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The Frightening Part of the Year

Posted by @retiredteacher, Thu, Oct 18 10:21pm

The fall season through Happy New Year is the hardest time of the year for me. Everywhere I look I see tempting foods of all types that people enjoy only once a year. I used to love all the fabulous desserts and the candies, fudge, cakes, pies and rich treats associated with every step from Halloween to Thanksgiving to Christmas to New Years. That's a quadruple whammy of temptation. I think I'm not the only one who has this temptation to face.
The way I deal with it is not to buy any of the sweets and I do not cook them. I do allow myself one small treat at each special meal, except Halloween. I make the desserts myself so I can control the ingredients. They aren't gourmet and most people would probably not want them, but to me they are delicious, and I enjoy them with a cup of decaf coffee, and there's nothing better.
I always stop and ask myself if eating the high carb, high calorie butter and sugar laden dessert is worth what it will do to my blood reading. The answer is that for me it is not worth it. I am on no medication so I have to be especially careful to control my food because I want to stay med-free. I can do that and I will. I hope we all just enjoy the season and the fun of the holidays and we don't get depressed because we can't have all the goodies. I say I have control and have it figured out so eating what I call illegal foods is not on my menu plans. Let's say Happy Halloween! Happy Thanksgiving! Merry Christmas! and Happy New Year! Let's enjoy the activity and music and whatever we love about this time of year. These holidays are so much bigger than the food.
We have to be as healthy as possible and enjoy the holidays. I hope everyone will feel good and concentrate on the positives.
Happy everything!
@retiredteacher

REPLY

Just think of what awaits me, as I am from Louisiana! (Where super size portions are the norm here). I do indulge for the holidays, but I do an awful lot of walking during this time of year. Of course, it doesn't erase all that sugar, but it does help to keep me in a manageable range, mostly : ) God Bless you my friend! I am making my mom's homemade Lemon Pie this year; I haven't made it in 6 years–since I found out I had diabetes. But, one piece won't kill me, and I plan on walking for an hour after I eat it! Whatever sweets you do choose to eat, I have found that savoring every bite does help you enjoy what you do get to eat!

Bless you @chocolate5lover. Your moniker says it all. It could be mine too. Chocolate! Yum. But, diabetes—-Boo! That's why I said I'll enjoy a treat for each meal, but like you, one small piece or slice. That's all I allow myself. I admire you being willing to exercise to compensate for the treat. I just don't exercise except for my chores around the house. However, I have been thinking about making the Mayo Clinic's 12 week exercise walking plan a goal. I have a food journal from the day I received a letter from my PCP telling me I was a diabetic, so I have all of the info I researched and what I had to teach myself to be my own dr. since she didn't know. I think an exercise journal would be good to go along with my food journal. I look for new recipes and allowable foods so that my blood numbers will stay in line. Thinking of anything yummy and sweet makes my mouth water. I am from GA, so I understand big portions. My mother always said, "Better to have more food, than not enough," so our meals were a full table. I love lemon pie, so I know it will be delicious. Enjoy.

@retiredteacher

@retiredteacher @chocolate5lover I too have this battle with myself. Mine is just not diabetes but also weight control. I try to exercise a lot to help with that. We just returned from a vacation, the last four days of which were in Charleston. Oh my goodness, I don't know how anyone down there doesn't weigh a ton! So much fatty and sweet food! I did get a lot of walking in so hopefully that helped. I did gain weight though and am working hard to try to lose it before the holidays.
By the way, I do allow myself a piece of dark (at least 70% cocoa) most days. It actually is not that high in carbs, and they say it is good for you. Thankfully I love dark chocolate so it's no sacrifice for me to eat that rather than milk chocolate or the chocolates lower in cocoa.
JK

@retiredteacher

Bless you @chocolate5lover. Your moniker says it all. It could be mine too. Chocolate! Yum. But, diabetes—-Boo! That's why I said I'll enjoy a treat for each meal, but like you, one small piece or slice. That's all I allow myself. I admire you being willing to exercise to compensate for the treat. I just don't exercise except for my chores around the house. However, I have been thinking about making the Mayo Clinic's 12 week exercise walking plan a goal. I have a food journal from the day I received a letter from my PCP telling me I was a diabetic, so I have all of the info I researched and what I had to teach myself to be my own dr. since she didn't know. I think an exercise journal would be good to go along with my food journal. I look for new recipes and allowable foods so that my blood numbers will stay in line. Thinking of anything yummy and sweet makes my mouth water. I am from GA, so I understand big portions. My mother always said, "Better to have more food, than not enough," so our meals were a full table. I love lemon pie, so I know it will be delicious. Enjoy.

