Medications for Temporal Arteritis/Giant Cell Arteritis (GCA)

Posted by charann2000 @charann2000, Apr 25, 2018

Anyone out there who has been diagnosed with Temperol Arteritis (Giant Cell Arteritis). I am undergoing testing and most likely have it. Would like to know how anyone is doing with it and what type of medications they use and any side effects, etc.

Liked by captainkenny

@tinkerbell

@charann2000 – The only time I had any pain when my temple was touched was when the surgeon pushed on it really hard as he examined me before the biopsy. I sure hope you don’t have GCA and it sounds like the medicine you are taking right now has helped. Keep us posted when you see the RA.

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@charann2000 – It sounds like you had good care in the rural area where you have your place. You really had a bad cut. Take care and keep us posted if anything changes in your life.

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@654321 – The HPA is the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. I have not had this test. Any of this type of test you would need would be ordered by an endocrinologist. My husband does medical research and he is the reason that I had the ACTH Stimulation Test. The doctors never suggested the test. They draw blood first which is a baseline and then give you an injection to stimulate the adrenal gland (adrenocorticotropic). They draw blood again at 30 minutes and then at 1 hour. I was at 12 when they drew the blood and then 16 at 30 min and 18 at an hour. The Endocrinologist said the results were great. Now just hoping all goes well with the tapering. These test normally have to be ordered and interpreted by an Endocrinologist. Mayo sent me to the in-house Endocrinologist and she said she would do any tests requested by Neurology.

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Thank you so much. I go to the Texas Arthiris clinic which I have been with 2015. I am now on 5 mg. Of predizone . Blood work today and praying I get to stay there or go down.

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@tinkerbell

@654321 – The HPA is the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. I have not had this test. Any of this type of test you would need would be ordered by an endocrinologist. My husband does medical research and he is the reason that I had the ACTH Stimulation Test. The doctors never suggested the test. They draw blood first which is a baseline and then give you an injection to stimulate the adrenal gland (adrenocorticotropic). They draw blood again at 30 minutes and then at 1 hour. I was at 12 when they drew the blood and then 16 at 30 min and 18 at an hour. The Endocrinologist said the results were great. Now just hoping all goes well with the tapering. These test normally have to be ordered and interpreted by an Endocrinologist. Mayo sent me to the in-house Endocrinologist and she said she would do any tests requested by Neurology.

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My dr wants me to start taking methatextrate because I have been in predizone so long . Got down to five mg and the sed rate and crp went back up. Your thoughts ?

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@654321

My dr wants me to start taking methatextrate because I have been in predizone so long . Got down to five mg and the sed rate and crp went back up. Your thoughts ?

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What is your present SED Rate and what was the highest it ever way?

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46 now that doesn t worry me as much as the crp.which 16.6

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Do you recall what the highest number ever was for your SED Rate?

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@654321

46 now that doesn t worry me as much as the crp.which 16.6

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Any chance that your cpr rate of 16.6 is a false positive???

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@654321

46 now that doesn t worry me as much as the crp.which 16.6

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Read the following and see if any of these factors may pertain to your elevated cpr rate:

It is important that any person having this test be in a healthy state for the results to be of value in predicting the risk of coronary disease or heart attack. Any recent illness, tissue injury, infection, or other general inflammation will raise the amount of CRP and give a falsely elevated estimate of risk.

Women on hormone replacement therapy have been shown to have elevated hs-CRP levels.

Since the hs-CRP and CRP tests measure the same protein, people with chronic inflammation, such as those with arthritis, should not have hs-CRP levels measured. Their CRP levels will already be very high due to the arthritis, so results of the hs-CRP test will not be meaningful.

Taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, e.g., aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen) or statins may reduce CRP levels in blood. Both anti-inflammatory drugs and statins may help to reduce inflammation, thus reducing CRP.

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@charann2000

Do you recall what the highest number ever was for your SED Rate?

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When first diagnosed about six years ago it was in the mid 70 s

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@charann2000

Read the following and see if any of these factors may pertain to your elevated cpr rate:

It is important that any person having this test be in a healthy state for the results to be of value in predicting the risk of coronary disease or heart attack. Any recent illness, tissue injury, infection, or other general inflammation will raise the amount of CRP and give a falsely elevated estimate of risk.

Women on hormone replacement therapy have been shown to have elevated hs-CRP levels.

