Tight fascia: How to know a massage is too deep or not deep enough?

Posted by janeym @janeym, Jan 1 11:27am

How to know when a massage is too deep or not deep enough to help. Just started massage after Trigger point injections with pain clinic. Comments?

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Hi @janeym and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect.

Have you checked out this discussion on Myofascial Release Therapy (MFR) for treating compression and pain?
https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/myofascial-release-therapy-mfr-for-treating-compression-and-pain/
Are you getting the massages from a therapist at the hospital or the pain clinic? It's important that your therapist is familiar with your medical history so that they don't hurt you rather than help you.

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@amandaa

Hi @janeym and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect.

Have you checked out this discussion on Myofascial Release Therapy (MFR) for treating compression and pain?
https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/myofascial-release-therapy-mfr-for-treating-compression-and-pain/
Are you getting the massages from a therapist at the hospital or the pain clinic? It's important that your therapist is familiar with your medical history so that they don't hurt you rather than help you.

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Hi Amanda
Thank you. No the therapist was local. My Pain Dr said to give them a try. It is a highly recommended clinic. I provided an overview of my history but he did not want to many details. Just examined my and started. It didn't hurt too much except one trigger point. The next day I had a big urge to stretch and that might have not been a good idea. The past 2 days I am very sore and stiff. I thinking of postponing the one scheduled for this week.
I am just not sure how I should feel after this massage. I had lots before my chronic pain set in about a year or so. I appreciate your comment about hurt more than help…

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Thank you very much Deb. Very interesting. Not that surprising. I am a retired scientist (PhD) and seems the fascia thing is at the pseudo science stage at least now.
Still sore…

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@janeym

Thank you very much Deb. Very interesting. Not that surprising. I am a retired scientist (PhD) and seems the fascia thing is at the pseudo science stage at least now.
Still sore…

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You're welcome. Paul Ingraham, the author of that article and owner of PainScience.com, was a massage therapist in Canada. His training was far more rigorous and science- based than it is now. He left MT to because of pseudoscience getting a foothold in the field. It's frustrating to see so many people here falling prey to it when they're desperate.

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Hi @janeym, you ask such a great question. "How do you know when a massage is too deep or not deep enough to help?"
In fact, I added the question to the title of this discussion.

Here is some further information about myofascial release from trusted sources such as Mayo Clinic and Cleveland Clinic
– How Your Body Can Benefit From Myofascial Release https://health.clevelandclinic.org/how-your-body-can-benefit-from-myofascial-release/
– Expert Q&A: Myofascial release therapy: Can it relieve back pain? https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/back-pain/expert-answers/myofascial-release/faq-20058136

"Recognize when you should back off: Myofascial release is not a competitive sport. You have nothing to prove to anyone and it isn’t about how much pain you can stand before you pass out."

Currently, the experts agree:
"Few studies, however, have tested myofascial release therapy specifically, partly because the exact elements of myofascial release therapy vary from therapist to therapist. If you've been told that myofascial release therapy may be helpful for your back pain, consult a therapist who has training in the technique."

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Thank you Colleen! had seen these articles as I am a great Mayo and Cleveland fan!
My guess is the therapist released a trigger point but set my pyriformis spasm again and sciatica came back and I get referred pain in my shoulders.
Trial and error of pain management…

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I have had two knee replacements on one knee and have much pain when walking. I have had multiple physical therapy sessions and a nerve block to no avail. The more I walk the more it hurts. One Dr. said it could be IT band syndrome. Could myofascial release help my problem if it is IT band. My knee is secure and in the right place. Pain for 4 years now and no one seems to be able to figure it out. The pain is on the lateral side of the knee. Thanks for any help.

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@judyangel

I have had two knee replacements on one knee and have much pain when walking. I have had multiple physical therapy sessions and a nerve block to no avail. The more I walk the more it hurts. One Dr. said it could be IT band syndrome. Could myofascial release help my problem if it is IT band. My knee is secure and in the right place. Pain for 4 years now and no one seems to be able to figure it out. The pain is on the lateral side of the knee. Thanks for any help.

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Good evening @judyangel……I hoped to get back to you sooner but my MFR therapist has pneumonia. I finally got to talk with her today. She thinks you may be helped with MFR…..if you do have an IT band syndrome. It is certainly worth the effort. She explained to me how the MFR therapist would tackle the problem. It was a little to technical for me. However, I will see her again on Monday so if it is an IT band issue, I can be sure and get specific MFR information for you. Do you have an MFR therapist that you see regularly?

Just let me know and I will send it along.
Chris

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Thank you for replying.. I appreciate any help I can get. No I do not have a MFR therapist. I live in Palm Springs and next week I am supposed to start physical therapy at the hospital. I have been through PT many times and it has not helped. So I read about MFR and wondered if that would be any different than the regular PT. Thanks Judy

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@janeym

Hi Amanda
Thank you. No the therapist was local. My Pain Dr said to give them a try. It is a highly recommended clinic. I provided an overview of my history but he did not want to many details. Just examined my and started. It didn't hurt too much except one trigger point. The next day I had a big urge to stretch and that might have not been a good idea. The past 2 days I am very sore and stiff. I thinking of postponing the one scheduled for this week.
I am just not sure how I should feel after this massage. I had lots before my chronic pain set in about a year or so. I appreciate your comment about hurt more than help…

Jump to this post

A goid massage feels like buying a shoe: it has to feel good all rhe way ( and not in a few days after running in- in case of the shoes!) its very dificult to decide ehos the good and the bad masseur! Go by your tommy…. If it feels good its because it does you good!

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Ok I read the article and it had a lot of BS; does massage therapy work after a fusion from S-1 to L-1? Does massages do damage after having a Metronic’s stimulator and pain pump implanted? As it appears I am tired of hurting.

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