@retiredteacher

Jump to this post

I, too, encountered this: my PCP not being very knowledgeable. The Dr. had a general knowledge only, and just loaded me down with med's. I have an excellent book on diabetes called Understanding Diabetes by H. Peter Chase, MD. I don't know if it is available to the public or not–as it was used for Dr.'s and Nurses as a training guide in the hospital where my wife works. It is written as a guide for parents who's children have the disease, but it is excellent for anyone. It has tons of great info in it, and it is my go-to book. It has the cartoon character, The Pink Panther on the cover–don't let that fool you, it is a great book. Enjoy your holidays, my friend!

@contentandwell

@retiredteacher @chocolate5lover I too have this battle with myself. Mine is just not diabetes but also weight control. I try to exercise a lot to help with that. We just returned from a vacation, the last four days of which were in Charleston. Oh my goodness, I don't know how anyone down there doesn't weigh a ton! So much fatty and sweet food! I did get a lot of walking in so hopefully that helped. I did gain weight though and am working hard to try to lose it before the holidays.
By the way, I do allow myself a piece of dark (at least 70% cocoa) most days. It actually is not that high in carbs, and they say it is good for you. Thankfully I love dark chocolate so it's no sacrifice for me to eat that rather than milk chocolate or the chocolates lower in cocoa.
JK

Jump to this post

I also have a battle with weight control. I lost 45 pounds since they discovered my diabetes 6 years ago; and still have trouble keeping that A1C down. I could still stand to lose about 25 more, but I have kept off the 45 pounds for 6 years so that is a miracle in itself, considering how much I love to eat! Perhaps I will never be at my ideal weight, but I am healthier than when I started on this journey. Don't fret too much about a few pounds, live–enjoy your life–when you get back to your normal schedule, it will even out. One of the things I have learned about weight is: the more upset you get about it, the more it tends to go up. Contentandwell, you still haven't sold me on the dark chocolate–it tastes like mud to me. I guess it is because I have loved milk chocolate for so long–if I could get it in an IV, I think I would be first in line!!!!! Have a great week, my friend!

@chocolate5lover

I also have a battle with weight control. I lost 45 pounds since they discovered my diabetes 6 years ago; and still have trouble keeping that A1C down. I could still stand to lose about 25 more, but I have kept off the 45 pounds for 6 years so that is a miracle in itself, considering how much I love to eat! Perhaps I will never be at my ideal weight, but I am healthier than when I started on this journey. Don't fret too much about a few pounds, live–enjoy your life–when you get back to your normal schedule, it will even out. One of the things I have learned about weight is: the more upset you get about it, the more it tends to go up. Contentandwell, you still haven't sold me on the dark chocolate–it tastes like mud to me. I guess it is because I have loved milk chocolate for so long–if I could get it in an IV, I think I would be first in line!!!!! Have a great week, my friend!

Jump to this post

@chocolate5lover milk chocolate just tastes bland to me, I started eating dark chocolate when I was just a kid because my mother favored it. I suspect that dark chocolate was more in the 50 – 60 percent range though. I like it all the way up to 85% but more than that I don’t care for.
I have been gaining weight for a while now and vacation was really the icing on the cake – even though I ate no cake! I would like to lose 10 – 12 pounds to get back to a more comfortable weight where my clothes fit. Thankfully I still had some pants from a higher weight so I am stuck wearing them right now. Some of the gain is fluid retention from eating out so much – I use very little salt at home. Experience has shown me that even fluid takes a couple of weeks to make its way out of my tissues.
JK

@chocolate5lover

I, too, encountered this: my PCP not being very knowledgeable. The Dr. had a general knowledge only, and just loaded me down with med's. I have an excellent book on diabetes called Understanding Diabetes by H. Peter Chase, MD. I don't know if it is available to the public or not–as it was used for Dr.'s and Nurses as a training guide in the hospital where my wife works. It is written as a guide for parents who's children have the disease, but it is excellent for anyone. It has tons of great info in it, and it is my go-to book. It has the cartoon character, The Pink Panther on the cover–don't let that fool you, it is a great book. Enjoy your holidays, my friend!