Since the hs-CRP and CRP tests measure the same protein, people with chronic inflammation, such as those with arthritis, should not have hs-CRP levels measured. Their CRP levels will already be very high due to the arthritis, so results of the hs-CRP test will not be meaningful.

Taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, e.g., aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen) or statins may reduce CRP levels in blood. Both anti-inflammatory drugs and statins may help to reduce inflammation, thus reducing CRP.

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Thks good information. I just started getting crp rates but have always had sed rate measured

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@654321

When first diagnosed about six years ago it was in the mid 70 s

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You have certainly come down considerably from when you were first diagnosed….even if appears to be escalating a bit right now. My SED Rate was really mild compared to many of the people on this blog….It was 28 and flagged by the ER with two other components of the blood work also flagged at that same time. When I spoke with the initial RA doctor whom I have now dropped due to his attitude, my SED Rate was 28 and he told me that for a woman of my age then 69 years old that was nothing….he further told me that those SED Rate baselines were really for young people in their 20's so you can take it from there. I also did hear that from another healthcare professional….I don't know your age but you may want to also consider that bit of information.

My sister who is 65 years old and has advanced RA only detected about five or six years ago went on Methotrexate as well as Prednisone and Humira. I can tell you through speaking with her that Methotrexate is nothing to mess around with or be taken lightly as to the severe consequences of side effects. Most people are given only about 10-25 milligrams per week! What I am trying to say is double check if you really need to take this at all and watch out for the amount of dosage in the RX. Also, I am going to say something else here that some won't care to hear but be careful of doctor's that try to get you on too many drugs quickly….remember, they have guaranteed follow-up appointments every three months or so for every patient who is on a prescribed drug which is considered to be maintenance in nature….the bulk of some doctor's practices are made up of these types of patients….they are essentially their bread and butter to put it nicely. If you take Methotrexate you will probably have to have your blood work tested at those intervals also….some doctors have their own blood draw labs as part of their practice, which can further be a double dip for them! In the next few years the government is going to do away with doctor's having their own in-practice blood work labs….I think that they see problems of possible Medicare fraud with it!

I wish you the best and hope that you make some wise decisions for yourself and be your own best advocate!

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@charann2000

You have certainly come down considerably from when you were first diagnosed….even if appears to be escalating a bit right now. My SED Rate was really mild compared to many of the people on this blog….It was 28 and flagged by the ER with two other components of the blood work also flagged at that same time. When I spoke with the initial RA doctor whom I have now dropped due to his attitude, my SED Rate was 28 and he told me that for a woman of my age then 69 years old that was nothing….he further told me that those SED Rate baselines were really for young people in their 20's so you can take it from there. I also did hear that from another healthcare professional….I don't know your age but you may want to also consider that bit of information.

My sister who is 65 years old and has advanced RA only detected about five or six years ago went on Methotrexate as well as Prednisone and Humira. I can tell you through speaking with her that Methotrexate is nothing to mess around with or be taken lightly as to the severe consequences of side effects. Most people are given only about 10-25 milligrams per week! What I am trying to say is double check if you really need to take this at all and watch out for the amount of dosage in the RX. Also, I am going to say something else here that some won't care to hear but be careful of doctor's that try to get you on too many drugs quickly….remember, they have guaranteed follow-up appointments every three months or so for every patient who is on a prescribed drug which is considered to be maintenance in nature….the bulk of some doctor's practices are made up of these types of patients….they are essentially their bread and butter to put it nicely. If you take Methotrexate you will probably have to have your blood work tested at those intervals also….some doctors have their own blood draw labs as part of their practice, which can further be a double dip for them! In the next few years the government is going to do away with doctor's having their own in-practice blood work labs….I think that they see problems of possible Medicare fraud with it!

I wish you the best and hope that you make some wise decisions for yourself and be your own best advocate!

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Forgot to mention to you one very important consequence of taking Methotrexate it will take your overall immune system down, meaning you will be highly susceptible to infections, diseases, etc. the entire time you are on it!

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@charann2000

Forgot to mention to you one very important consequence of taking Methotrexate it will take your overall immune system down, meaning you will be highly susceptible to infections, diseases, etc. the entire time you are on it!

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I read that so thank you so much. Talked to my pharmacist and I am going stay in predizone 7 mg. It worked and I tolerate it well.

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I was 73 in June. Was first diagnosed about 6 years ago. Started with 40 mg of predizone then got it under control . It returned in 2016 I think. Started with 10 mg and got to 7.

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