Tuberculosis Test Results

Posted by aroostookmaine @aroostookmaine, May 11 7:41pm

Recieved a positive blood test and a negative skin test. Should I be concerned?

Hi @aroostookmaine and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. Members in the Connect forum aren’t medical professionals so we can’t diagnose health problems. However, we can share our own personal experiences and valuable insights to offer help and encouragement.

Were you having symptoms which prompted the TB test? When you received the results did you have a consultation with your medical provider?
They would have the best and most reliable answer to your question about the test. If you tested positive, just to be sure it’s safe, there should be a follow-up with your provider.

Here is an excerpt from the CDC website on tuberculin testing:
“Positive TB blood test: This means that the person has been infected with TB bacteria. Additional tests are needed to determine if the person has latent TB infection or TB disease.“
https://www.cdc.gov/tb/topic/testing/tbtesttypes.htm
Have you had any further testing to see if you have an active infection or if it’s latent?
Here is another informative link from the CDC regarding having latent TB and what that means.
https://www.cdc.gov/tb/topic/basics/tbinfectiondisease.htm
It would put your mind at ease by just calling your doctor to find out. ☺️

REPLY
@loribmt

Hi @aroostookmaine and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. Members in the Connect forum aren’t medical professionals so we can’t diagnose health problems. However, we can share our own personal experiences and valuable insights to offer help and encouragement.

Were you having symptoms which prompted the TB test? When you received the results did you have a consultation with your medical provider?
They would have the best and most reliable answer to your question about the test. If you tested positive, just to be sure it’s safe, there should be a follow-up with your provider.

Here is an excerpt from the CDC website on tuberculin testing:
“Positive TB blood test: This means that the person has been infected with TB bacteria. Additional tests are needed to determine if the person has latent TB infection or TB disease.“
https://www.cdc.gov/tb/topic/testing/tbtesttypes.htm
Have you had any further testing to see if you have an active infection or if it’s latent?
Here is another informative link from the CDC regarding having latent TB and what that means.
https://www.cdc.gov/tb/topic/basics/tbinfectiondisease.htm
It would put your mind at ease by just calling your doctor to find out. ☺️

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New employee testing.

REPLY
@loribmt

Hi @aroostookmaine and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. Members in the Connect forum aren’t medical professionals so we can’t diagnose health problems. However, we can share our own personal experiences and valuable insights to offer help and encouragement.

Were you having symptoms which prompted the TB test? When you received the results did you have a consultation with your medical provider?
They would have the best and most reliable answer to your question about the test. If you tested positive, just to be sure it’s safe, there should be a follow-up with your provider.

Here is an excerpt from the CDC website on tuberculin testing:
“Positive TB blood test: This means that the person has been infected with TB bacteria. Additional tests are needed to determine if the person has latent TB infection or TB disease.“
https://www.cdc.gov/tb/topic/testing/tbtesttypes.htm
Have you had any further testing to see if you have an active infection or if it’s latent?
Here is another informative link from the CDC regarding having latent TB and what that means.
https://www.cdc.gov/tb/topic/basics/tbinfectiondisease.htm
It would put your mind at ease by just calling your doctor to find out. ☺️

Jump to this post

No symptoms , blood test first and then a skin test as second test which is negative. Waiting on chest xray.

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@aroostookmaine

No symptoms , blood test first and then a skin test as second test which is negative. Waiting on chest xray.

Jump to this post

Well, that’s unfortunate with the timing of your new job. Hopefully this doesn’t interfere with your getting the position. However if you have latent TB it is good that it’s been detected early as it is treatable.
On the previous links I provided to the CDC, there is more on the topic of latent TB and the treatments available. I’m sure your physician will guide you through this if needed.

Hope this helps clarify things for you. ☺️

REPLY
@loribmt

Well, that’s unfortunate with the timing of your new job. Hopefully this doesn’t interfere with your getting the position. However if you have latent TB it is good that it’s been detected early as it is treatable.
On the previous links I provided to the CDC, there is more on the topic of latent TB and the treatments available. I’m sure your physician will guide you through this if needed.

Hope this helps clarify things for you. ☺️

Jump to this post

It is not uncommon to be diagnosed with latent TB without symptoms. This can happen through contact, often unknowing, with someone infected.

Infectious Disease specialists generally have a threshold number of colonies, or evidence on a chest xray of active infection before they treat with antibiotics.

My daughter was exposed working as a nurse in a jail with a large number of infected inmates, and the occupational health doc ordered antibiotics. When she later saw the ID doc he stopped the treatment because of few colonies and no symptoms.

Just something to keep in mind. PS, for 30 years my brother and I always had positive skin tests, but we're never treated -last time,we both tested negative.
Sue

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