Twinge feeling when urinating

Posted by barryallen8 @barryallen8, Sun, Feb 3 8:11pm

Does anyone have any advice about having the twinge feeling when you start your stream changing location. It has moved from the base of my penis which was how it always felt, down to the tip now and I can’t feel the urine pass really. It went from base then eventually middle and now the tip. I do not know what this means.

Google "prostititus ".

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@popolopo

Google "prostititus ".

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I can’t find stuff online so I’m asking here. And searching that term won’t give me an answer to this very odd not ok symptom.

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HI @barryallen8, that must be frustrating not knowing what is causing this "twinge" feeling.

While we wait for others to come join the conversation, can you describe the "twinge" feeling some more? Is it painful? Does it burn or sting? Or does it simply feel abnormal?

Also, have you spoken to a doctor about this at all or are you doing some investigating yourself at this time?

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@ethanmcconkey

HI @barryallen8, that must be frustrating not knowing what is causing this "twinge" feeling.

While we wait for others to come join the conversation, can you describe the "twinge" feeling some more? Is it painful? Does it burn or sting? Or does it simply feel abnormal?

Also, have you spoken to a doctor about this at all or are you doing some investigating yourself at this time?

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So the twinge feeling is something everyone has it’s not an abnormal sensation it’s a normal sensation. It’s that little feeling you have right when you relax the sphincter and start your stream. Normally it’s at the base of the penis. Butfor me the twinge when the stream starts has steadily moved down to the top of my penis. I hope that’s clear . It’s hard to describe. It’s the feeling you feel when you start/stop the stream. I fee it has weakened for me. I’m not entirely sure. There is no pain with it.

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@ethanmcconkey

HI @barryallen8, that must be frustrating not knowing what is causing this "twinge" feeling.

While we wait for others to come join the conversation, can you describe the "twinge" feeling some more? Is it painful? Does it burn or sting? Or does it simply feel abnormal?

Also, have you spoken to a doctor about this at all or are you doing some investigating yourself at this time?

Jump to this post

I have told a urologist at Mayo about this and they do not have an explanation for the time being.

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When I try to pee the twinge feeling when you start your pee. Like where you can start and stop the stream that feeling in your urethra. Basically where the sphincter relaxes. That starting of the stream feeling has moved down towards the end of my penis and is not at the base. Does anyone have any knowledge on this type of issue? I know it’s odd and hard to describe but I’ll try my best to explain further if some clarification is needed.

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@barryallen8

When I try to pee the twinge feeling when you start your pee. Like where you can start and stop the stream that feeling in your urethra. Basically where the sphincter relaxes. That starting of the stream feeling has moved down towards the end of my penis and is not at the base. Does anyone have any knowledge on this type of issue? I know it’s odd and hard to describe but I’ll try my best to explain further if some clarification is needed.

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I'd like to ask @predicatable to join this discussion. I think he may have some insights.

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Thanks to @colleenyoung I am coming in to your discussion @barryallen8 and I hope we can shed some light on the situation you're experiencing. I don't have a concise explanation covering your symptoms, so I'll set off on a stream of consciousness description of my situation and how it might lead to answers.

First, a little on my background in bladder and urethra functions. A few years ago, my prostate gland had grown to abnormal size and invaded the lower end of my bladder, causing severe incontinence of my urine. My urologist called it Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy (BPH) and arranged for surgery in a hospital and a stay overnight to ensure recovery was happening. The surgery involved no cutting through the skin; instead it was Transurethral Resection of the Prostate (TURP). It involved inserting a cystoscope (with lighted lens) through my penis, along the tube (urethra), through the bladder sphincter, and into the bladder. A clipping tool on the cystoscope snipped off many pieces of prostate tissue until the prostate bulge protruding into my bladder was removed and the pieces vacuumed out. Within two weeks, my recovery was complete.

Since then, my urethra and bladder sphincter have been invaded by cystoscope more than two dozen times. This unusual practice would not have been needed if it weren't for papillary cancers found on the lining of my bladder after the excess prostate tissue was removed to expose them. A dozen of those tumors were removed through the urethra with a procedure performed in a walk-in surgery center. All of them were regarded as aggressive, but not a major threat, because they were found and removed before they rooted into the muscle of my bladder. An immunotherapy treatment cleared any malignant cells, and my regular cystoscopes — now performed annually — confirm no tumors have survived to cause future problems.

