Sugar has the potential to reduce your body's defenses

Posted by CW Holeman II @cwhii, Nov 16, 2019

A web site Deep Roots At Home in a post titled ‘Why Sugar Ages & Weakens You: What Happens When Throttled Back?’ states that:

‘EATING SUGARS OF ANY KIND HAS THE POTENTIAL TO REDUCE YOUR BODY’S DEFENSES BY 75% OR MORE FOR FOUR TO SIX HOURS.’

which can be found with a search for ‘deeprootsathome reasons-cut-sugar’

My first observation is that there is not quantitative values in the action side of the statement just on the results side. Ignoring that aspect of the assertion, what is the reality of the statement?

Yes, of course. Fasting blood sugar can be high because of stress or taking strong pain meds. In the nursing home they take your blood test early before you get up out of bed, even waking you up to do the vitals. Dorisena

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@johnbishop

Smell test means different things to different people. If many articles from many different sources point to sugar consumption causing health related problems, I'm going with trying to reduce my consumption but I do understand where you are coming from. I alway go back to statistics and numbers can be scewed to prove pretty much whatever you want to prove (with the caveat of most of the time ☺).

Fast food fever: reviewing the impacts of the Western diet on immunity
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4074336/

PubMed has a lot of docs on the topic
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=refined%20sugar%20immune%20system

Not sure I'm qualified to answer your original question but my thought is that it doesn't take too much to look at western culture like the U.S and other countries diet vs eastern culture to see that refined sugar consumption is a problem (IMHO). Dumb question on my part – are you looking for scientific proof to stop or reduce sugar intake, or is it just seeing the article you mentioned and not agreeing with their assumptions?

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I have no issue with reducing the excess of sugar consumption. It is the details in this specific article. It is what is being used to justify not eating A cookie when the start of a cold happens.

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@cwhii

The details about the context and results have quantitative values but what one does to provoke the problem has simply the word "some". This means nothing to me. Such incongruencies triggers a fail on the-smell-test. Also, the "can get substituted my mistake" does not produce a clean quantitative value for me.

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I remember the days of Dr. Pauling saying we needed lots of vitamin C to avoid colds. I had lots of sinus infections at the time so I drank lots of Tang, promoted by NASA and full of sugar. It did no good at all, and probably because of the sugar. I also remember that when I gave up carrot cake, ice cream and such my knees didn't have so much pain from inflammation, I think. That was before the knee replacements. This science of all this has not been available to us but in now coming to light as we examine the research and rely on facts rather than the craziness of the sixties and some of the Hippy ideas that didn't pan out at all. I know you are going to ask: what ideas? and I am thinking of the raw corn and unpasteurized honey goods. My friends put raw sweet corn in the freezer and wondered why it spoiled. Dorisena

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@lisalucier

Hi, @cwhii – welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. Thanks for sharing this information about sugar.

Mayo Clinic has a number of articles about sugar that may interest you. Here are a couple:

– About added sugar https://mayoclinichealthsystem.org/hometown-health/speaking-of-health/the-not-so-sweet-truth-about-added-sugar

– On curbing a sugar habit https://intheloop.mayoclinic.org/2019/02/21/when-it-comes-to-sugar-there-really-is-too-much-of-a-good-thing/

Are you considering reducing your sugar intake or have you made cuts in sugar in your diet? If so, how has your experience gone?

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I have cut any foods with added sugar from my diet and seen wonderful results. My inflammation increases greatly whenever I eat a cookie or a bit of cake. This may not only be because of the sugar per se; I have noticed that organic non-gmo sugar is less inflammatory making we wonder about pesticides and their adjuvants. Thanks for your wonderful question!

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@berdyaev11

I have cut any foods with added sugar from my diet and seen wonderful results. My inflammation increases greatly whenever I eat a cookie or a bit of cake. This may not only be because of the sugar per se; I have noticed that organic non-gmo sugar is less inflammatory making we wonder about pesticides and their adjuvants. Thanks for your wonderful question!

