Mental Health: There really are people out there who care

Posted by Shirley Hugh-Jesst @audriana, Sep 3, 2021

I'd like to meet the person who wrote this, but the author is unknown. This was posted on Facebook today, 3 September 2021:

Sertraline- Zoloft
Venlafaxine- Effexor
Citalopram- Celexa
Mirtazapine-Remeron
Fluoxetine- Prozac
Duloxetine- Cymbalta
Seroquel- Quetiapine
Lamictal- Lamotrigine
Lexapro- Escitalopram
Wellbutrin- Bupropion
Lorazepam- Ativan
Klonopin- Clonazepam

If you're savvy enough to know what these tablets are or know a loved one who takes them, then I don't have to describe to you what this post is regarding. But in case you don't, I will fill you in.

That medication allows people to deal with a normal day to day life. Although most days it leaves them tired, spaced out, emotionless, or even super emotional. Crazy right? Why would anyone want to feel like that? Well this is why!!

You see, some people suffer from severe depression and anxiety. In their brain it doesn't sit right, something seems different. They notice little differences that other people wouldn't. Most days they wake up sick and feel sleepless. They consistently over think every situation. A comment about them– was it a joke? Was that person supposed to laugh? Or did they mean it? Are they being nice? Are they talking about them? Do they talk about them? They then think I bet they don’t like me really.

They say sorry all the time. They feel like they annoy everyone.
And for all those questions they will spend hours trying to answer. Let it all build up in their mind, until it sends them to tears…… it's mental that they see things that way.

It's not only mental changes, but physical changes. They don't eat a lot or they eat way too much. Insomnia, up all night answering questions to situations that don't even exist, or sleep too much and waste half their day still feeling tired. They still smile and they have every excuse for when you ask why.

But the tablets can help them.
Because they know when they start to feel this way or think this way, they need help. They know that when their behaviour starts to change, They need guidance. And they understand that they don't need to be ashamed. They don't need to be understood. They just need to be accepted. Everyone is fighting a battle and sometimes you need to be kinder.

So I may just be another person who's talking about mental health….

Living with this illness is hard, but trying to understand it, is even harder. It’s also 100 times harder if they have another condition on top of this.

Don't suffer in silence.❤

#speakout
#CopyAndPasteIfYouCanAndAreWilling

Stop the stigma!

Mental health is just as important as physical health.

#mentalhealthmatters
#mentalhealthadvocate

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Depression & Anxiety Support Group.

Yes @marionwilhelm… in "my" head because everyone is different.

REPLY
@marionwilhelm

Thank you for sharing. I have anxiety & depression & have never been able to articulate how it feels. I showed it to my husband & said, ”this is what goes on in *my* head.”

Jump to this post

Right on @marionwilhelm . I felt the same way. The abundance of negative self talk is a sure sign I need to stop and check in with myself. Ask questions of myself like, why are you examining every regret and poor decision you’ve made over fifty years? Why did you dive into this cesspool of of sadness and recriminations?

Then there’s the me that loves my yard and gardening, my dog Ellie, writing, art, my children and grandchildren, morning coffee. Those things I love are who I am. Writing them helps. And so do meds.

I think most of us are multifaceted. There’s the work person, the family person, the person we think we should be (watch out for that one), the me who has a mental illness – the list can be lengthy.

A real wrench 🔧 in the works for me was, what happened to me the artist/creative?That’s integral to who I am but not in a traditional way. I had thrown that part of me away so I could keep up with expected social milestones. Being self-supporting, career, marriage, children, working again but with a lot more at stake. And to top it all off depression.

And I can’t change the script. Got to keep going and take care as best I can. But when you have the added burden of depression and manic episodes, that intensifies the burden.

I have a niece. She has uncontrolled bipolar and is alcoholic. She is currently in jail. She is a remarkable woman whose not been able to accept the limitations her condition requires. It’s very painful to watch. I’ve been through two major episodes, but this time I’ve chosen not to go to bat for her.

The only person she hasn’t asked for help is herself. She’s burned a lot of bridges. I told her she can always call or text but that’s as much as I can do. I think she feels too ashamed to call. Deep down I think, I know if she’s willing to be her own hero (a role she’s played in the lives of others) and see this illness is bigger than she is, she’ll be even more remarkable. She may well be homeless, I’m not sure. I’m in Florida and she’s in New York.