Jump to this post

@chocolate5lover, I searched for the Understanding Diabetes book and only found it in used paperback on eBay, There are 11 editions. I'd like to read this and put it with my Mayo collection on Diabetes. Which edition is the best? This sounds like it would be a helpful addition to what I already have researched and read from Mayo. I am always looking for information since, as I mentioned, my PCP just doesn't know.

Thanks for any recommendation.
@retiredteacher

Liked by chocolate5lover

@retiredteacher

@chocolate5lover, I searched for the Understanding Diabetes book and only found it in used paperback on eBay, There are 11 editions. I'd like to read this and put it with my Mayo collection on Diabetes. Which edition is the best? This sounds like it would be a helpful addition to what I already have researched and read from Mayo. I am always looking for information since, as I mentioned, my PCP just doesn't know.

Thanks for any recommendation.
@retiredteacher

Jump to this post

My copy is the 11th edition. It has 328 pages, they do make a smaller summary copy of the book; but I never read that one. It has a copyright date of 2006. It is the best book I have found so far on diabetes. It has very detailed information on all aspects of this disease. Happy reading!

@contentandwell

@chocolate5lover milk chocolate just tastes bland to me, I started eating dark chocolate when I was just a kid because my mother favored it. I suspect that dark chocolate was more in the 50 – 60 percent range though. I like it all the way up to 85% but more than that I don’t care for.
I have been gaining weight for a while now and vacation was really the icing on the cake – even though I ate no cake! I would like to lose 10 – 12 pounds to get back to a more comfortable weight where my clothes fit. Thankfully I still had some pants from a higher weight so I am stuck wearing them right now. Some of the gain is fluid retention from eating out so much – I use very little salt at home. Experience has shown me that even fluid takes a couple of weeks to make its way out of my tissues.
JK

Jump to this post

I always keep a pair of warm-up pants around, just in case I have enjoyed too much good cooking. I call these my holiday pants : ) It pays to have a sense of humor when battling a pesky disease.

@chocolate5lover

My copy is the 11th edition. It has 328 pages, they do make a smaller summary copy of the book; but I never read that one. It has a copyright date of 2006. It is the best book I have found so far on diabetes. It has very detailed information on all aspects of this disease. Happy reading!

Jump to this post

I found the 11th Edition of Dr. Chase's book on Amazon and ordered it. I should have it by Nov. 5th. I look forward to reading it, and I thank you for suggesting it. The Mayo Clinic books are good also, but more is better. We need to know all we can to deal with this disease. Thanks for that suggestion.

@retiredteacher

Liked by chocolate5lover

@chocolate5lover

I always keep a pair of warm-up pants around, just in case I have enjoyed too much good cooking. I call these my holiday pants : ) It pays to have a sense of humor when battling a pesky disease.

Jump to this post

This is too funny. I have more weight to lose than you do, and I am really going to try as a New Year's Resolution. I just do not like exercise and sweating! You are right about having a sense of humor with this disease because I never know what's coming down the pike with it. Every day is different, so it keeps me on my toes.
Can't wait to get the Chase book.
@retiredteacher

@retiredteacher

I found the 11th Edition of Dr. Chase's book on Amazon and ordered it. I should have it by Nov. 5th. I look forward to reading it, and I thank you for suggesting it. The Mayo Clinic books are good also, but more is better. We need to know all we can to deal with this disease. Thanks for that suggestion.

@retiredteacher

Jump to this post

Your welcome, I have the Mayo Clinic book on diabetes also. I never did finish that one; I will have to go back and read it. I forgot about it, as I was battling really high sugars back then.