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We need to be careful about our assumptions with scientific issues like GMO because we are not getting the complete story at times, and we are not eating all the products that are affected by it's use. I am educated in the agricultural world but new studies come to light all the time. Agricultural people are not crooks or cheats, and want the same safe food as everyone else. Food in American is getting safer and safer, as we learn to use less chemicals, but foreign food is not always as safe. I don't eat soy products because of a test I had with breast cancer that showed I should avoid it. So I am satisfied with growing GMO soybeans for industrial use. There is no such thing as a perfectly safe food, as there are toxic chemicals occurring naturally in some foods. We also have naturally occurring unsafe water in some areas. It is a long story and we need to study and learn. Farmers are not the bad guys, because it is expensive to use new products so they want to be as careful as all consumers. Even steak on the grill can become toxic. I keep studying. Dorisena

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@berdyaev11

I have cut any foods with added sugar from my diet and seen wonderful results. My inflammation increases greatly whenever I eat a cookie or a bit of cake. This may not only be because of the sugar per se; I have noticed that organic non-gmo sugar is less inflammatory making we wonder about pesticides and their adjuvants. Thanks for your wonderful question!

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I am so glad to know someone else who thinks avoiding sugar decreases inflammation. Please don't mix the subject of pesticides and GMO's in one discussion, because they are two different issues. It bothers me that sugarcane is burned before being manufactured because of the possible toxic affects from burning. It gets very complicated to those of us who grow food and other products for non food use.
Today my blood sugar is down and I don't have pain. I''ll take it even though I don't understand it well. Dorisena

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Growing up as a young girl, the first thing I was taught to bake was cookies and pies, followed by making homemade fudge. Even though I was in Home Ec. classes in high school, and learned nutrition in 4-H cooking projects, nothing was ever mentioned about the possible harmful effects of eating too much sugar, or the fact that it has no nutritional value but can provide some energy. I am thankful to be able to learn more about good nutrition and its effects on our bodies and how to manage so we can become healthier and active in old age. This sounds obvious, but I am still angry that I was kept ignorant about food and didn't have the opportunity to learn best practices at an early age. My mother knew if you ate too much, you got fat, and that was about it. She said they got rid of the milk cow in the back shed after babies were weaned at about three years. Doctors are not excellent educators and don't have the time. Thank God we are learning better eating habits and exercising more. We don't grow much cane sugar in America but do grow sugar beets. It is enough. Dorisena

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@dorisena

We need to be careful about our assumptions with scientific issues like GMO because we are not getting the complete story at times, and we are not eating all the products that are affected by it's use. I am educated in the agricultural world but new studies come to light all the time. Agricultural people are not crooks or cheats, and want the same safe food as everyone else. Food in American is getting safer and safer, as we learn to use less chemicals, but foreign food is not always as safe. I don't eat soy products because of a test I had with breast cancer that showed I should avoid it. So I am satisfied with growing GMO soybeans for industrial use. There is no such thing as a perfectly safe food, as there are toxic chemicals occurring naturally in some foods. We also have naturally occurring unsafe water in some areas. It is a long story and we need to study and learn. Farmers are not the bad guys, because it is expensive to use new products so they want to be as careful as all consumers. Even steak on the grill can become toxic. I keep studying. Dorisena

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Good insights coming from your agricultural education. Since you are writing about misconceptions, my pet peeve is those that say it's ok to put on your skin or eat simply because it is "natural". It's good for you because it is natural. This is so misleading. Rubber is natural, yet I am allergic to it, cinnamon is natural yet I react not only from the fragrance, but internally it raises my histamines and as a topical causes a rash. Like you I react to soy beans, yet they are a good food source for many. Rubber is useful for those not allergic just as cinnamon is a delicious spice or fragrance for those not allergic. Each of us has to work at putting together our own jigsaw puzzle of our unique needs and poisons. That is why blogging on this site is helpful because we can learn from others with similar issues.