All of this explains why I'm especially conscious of (and sensitive about) my ability to control urination, despite dozens of intrusions by cystoscope through my urethra and bladder sphincter where I also experience a "twinge" to release urine. Compared to your situation @barryallen8, my twinge has not moved from the base of my penis and bladder, although on rare occasion there is no twinge and I wet my pants or the urinal. As a result, I carry a half-dozen urine pads in my brief case or in my back pack in case of an impending urinary accident!

Against that background, you can see that I'm puzzled about how the urination "valve" in your sphincter could migrate down the urethra toward the tip of your penis. Let me sleep on that and provide some further thoughts in the morning. Martin

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@predictable

Thanks to @colleenyoung I am coming in to your discussion @barryallen8 and I hope we can shed some light on the situation you're experiencing. I don't have a concise explanation covering your symptoms, so I'll set off on a stream of consciousness description of my situation and how it might lead to answers.

First, a little on my background in bladder and urethra functions. A few years ago, my prostate gland had grown to abnormal size and invaded the lower end of my bladder, causing severe incontinence of my urine. My urologist called it Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy (BPH) and arranged for surgery in a hospital and a stay overnight to ensure recovery was happening. The surgery involved no cutting through the skin; instead it was Transurethral Resection of the Prostate (TURP). It involved inserting a cystoscope (with lighted lens) through my penis, along the tube (urethra), through the bladder sphincter, and into the bladder. A clipping tool on the cystoscope snipped off many pieces of prostate tissue until the prostate bulge protruding into my bladder was removed and the pieces vacuumed out. Within two weeks, my recovery was complete.

Since then, my urethra and bladder sphincter have been invaded by cystoscope more than two dozen times. This unusual practice would not have been needed if it weren't for papillary cancers found on the lining of my bladder after the excess prostate tissue was removed to expose them. A dozen of those tumors were removed through the urethra with a procedure performed in a walk-in surgery center. All of them were regarded as aggressive, but not a major threat, because they were found and removed before they rooted into the muscle of my bladder. An immunotherapy treatment cleared any malignant cells, and my regular cystoscopes — now performed annually — confirm no tumors have survived to cause future problems.

All of this explains why I'm especially conscious of (and sensitive about) my ability to control urination, despite dozens of intrusions by cystoscope through my urethra and bladder sphincter where I also experience a "twinge" to release urine. Compared to your situation @barryallen8, my twinge has not moved from the base of my penis and bladder, although on rare occasion there is no twinge and I wet my pants or the urinal. As a result, I carry a half-dozen urine pads in my brief case or in my back pack in case of an impending urinary accident!

Against that background, you can see that I'm puzzled about how the urination "valve" in your sphincter could migrate down the urethra toward the tip of your penis. Let me sleep on that and provide some further thoughts in the morning. Martin

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I’m a male. 25years old. I doubt we have similar cases. Ponder away though.

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Good morning @barryallen8. As promised, I got a good night's sleep and would like to pick up where I left off last night on the mystery of your migrating twinge when urinating. One source of advice comes from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, which may seem unrelated, but the Institute includes the urinary system under the kidney heading. Here's one link to them: https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/urologic-diseases/urinary-tract-how-it-works.

The main control of urination is provided by muscles — three sets of them — the bladder sphincter, the urethra tube to the outside from the bladder, and the pelvic floor muscles which support the urethra just below the bladder. Those muscles are activated by instructions from the brain conveyed by nerves to and from the bladder, the urethra, and the pelvic muscles. This raises questions about whether your problem is attributable to your nervous system, which might be the province of a neurologist. Might you have had a transient ischemic attach (TIA) or a minor stroke that could interfere with instructions from your brain? Perhaps an injury to your nerves at any point between your brain, your bladder, and your penis could be the cause — resulting from a physical accident or from a surgical procedure like I've had on my bladder or prostate?

Another possibility to ask your urologist about is a small growth on the lining of the urethra (downstream from your bladder). In my case, the lining of my bladder produced a number of papilloma tumors. Might similar growths occur on the lining of the urethra as a series of obstructions that developed in sequence over time? Would a cystoscope examination of the lower urinary tract (LUT) reveal whether a LUTO is the cause of your problem?