@chocolate5lover, The Understanding Diabetes book came in the mail this afternoon. It is a large paperback and looks as if it's filled with information that will be helpful to me and anyone who has questions about Diabetes. I love the Pink Panther format; that keeps it from being so scary.
Well, my first hurdle is only 6 days away; have to watch out for the carb monster, so no sweets in the house. The little ghosts and goblins will just have to go by our house. No goodies here.
Thanks again for recommending the book. I'll let you know how it's going as I read various parts of it.
@retiredteacher

@retiredteacher

@chocolate5lover, The Understanding Diabetes book came in the mail this afternoon. It is a large paperback and looks as if it's filled with information that will be helpful to me and anyone who has questions about Diabetes. I love the Pink Panther format; that keeps it from being so scary.
Well, my first hurdle is only 6 days away; have to watch out for the carb monster, so no sweets in the house. The little ghosts and goblins will just have to go by our house. No goodies here.
Thanks again for recommending the book. I'll let you know how it's going as I read various parts of it.
@retiredteacher

Jump to this post

I think you will enjoy it–I strongly recommend the various charts that are in the book; they are great to study, and use as a handy reference guide. Happy reading!

Liked by chocolate5lover

Thanks for starting this conversation, Caro, @retiredteacher . As we all deal with this "Frightening Part of the Year" I wanted to share with you something that I saw in the Mayo Clinic Diet Newsletter that came in my Inbox today. The title is: Friends and family: How to Deal with Diet Saboteurs

"Don't let those closest to you unravel your weight-loss plan. Stay on course in any situation with this advice. This article offers some good advice on how to be appreciative of the efforts people make to provide food and yet how to avoid the practice of overeating on all of these goodies.

Often, the people you spend the most time with — your family, friends and co-workers — may create high-risk eating situations for you. This could be an intentional attempt to undermine your weight-loss effort from a jealous friend or sibling, or it could be unintentional because many people don't understand how difficult it is to eat healthy on a consistent, ongoing basis. To stay focused on your goals, you need to know how to manage negative influences in your social circles. Review these scenarios and make a plan for the next challenge a potential saboteur presents.

Scenario: Your spouse surprises you by bringing home your favorite dessert.

Your response: Stay cool. Thank your spouse for thinking of you, and then remind your loved one that you are adopting healthier eating habits and don't need any food treats right now. Ask that the dessert be put somewhere you won't see it. If you can work it into your meal plan, divide the treat into multiple portions. If this scenario happens more than once, throw away the food treats — and be sure to tell your spouse that inedible gifts, like flowers, are the appropriate surprises for you.

Scenario: Friends expect you to continue with the group's eating traditions, such as beer and appetizers after work, junk food while watching sporting events together or regular stops at your favorite ice-cream shop.

Your response: Take the lead in scheduling nonfood activities, such as a game of badminton or bocce ball. Invite your friends to your house so that you can serve some of your favorite healthy foods. Ask for their help as you lose weight, and make it clear that your decision to change eating habits is not meant as a criticism of them. Let them know that you value their friendship and that their support for your healthy lifestyle changes is very important to you.

Scenario: Your family refuses to eat the new, healthier meals you're preparing.

Your response: First, take it slow. Don't change the whole menu overnight. As you introduce new foods, remind your family how important it is for all of you to take better care of yourselves. Healthy eating is more than weight management; it can improve the energy level and quality of life for everyone. Tell your family that you're managing your weight in part for them, so you can be a healthier, happier person. Invite them to suggest some healthy foods or recipes to try.

Scenario: Your best friend surprises you with a birthday party, complete with a table of tempting treats.

Your response: Express your amazement and pleasure at the thoughtful gesture. Comment on the visual appeal of some of the foods (you're giving praise without taking a bite). Slowly sip a glass of water with a lemon slice. Then, before visiting the food table, decide what and how much you're going to eat. Keep portions small, nibble slowly and occupy yourself with something else — chatting with friends, introducing people who don't know one another or getting groups together to take photos. Finally, congratulate yourself on managing a high-risk situation! After the event is over, talk to your best friend about ways to truly support you.

Your turn! Think of how your support people can help you in your journey: Can they provide emotional support by simply letting you vent or offering encouragement? Or can they provide practical support and go for a walk with you? Talk to your friends and family and ask for their help. Then identify your most-challenging scenarios with family and friends. Think through your best responses and strategies, and store them for future use. We can all benefit from support in our weight-loss journeys."

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