All this is to say, mind your facets. And mine your facets. Remember that part of you that once loved to . . . . (fill in the blank). Hold on to that part, make it a destination.

When I neglect a plant, I know it’s time to go back to the drawing board.

I’m back in my yard, and repotted a plantly or two and added wellbutrin to my citalopram.

REPLY
@suzbyrne

Right on @marionwilhelm . I felt the same way. The abundance of negative self talk is a sure sign I need to stop and check in with myself. Ask questions of myself like, why are you examining every regret and poor decision you’ve made over fifty years? Why did you dive into this cesspool of of sadness and recriminations?

Then there’s the me that loves my yard and gardening, my dog Ellie, writing, art, my children and grandchildren, morning coffee. Those things I love are who I am. Writing them helps. And so do meds.

I think most of us are multifaceted. There’s the work person, the family person, the person we think we should be (watch out for that one), the me who has a mental illness – the list can be lengthy.

A real wrench 🔧 in the works for me was, what happened to me the artist/creative?That’s integral to who I am but not in a traditional way. I had thrown that part of me away so I could keep up with expected social milestones. Being self-supporting, career, marriage, children, working again but with a lot more at stake. And to top it all off depression.

And I can’t change the script. Got to keep going and take care as best I can. But when you have the added burden of depression and manic episodes, that intensifies the burden.

I have a niece. She has uncontrolled bipolar and is alcoholic. She is currently in jail. She is a remarkable woman whose not been able to accept the limitations her condition requires. It’s very painful to watch. I’ve been through two major episodes, but this time I’ve chosen not to go to bat for her.

The only person she hasn’t asked for help is herself. She’s burned a lot of bridges. I told her she can always call or text but that’s as much as I can do. I think she feels too ashamed to call. Deep down I think, I know if she’s willing to be her own hero (a role she’s played in the lives of others) and see this illness is bigger than she is, she’ll be even more remarkable. She may well be homeless, I’m not sure. I’m in Florida and she’s in New York.

All this is to say, mind your facets. And mine your facets. Remember that part of you that once loved to . . . . (fill in the blank). Hold on to that part, make it a destination.

When I neglect a plant, I know it’s time to go back to the drawing board.

I’m back in my yard, and repotted a plantly or two and added wellbutrin to my citalopram.

Jump to this post

When I decide it's time to beat myself up about dumb things I've saidor stupid things I've done I just say, “stop, stop, STOP.” then I tell myself to move on & I do. It is so easy to back slide but by stopping myself from a litany of sins & recriminations I can control *me.*

REPLY

@marionwilhelm Sounds good. Whatever way we can stop ourselves from falling into that pattern and playing those "tapes" is the way to go. I wish you well with your journey. 🙂

REPLY

These two keep me perking along.

REPLY
@clutch

Yes, there has been untold good to come of these drugs. But as many of know there is a cautionary tale that comes along with them, too Some of us never received the negative until it's too late and have to suffer the consequences of withdrawal. These drugs have just relatively recently come under vast scrutiny because of their side effects and any one pondering the cost/benefit in taking them, would be wise to heed the warnings.

Jump to this post

@clutch.the dreaded therapeutic dose:
Cymbalta–projectile vomiting
Topamax–benign essential Blepharospasms
These are only two out of my vast repertoire.
MED A causes nausea so add
MED B to counter nausea but causes constipation so add
MED C which causes projectile diarrhea…
The cycle is indeed a cautionary tale: side effects, efficacy, and "your doctor has determined its benefits far outweigh the negative. Not always applicable to everyone. Be aware, be vigilant and be a knowledgeable consumer.
I am much more assertive in asking about side effects, titration, getting off of one creepy feeling medication before starting another creepy feeling medication. This allows me to discern which one is creepier, which one caused new side effects before getting creepy.
I have an annual Medicare appointment with the pharmacologist tomorrow.
Across the board, from cardiac to whatever, I'm taking fewer medications at 66 then when I was 46.
I've been proactive.

REPLY
Please sign in or register to post a reply.