat, it spikes, and if I eat the wrong foods it spikes. A disaster causes problems for diabetics and others who are supposed to avoid canned foods. No way to get to a grocery; no electricity, just all the wrong things.
Any suggestions?

retiredteacher

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Lisa Lucier, Connect Moderator
@lisalucier

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Joined: May 10, 2017
Posted by @lisalucier, Tue, Sep 12 11:50am

Hi, @retiredteacher. That certainly is a unique situation for trying to eat the right foods for the diabetes diet. I’m so sorry you have been affected by the hurricane and that there is no way to get to a grocery and no electricity. Can’t imagine. A few members here who might have some thoughts for you, some of whom I believe you’ve encountered before, would be @kbart , @ihatediabetes, @gailb, @brendisha79 and @maurtura. @kdubois and @hopeful33250, two of our volunteer mentors who have some endocrine-related experiences, may also have some input.

How are you feeling?


Teresa, Volunteer Mentor
@hopeful33250

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Joined: Mar 28, 2016
Posted by @hopeful33250, Tue, Sep 12 1:38pm

Hello @retiredteacher

I am so sorry to hear that you’ve been affected by the bad storms, how terrible!

Your question is good, however, for all folks who find themselves without power and have special dietary needs. As I read your post, I was thinking about storing some baby food products – not the most tasty, but they are generally higher in protein and without a lot of sugar or salt. Also, liquid nutrition products – I know there are some that are specifically for diabetics.

I’ll be looking forward to seeing other suggestions from our Members. I hope that your power is restored soon!

Teresa


retiredteacher
@retiredteacher

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Joined: May 10, 2017
Posted by @retiredteacher, Tue, Sep 12 3:35pm

Thanks Teresa. I didn’t think of baby food. I may look at the numbers on a jar and see. Maybe it tastes better than it used to, but I haven’t been around it in so long that if it’s as bad as it used to be, I’m not sure I could swallow it. I know my husband would never eat it. He’ll eat snacks and sandwiches.
I’ll choose a jar the next time I grocery shop and try it to see how it tastes.

I appreciate the suggestion. I’m sure there are many people in this situation.

retiredteacher


Teresa, Volunteer Mentor
@hopeful33250

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Joined: Mar 28, 2016
Posted by @hopeful33250, Tue, Sep 12 4:22pm

@retiredteacher The Junior foods are better than the infant jars – a bit more grown-up in taste, but still lower in salt and sugar than the regular adult food. The Junior foods also have more variety. I had my first surgery of the upper digestive tract days before the big black-out that covered a lot of the East coast and the day I got out of the hospital there was still no power – so the Junior foods were my go-to.

Teresa


retiredteacher
@retiredteacher

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Posted by @retiredteacher, Tue, Sep 12 5:26pm

You can tell I don’t know anything about buying baby food. 🙂 I will check out the inventory and see about the junior choices. I didn’t know they had junior choices. But, that sounds better than baby. Thanks for that information. I haven’t been around a baby for decades, so I definitely don’t know about that grocery aisle. I’ll give it a try.

retiredteacher


contentandwell
@contentandwell

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Posted by @contentandwell, Tue, Sep 12 10:58pm

@retiredteacher Sorry to hear you were effected by the hurricane. For some reason, knowing that you live out of town in a rural area, I had envisioned you living in the west, like Idaho, Montana, Colorado or whatever!
You mention not being able to eat numerous things “peanut butter, canned meat, chips, crackers, cheese, and those types of things that are not on the list of the Diabetes Diet are all that is edible”. No one ever told me that! I eat peanut butter often, cheese, and canned tuna occasionally. There are very low salt brands of tuna now. I sometimes do add mayo to tuna but I also just put chunks of it on top of a salad.
Someone mentioned the nutritional beverages made for diabetics and I do keep those on hand. They make a good, quick breakfast. I will generally throw a can of it into my blender type of machine and often add some strawberries or blueberries to it. It’s not bad, I find the vanilla easier to drink in the morning. I love chocolate but not crazy about it in this type of beverage and as far as the other flavors go, I think most of them have a very artificial taste.
JK


dolo
@dolo

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Posted by @dolo, Wed, Sep 13 11:57am

I also regularly eat peanut butter, canned tuna and cheese. I pretty much eat anything that is low in carbs or sugar. Mostly I eat salads and vegetables, healthy proteins. Once again, it seems we all are different in the food category too.


contentandwell
@contentandwell

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Posted by @contentandwell, Wed, Sep 13 9:24pm

@dolo It sounds as if you and I are pretty much on the same food trends. I don’t do too much cheese, despite loving it, because it does tend to be high in sodium. I have gotten into putting goat cheese crumbles on my salads because it has about half the sodium of regular cheeses. My favorite is blue cheese but that’s even higher in sodium.
JK


dolo
@dolo

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Posted by @dolo, Thu, Sep 14 4:42pm

