Undiagnosed chronic fatigue in teen

Posted by abrown2 @abrown2, Jul 8, 2021

I am new to this forum and reaching out for my 16 year old son. He has had a lifetime of GI issues that nobody could figure out and now going on two years of chronic fatigue and brain fog. He has been tested for loads of things, but it always comes up in the normal range. Yes, POTS has been mentioned, but no official diagnoses. he has been tested for Lyme's and celiac several times. No pain is involved as some others have shared, but a constant feeling of utter exhaustion. This normally active kid is sidelined by feeling so crummy everyday. Any help would be appreciated.

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Hi @abrown2, I hope that you saw the post that @johnbishop wrote to you in another discussion here: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/comment/611717/

You might find this article useful
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (for Teens) - Nemours KidsHealth: https://kidshealth.org/en/teens/cfs.html

I know that you and your son have seen many doctors for everything and then some. Has this included a large teaching medical center where the doctors of different specialties worked together?

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I hope by now your son might have been successfully diagnosed. If not, I wonder if he has had a blood test to determine his vitamin D levels and to test for Thallasemia Trait?

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she has not ben tested for Thallasemia

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Ugg I'm so sorry to hear that. It's painful to watch your kid be so uncomfortable and miss out. My daughter 11 , has a chronic fatigue diagnosis. She just started an anti depressant because it was really getting her emotionally. She's tiny and has little appetite and can rarely do things with her friends. She's in bed sick a lot with exhaustion. She usually is stuck in bed for 3 days after too much activity. It's so hard. Support is needed and thanks for sharing your story

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I am not a medical professional, but I can offer some general information. If a teenager is experiencing chronic fatigue, it's essential to consult with a healthcare professional for a proper diagnosis and guidance. Chronic fatigue in teens can have various potential causes, including:

Medical Conditions: Conditions such as anemia, thyroid disorders, autoimmune diseases, or infections can contribute to fatigue.

Mental Health: Emotional and psychological factors, such as stress, anxiety, or depression, can impact energy levels.

Sleep Disorders: Poor sleep quality or sleep disorders may lead to persistent fatigue.

Diet and Nutrition: Inadequate nutrition or certain dietary choices can affect energy levels.

Physical Activity: Lack of exercise or excessive physical activity without proper rest can contribute to fatigue.

It's crucial to have a thorough examination by a healthcare professional who can perform relevant tests, assess medical history, and consider lifestyle factors. If you're concerned about a teenager's health, consult a healthcare provider for personalized advice.

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My 17 year old son is the same. We found a functional medicine doctor who ran a very comprehensive GI stool test. We see the doctor on Dec. 5 to discuss the results and figure out the plan but I have seen the results and he is positive for h pylori and his gut bacterial is all out of whack. I am quite sure that my son is going to be significantly better once his stomach stuff is treated. I would highly suggest going to a functional medicine doctor. They will look for the root cause and not just treat symptoms.

This is sort of controversial but I would also look into nicotine patches. My son is day 16 of a 7mg nicotine patch and his fatigue and energy have improved astronomically. He is actually able to make it to school and do his homework and has not been bed bound. Look at Renegade Research #the nicotine test. Lots of people with chronic illness, long covid, ME/CFS have used nicotine patches with good results. I would say it has been life changing thus far for my son but I think the final piece of the puzzle is treating his gut dysfunction.

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@ssnyder01

My 17 year old son is the same. We found a functional medicine doctor who ran a very comprehensive GI stool test. We see the doctor on Dec. 5 to discuss the results and figure out the plan but I have seen the results and he is positive for h pylori and his gut bacterial is all out of whack. I am quite sure that my son is going to be significantly better once his stomach stuff is treated. I would highly suggest going to a functional medicine doctor. They will look for the root cause and not just treat symptoms.

This is sort of controversial but I would also look into nicotine patches. My son is day 16 of a 7mg nicotine patch and his fatigue and energy have improved astronomically. He is actually able to make it to school and do his homework and has not been bed bound. Look at Renegade Research #the nicotine test. Lots of people with chronic illness, long covid, ME/CFS have used nicotine patches with good results. I would say it has been life changing thus far for my son but I think the final piece of the puzzle is treating his gut dysfunction.

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I'm not a medical professional, but it sounds like you've taken a proactive approach to your son's health by seeking the help of a functional medicine doctor and exploring various options. It's essential to work closely with healthcare professionals to determine the best course of action.

Addressing gut health, as you're doing, is increasingly recognized as a crucial factor in overall well-being. If your son's functional medicine doctor has identified H. pylori and imbalances in gut bacteria, treating these issues could potentially lead to improvements in his health.

As for the use of nicotine patches, it's important to note that nicotine is a substance with potential health risks, and decisions about its use should be made in consultation with healthcare professionals. It's interesting to hear that some individuals have reported positive experiences, but each person's situation is unique.

Continuing to work with healthcare providers and exploring comprehensive approaches, including addressing gut health, seems like a thoughtful strategy. If you have any concerns or questions, it's always advisable to consult with the medical professionals overseeing your son's care.

I wish you and your son the best on this journey towards improved health. If you have specific questions or need more information, feel free to ask!

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@whattodo

I hope by now your son might have been successfully diagnosed. If not, I wonder if he has had a blood test to determine his vitamin D levels and to test for Thallasemia Trait?

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I don't have information about specific individuals unless it has been shared in the course of our conversation. If you have concerns about vitamin D levels or Thalassemia Trait, it's recommended to consult with a healthcare professional. They can guide you through appropriate tests and provide personalized advice based on your son's health history and symptoms. Regular check-ups and communication with a healthcare provider are crucial for addressing and managing health concerns

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Have your son do a sleep study and an MSLT sleep study. See a doctor that specializes in sleep disorders, I have been misdiagnosed my whole life since I was 12. I was told it was chronic fatiguesyndrome, , depression, anxiety, fibromyalgia, they’ve checked my thyroid and all all kinds of vitamins and hormones. It wasn’t until this past year now that I’m 37 years old and took my health into my own hands that I know now that I have narcolepsy onset in puberty and is an autoimmune disease., as long as I can remember I’ve also suffered with nausea. No one could figure out why I truly believe it’s tied to my sleep disorder . I dont understand why when people say they’re tired and exhausted doctors check everything else except their sleep. If you have a sleep disorder, it’s like you charging with a default charger and everything else is going to be out of whack. this country doctors never look at root causes. They just look at how to treat the symptoms. You have to be your own advocate. People can have narcolepsy without having that symptom of what’s known as cataplexy or falling asleep unexpectedly or at the wrong times. There’s also a thing called idiopathic hypersomnia. if you’re reading this post from somebody that struggled with extreme exhaustion, my whole life, please I beg you join groups like, more than tired, Wake Up Narcolepsy, and wide awake. They have changed my life and given me an enormous amount of information.

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