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fekind
@fekind

Posts: 4
Joined: Sep 02, 2016

Stroke survivor - always hungry

Posted by @fekind, Sep 1, 2016

My fiancé who is only 37 yrs old had a massive hemorrhage stroke on the right of of the brain in October 2015. She still has left side paralysis, but making some progress. One of her major issues is weight gain which is making her recovery more difficult. She is experiencing a feeling of always being hungry and has not had the feeling of being full since her stroke. She also does not remember what and when she eats. I continually remind her of what she ate, portions and the time she ate. I have tried recording everything she eats so she realizes how much she is consuming, but she doesn’t have any interest and is only concerned about how hungry she is at the moment.

We have inquired with her neurological Doctor, family doctor and brain surgeon, but none of them have offered any solutions. Her family doctor suggested a wellness plan, but I know she will not follow it.

This hunger issue is also causing her frequent emotional breakdowns.

Any suggestions would be appreciated!

REPLY

Hi @fekind,
This must be so stressful for you and your fiancé. I’m bringing @soitis4590 @IndianaScott @chesneydell1965 @carer into this conversation about stroke. They have all had experience with stroke as a patient or caregiver. I wonder if they have had any experience with increased appetite after stroke.

Fekind, did your partner work with a stroke rehab team? http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/stroke/in-depth/stroke-rehabilitation/art-20045172

@colleenyoung

Hi @fekind,
This must be so stressful for you and your fiancé. I’m bringing @soitis4590 @IndianaScott @chesneydell1965 @carer into this conversation about stroke. They have all had experience with stroke as a patient or caregiver. I wonder if they have had any experience with increased appetite after stroke.

Fekind, did your partner work with a stroke rehab team? http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/stroke/in-depth/stroke-rehabilitation/art-20045172

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@colleenyoung, yes, she worked with Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan (R.I.M), both for inpatient and outpatient.

@fekind I’m so sorry to hear of your fiancée’s problems with hunger and eating. I was just wondering about her past history of eating. Prior to her stroke what were her eating habits like? Any problems with restriction of food or compulsive over-eating? Also, sometimes meds can cause an increase in appetite. Her current problems might be a combination of medication side-effects as well as the stroke. I noticed that you live in Michigan and I was wondering if you have consulted the Mary Free Bed organization. Michigan has some great rehab facilities. There are also specific therapies to help with cognitive recovery programs. I hope that as you continue to seek answers you will find encouragement and help. Best wishes! Teresa

@hopeful33250

@fekind I’m so sorry to hear of your fiancée’s problems with hunger and eating. I was just wondering about her past history of eating. Prior to her stroke what were her eating habits like? Any problems with restriction of food or compulsive over-eating? Also, sometimes meds can cause an increase in appetite. Her current problems might be a combination of medication side-effects as well as the stroke. I noticed that you live in Michigan and I was wondering if you have consulted the Mary Free Bed organization. Michigan has some great rehab facilities. There are also specific therapies to help with cognitive recovery programs. I hope that as you continue to seek answers you will find encouragement and help. Best wishes! Teresa

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Thank you, Theresa. Prior to her stroke, she loved food, but she was very desciplined. In fact, she would often throw out unhealthy foods to ensure she didn’t binge eat. She was taking a low dose of Zoloft which can cause increased appetite, her doctor put her on Celexa instead, but there has been no change. I will look into the Mary Free Bed Organization.

@hopeful33250

@fekind I’m so sorry to hear of your fiancée’s problems with hunger and eating. I was just wondering about her past history of eating. Prior to her stroke what were her eating habits like? Any problems with restriction of food or compulsive over-eating? Also, sometimes meds can cause an increase in appetite. Her current problems might be a combination of medication side-effects as well as the stroke. I noticed that you live in Michigan and I was wondering if you have consulted the Mary Free Bed organization. Michigan has some great rehab facilities. There are also specific therapies to help with cognitive recovery programs. I hope that as you continue to seek answers you will find encouragement and help. Best wishes! Teresa