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I had a nutrition class in grad school where they taught us the natural carcinogens in some foods, showing that there was so such thing as a perfectly safe food for everyone.
We can tolerate some toxicity on some foods, so they set limits on known problems. Peanuts have a naturally occurring carcinogen and must be tested in America before they are used for peanut butter. Imported peanut butter may not have been strictly tested. I grew some peanuts one year in an unusually hot, long summer, roasted them and they tasted pretty good. Of course I couldn't test them. But they were natural! I shared them with my squirrels. Dorisena

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@dorisena

I had a nutrition class in grad school where they taught us the natural carcinogens in some foods, showing that there was so such thing as a perfectly safe food for everyone.
We can tolerate some toxicity on some foods, so they set limits on known problems. Peanuts have a naturally occurring carcinogen and must be tested in America before they are used for peanut butter. Imported peanut butter may not have been strictly tested. I grew some peanuts one year in an unusually hot, long summer, roasted them and they tasted pretty good. Of course I couldn't test them. But they were natural! I shared them with my squirrels. Dorisena

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I've never tried growing p-nuts and don't eat them because my anti-inflammation diet excludes them as they may be a source of mold being a ground nut, yet I spend plenty of money on whole in the shell raw unsalted p-nuts for my blue-jays who adore them. I may try growing them.

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You should live as far south as Virginia to grow peanuts, and I live in Central Ohio. They are a long season, sandy soil crop, and you need a place to dry them before baking them. I have the sandy soil, but won't try it again. I don't buy much for the birds because there is enough for them on the farm. The squirrels go into the field, drag the corn to my front yard, and eat away. Then I have to pick up the cobs. In the winter I feed birds but not Blue Jays because they chase away the other birds. I never saw an anti-inflammation diet, but the allergist said I shouldn't eat peanuts. I have always eaten them anyway.
I do know that sugar makes my knees ache, however they have both been replaced. I am not going to give up milk, either. I ate peanut butter at night to cure my low blood sugar years ago and it worked. When our business burned down in the middle of the night, I sucked on peanut butter to keep from fainting.
Protein is the big help in both low and high blood sugar. Peanut butter absorbs slowly. Dorisena

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You've been though many struggles and have learned much. Birds give many of us an enjoyable pass time when some activities are restricted due to health issues. I have favorite bird watching stations where I can sit quietly in my yard and also a favorite window seat in my homes so no need to go outside.
I know the Jays are nest robbers of eggs, they love the calcium they get from the shell but my main residence in the Ozarks is a bird haven. Yet they are such characters and so beautiful and I love the large family groups of jays that show up for their morning feast of p-nuts. The woods are loaded with nut trees and acorns, but they adore the p-nut and take them and stash them for the winter. We have abundance of Cardinals and finches year round, plus flocks of wild turkey. MO has the Bluebird as the state bird and I get the meal worms from my compost pile and the Bluebirds go"nuts" over them. We have a long list of woodpeckers and the dramatic pre-historic looking Pilated usually nest accross the street from me in the woods. Their bird call is very distinctive We have prolific native cone flowers the Gold Finch's feast on and I have seen flocks of Goldfinches in the hundreds. We have more Gold Finches than any other type of finch. Road Runners, Wood Thrush and Thrashers plus endless more year-round. In addition all the migrating birds: Robins, Indigo Bunting, various hawks and Bald Eagles, assorted water fowl and fortunately the geese just stay adjacent to the the lake shore and don't make it into my property- they are messy and destructive. Honestly I can't begin to list all the bird types. In AZ I get at least 100 Gambil Quail who come in for breakfast and I make a special peanut butter, corn meal and bird seed mix I mix up and put on a peanut butter feeder and the sparrows, finches and Thrasher's only get about a generous cup daily which is gone by noon. They line up for it! Enjoy your birds!

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