It doesn't seem to me that you are in particular danger from your relocating twinge. I wasn't endangered by my bladder tumors either when we discovered them, but if I didn't have my prostate surgery, I might have lost my bladder in a matter of months afterward. I hope your medical team will promptly help you solve your mystery symptom — just to be sure. Martin

Liked by thankful

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@popolopo

Google "prostititus ".

Jump to this post

Google "prostatitis".

REPLY
@predictable

Good morning @barryallen8. As promised, I got a good night's sleep and would like to pick up where I left off last night on the mystery of your migrating twinge when urinating. One source of advice comes from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, which may seem unrelated, but the Institute includes the urinary system under the kidney heading. Here's one link to them: https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/urologic-diseases/urinary-tract-how-it-works.

The main control of urination is provided by muscles — three sets of them — the bladder sphincter, the urethra tube to the outside from the bladder, and the pelvic floor muscles which support the urethra just below the bladder. Those muscles are activated by instructions from the brain conveyed by nerves to and from the bladder, the urethra, and the pelvic muscles. This raises questions about whether your problem is attributable to your nervous system, which might be the province of a neurologist. Might you have had a transient ischemic attach (TIA) or a minor stroke that could interfere with instructions from your brain? Perhaps an injury to your nerves at any point between your brain, your bladder, and your penis could be the cause — resulting from a physical accident or from a surgical procedure like I've had on my bladder or prostate?

Another possibility to ask your urologist about is a small growth on the lining of the urethra (downstream from your bladder). In my case, the lining of my bladder produced a number of papilloma tumors. Might similar growths occur on the lining of the urethra as a series of obstructions that developed in sequence over time? Would a cystoscope examination of the lower urinary tract (LUT) reveal whether a LUTO is the cause of your problem?

It doesn't seem to me that you are in particular danger from your relocating twinge. I wasn't endangered by my bladder tumors either when we discovered them, but if I didn't have my prostate surgery, I might have lost my bladder in a matter of months afterward. I hope your medical team will promptly help you solve your mystery symptom — just to be sure. Martin

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@predictable– Martin, Thank you for your wisdom & decernment explaining what you have been through and possible things that @barryallen8 should consider with his physician. I have to admit that your story strengthened my sphincter muscles 🙂 Jim @thankful

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@predictable

Good morning @barryallen8. As promised, I got a good night's sleep and would like to pick up where I left off last night on the mystery of your migrating twinge when urinating. One source of advice comes from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, which may seem unrelated, but the Institute includes the urinary system under the kidney heading. Here's one link to them: https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/urologic-diseases/urinary-tract-how-it-works.

The main control of urination is provided by muscles — three sets of them — the bladder sphincter, the urethra tube to the outside from the bladder, and the pelvic floor muscles which support the urethra just below the bladder. Those muscles are activated by instructions from the brain conveyed by nerves to and from the bladder, the urethra, and the pelvic muscles. This raises questions about whether your problem is attributable to your nervous system, which might be the province of a neurologist. Might you have had a transient ischemic attach (TIA) or a minor stroke that could interfere with instructions from your brain? Perhaps an injury to your nerves at any point between your brain, your bladder, and your penis could be the cause — resulting from a physical accident or from a surgical procedure like I've had on my bladder or prostate?

Another possibility to ask your urologist about is a small growth on the lining of the urethra (downstream from your bladder). In my case, the lining of my bladder produced a number of papilloma tumors. Might similar growths occur on the lining of the urethra as a series of obstructions that developed in sequence over time? Would a cystoscope examination of the lower urinary tract (LUT) reveal whether a LUTO is the cause of your problem?

It doesn't seem to me that you are in particular danger from your relocating twinge. I wasn't endangered by my bladder tumors either when we discovered them, but if I didn't have my prostate surgery, I might have lost my bladder in a matter of months afterward. I hope your medical team will promptly help you solve your mystery symptom — just to be sure. Martin

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Yeah I’ve been thinking this is all nuero Martin. I have an appointment next week with one. And I appreciate all the info and time you’ve spent for me. It’s greatly appreciated. I’ve been having issues nearly two years.

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CONSIDER WHETHER YOU ARE PASSING STONES. IF THE TWINGE IS EVERY TIME YOU URINATE, THEN PROBABLY NOT BUT IF OCCASIONAL, THEN CONSIDER IT. CONSIDER THE EFFECTS OF OXALATES IN YOUR FOOD.
D

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