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Hi again @fekind. I have been thinking about your post and it helped me remember my wife also had significant swings in her eating habits. One of the areas of her brain, which was damaged by her tumor, must have been her appetite control function. It changed in many ways over years. This included radical changes in volume, likes and dislikes, etc. She also began needing far fewer calories burned so she had weight gain quickly. The way I could help was by eliminating as many high calorie and empty calorie foods from our kitchen as possible. Side benefit? I began to eat healthier too 🙂

Try offering more frequent but smaller amounts of foods that you know she really likes, make yourself the same and eat them together making it a pleasant time where the experience is something she will look forward to. I’m not sure I’m clear about what the problem is…your wife not eating enough or to much? Your post was a bit unclear. Hope I helped a little. Best wishes to your wife. To be a stroke victim at age 37 is an incredible challenge and I hope she will continue to improve so you can share many happy years together.

@hopeful33250

@fekind I’m so sorry to hear of your fiancée’s problems with hunger and eating. I was just wondering about her past history of eating. Prior to her stroke what were her eating habits like? Any problems with restriction of food or compulsive over-eating? Also, sometimes meds can cause an increase in appetite. Her current problems might be a combination of medication side-effects as well as the stroke. I noticed that you live in Michigan and I was wondering if you have consulted the Mary Free Bed organization. Michigan has some great rehab facilities. There are also specific therapies to help with cognitive recovery programs. I hope that as you continue to seek answers you will find encouragement and help. Best wishes! Teresa

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@fekind Thanks for your reply. You provided some good insight into her prior eating habits. This information might serve her well during your next consultation. Please keep me posted on how she (and you!) are doing. I hope that you can find some additional help at the Mary Free Bed Hospital. Best wishes. Teresa

@cynthiag thank you for the advice. To clarify, she is constantly hungry and never feels satisfied after eating.

I’ve had a stroke, and ya, i love to eat, i always say, too bad i like My own cooking, im a good cook , lol

Is she on any medications that may have increased her appetite? I know I have been on a sleep medication that would wake me up in the middle of the night and I would eat, and not remember doing so? Just a thought…

@kariulrich Thanks for sharing the experience you had – certainly “food for thought.” (No pun intended). Teresa

Hello, I hope this find you well. I was wondering if you ever found a reason for the always being hungry?
My brother 44 had a tumor on his pituitary gland and due to complications had two major strokes the largest being on the left side. He has to take hormones long story. The hunger thing totally controls ever min of every day. He also has no short term memory. So no matter how many times we tell him this is what you had. His hunger trumps everything.
Did you find any info??

Hello @fekind

Please feel free to update us, if are comfortable doing so, about your fiancé’s progress.

We would be interested in knowing if you found an answer for the intense hunger problem that your fiancé experienced following her stroke.

Teresa

No one mentioned anything about drinking water. There are times we think we are hungry when we really are thirsty. Before every meal we should start with a glass of water, just plain old water. I had two strokes the end of 2014, on the left side, and had to force myself to eat. I still have to remind myself to eat so I can take my meds, which have to be taken with food – excuse me I had to take a break to get a drink of water.

Have you seen a dietitian? I had lost weight after I had my strokes and wanted to gain good weight, not bad weight. I was told to eat a snack every 2-3 hours and 2 or 3 small meals a day. There are a lot of healthy snacks under 100 calories out there. For people who never liked, or drank water, drinking over 2 liters of water every day is very hard.
mlmcg

@brglassworks

Hello, I hope this find you well. I was wondering if you ever found a reason for the always being hungry?
My brother 44 had a tumor on his pituitary gland and due to complications had two major strokes the largest being on the left side. He has to take hormones long story. The hunger thing totally controls ever min of every day. He also has no short term memory. So no matter how many times we tell him this is what you had. His hunger trumps everything.
Did you find any info??

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Hi @brglassworks
Welcome to Connect. I hope that others in this discussion will return to offer advice about hunger and stroke. In the meantime, I also want to let you know about a couple of discussions about pituitary tumors in the Brain Tumor group. Please see:
– Looking for others with Pituitary Adenoma https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/i-like-to-now-if-their-is-anyone-who-has-been-diagnosed/
– Video Q&A about Pituitary Tumors https://connect.mayoclinic.org/webinar/pituitary-tumors-26deda/

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