@contentandwell I like blue cheese crumbles on my salad. I try low sodium when I can, but sometimes I just need flavor so I can stick to other requirements. I do think there are choices we can enjoy and be healthy, just occasionally and in moderation like all things in life. I make it a choice to be stronger than my diabetes and if I can feel that way, most of the time, I am doing fine!


retiredteacher
@retiredteacher

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Posted by @retiredteacher, Wed, Sep 13 8:22am

It’s funny the way we picture people we know only by a forum or blog name. I was born and raised in the deep South. As we say, “American by birth and Southern by the grace of God.” That’s the way I feel and at my age, I am a Steel Magnolia to the bone. I do live in a rural area because I do not like people crammed in by other people. I enjoy nature, forests, rivers and such. There are drawbacks, as you mentioned: not having massive numbers of specialists and medical facilities to choose from, but that’s a small price to pay. I avoid doctors and hospitals because I’ve never been sickly, so I never thought it would be important. And, at my age, I’m not interested in anyone running tests that may or may not be necessary or prescribing meds to fatten their purses and Big Pharmas. I researched foods for emergencies and that’s where peanut butter, crackers, and non perishables that I mentioned came from. The problem is the salt and of course, carbs and anything used to preserve. I don’t eat fish: just a personal aversion of mine. We have electricity now, so a trip to the grocery is necessary, although since there is only one and it’s small. But, it’s okay. I’m probably odd too that I do not drink smoothies or blender drinks. I am not a coffee fan either. I was raised on sweet tea and diet Coke. Now, both of those are on the no-no list. So I drink water. Diabetes is hard for me. Getting a menu for a week is impossible, so I try to do two days at a time. Since I’m not a cook, I sometimes give up, drive, and get meals from a restaurant. There is just no easy way to deal with diabetes; it’s all consuming, and I don’t like to spend my time that way. At my senior age, I am somewhat stubborn.

Thanks for the suggestions.

retiredteacher


contentandwell
@contentandwell

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Posted by @contentandwell, Wed, Sep 13 9:21pm

@retiredteacher We each of course have our priorities and you obviously love nature. I enjoy it but I enjoy the hustle and bustle of cities more. I lived just outside of Boston prior to getting married and I loved walking up the main street (the town is Brookline, which many people think is actually a part of Boston, but it is not) and seeing such a diversity of people. I also do like that excellent medical care is just an hour away if needed. I have a problem with pharma also but not all doctors are huge prescribers, and I try to make sure whomever I am seeing is not. These days of course many medications are necessary since I am post-transplant. They are life saving.
I drink mostly water now too, often with a squeeze of lime in it, or lemon. I do drink coffee in the morning and green tea when I think of it, it is supposed to be really good for you.
Those canned “meal” drinks are not that bad, as I mentioned before, particularly when you put some berries in them. I am older also so it was not something I started doing regularly but now I find the convenience when I am rushing just works well for me.
Regarding the salt problem, I try to be very low sodium myself, keeping it to under 1500 mg a day. I keep track of my nutrients on myfitnesspal and today I was under 600 mg of salt, a low for me. There are many options now for peanut butter, crackers, and some other foods do have low sodium options. Soups are impossible though.
I try to not eat out much because most restaurants really do use a lot of salt.
Glad to hear you have your electricity again.
JK


Lisa Lucier, Connect Moderator
@lisalucier

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Posted by @lisalucier, 3 hours ago

Hi, @retiredteacher. Just wanted to check in and see how things are going post-Irma? Are things back to normal where you live?


retiredteacher
@retiredteacher

Posts: 58
Joined: May 10, 2017
Posted by @retiredteacher, 2 hours ago

Thanks for checking. We have had a problem since Erma came through. For some reason our water (which is public even though we live in the county) developed a muddy, gritty smell. Our whole county is affected. We have called everyone we know who is supposed to be in charge, and they say it’s algae from the river that filters through the treatment plant or whatever has to happen. They don’t know what kind of algae, and they claim it’s harmless. Now, I don’t trust that! If they don’t know what it is, how do they know it’s harmless? So we have been using bottled water and believe me that is a hassle. I cannot imagine what all of the people are going through who have lost everything from Harvey, Irma, Maria and doing without even the small comforts of living.
We are fine, but my morning blood is still high and my afternoon drops, as usual. It is not consistent, so I am not sure what causes it, and I know there is no one else who does. I have an appointment with my endo. in three weeks. I’ve asked before about it, but the answer is to see the dietician, and she is clueless. So I adjust it myself and see. I have almost become a vegetarian because I seem to do better with veggies than with meat. From what I’ve read, as a person gets older, the efficiency of the body slows and sometimes that causes a higher blood read. So, at my age that is probably part of the problem, since I am definitely not a spring chicken! There has been personal stress which is common in my life, and stress contributes also. So many factors that it’s just too much to check everything. I continue to do the best I can and have good days and bad days, as most people.
As people say, “Just keep on keeping on.” I hope everyone here is doing well. I look forward to cooler temperatures and Fall. I have decorated, even though it’s still 90 degrees outside.
Better health to all.

retiredteacher

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