Stim wave procedure for chronic abdominal pain

Posted by quark @quark, Feb 29 7:20am

Presently scheduled for the trial of Stim Wave for chronic abdominal pain near my urinary stoma. Have tried the gamut of meds and interventional procedures to no avail. I hate taking opioids, and they just mellow me , and can't really go out much. I know every one reacts differently, but just looking for feedback regarding Stim Wave, the pros and cons. Thanx in advance.

I'd like to bring @wsh66 @ken82 @astaingegerdm and @jimhd into this discussion.

@quark has your doctor indicated that you may be a candidate for an implantable device to help relieve chronic abdominal pain?

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Yes, he thought I would be a very good candidate, and am scheduled for the trial application of it on April 10. It's MRI compatible, and should not have a problem with lead migration either. I have tried all the other medications, injections, sacral plexus shot, spinal cord stimulator, etc.

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I have an Abbott Burst DR spinal cord stimulator implant, for peripheral polyneuropathy in my feet. This is the first time I've heard of using a stimulator for abdominal pain. The trial should be a good indicator of what to expect. Like you, I've tried so many meds and other treatments that I can't remember them all. I hope you have good results with the stim wave.

Jim

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Thanks Jim, and am glad it's helping you. The one I am supposed to get is not a spinal cord stimulator, but is inserted near the pain problem, and controlled by some kind of unit worn like a belt. A few years ago, I did try a scary (Boston Medtronic) but did nothing. It's relatively new and think it was started about 2014.

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@quark

Yes, he thought I would be a very good candidate, and am scheduled for the trial application of it on April 10. It's MRI compatible, and should not have a problem with lead migration either. I have tried all the other medications, injections, sacral plexus shot, spinal cord stimulator, etc.

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@quark My Nevro HF10 is also MRI compatible but that's not as simple as it sounds. First I must have my 16 electrodes tested for electrical resistance. That requires a short test with the Nevro rep (when she's in town). Then she certifies that I'm OK for an MRI. But, neither the local hospital system nor local imaging centers will give me an MRI if I have an SCS, so I have to travel 1 hr. north to one that will, in Savannah. There I present my certificate and turn off my SCS before entering the room with the MRI. After that, it's business as usual. It's not the product that's the problem but the knowledge of SCSs by the people running the centers.

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@scruffy1

@quark My Nevro HF10 is also MRI compatible but that's not as simple as it sounds. First I must have my 16 electrodes tested for electrical resistance. That requires a short test with the Nevro rep (when she's in town). Then she certifies that I'm OK for an MRI. But, neither the local hospital system nor local imaging centers will give me an MRI if I have an SCS, so I have to travel 1 hr. north to one that will, in Savannah. There I present my certificate and turn off my SCS before entering the room with the MRI. After that, it's business as usual. It's not the product that's the problem but the knowledge of SCSs by the people running the centers.

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@scruffy1 My scs from St. Jude (now owned by Abbott) was supposed to be MRI compatible, but it wasn't for a couple of years. They finally got the update online last year which makes my scs MRI compatible. I had 2 MRIs on hold, so I had them both done a week after the update was programmed to my device. After the second one I forgot to turn the scs back on until 3 weeks later.

Jim

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@scruffy1

@quark My Nevro HF10 is also MRI compatible but that's not as simple as it sounds. First I must have my 16 electrodes tested for electrical resistance. That requires a short test with the Nevro rep (when she's in town). Then she certifies that I'm OK for an MRI. But, neither the local hospital system nor local imaging centers will give me an MRI if I have an SCS, so I have to travel 1 hr. north to one that will, in Savannah. There I present my certificate and turn off my SCS before entering the room with the MRI. After that, it's business as usual. It's not the product that's the problem but the knowledge of SCSs by the people running the centers.

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Scuffy 1. Thanx for the heads up, and will keep that in mind if I need a MRI, and will be going for the trial April 10. Mine won't be a spinal cord stimulator, but uses similar technology, I think, They always make it sound easier than it is.

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@colleenyoung

I'd like to bring @wsh66 @ken82 @astaingegerdm and @jimhd into this discussion.

@quark has your doctor indicated that you may be a candidate for an implantable device to help relieve chronic abdominal pain?

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I know nothing about abdominal pain. The implantable pump I have is for pain connected to the spine as that is where the catheter leaks the narcotic. I have my doubts about implanted stimulators. If I had abdominal pain I'd see about my digestion and my diet. What specialist deals with those issues and do they recommend implantable devices? I'd be interested to know.

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The abdominal pain I have is from my cystectomy and/or inguinal hernia repair, or a combination of both. It's nerve pain, diagnosed and have seen internists, neurologists, my oncology urologist, and general surgeon. Treatment or remedies have been different medications, injections (both local and by the spine, trial for spinal cord stimulator. Stim wave may be similar to scs, but is much smaller, and is inserted near the origin of the pain, in my case to the right of my stoma, no where near the spine. And it's a pain mgmt doctor whom I am seeing. Nothing to do with digestion and diet at all.

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I spoke to Dr Park at MHealth in Mpls. MN today, concerning the use of a pump like mine for abdominal pain. I was having my pain pump refiled. He says that the implanted intrathecal pain pump works on pain all over the body and in almost all cases would be appropriate for abdominal pain. If my pain guy only did stimulators I would have kept looking until I found one who did the pump. I was tested for the stimulator and it was useless. I wasn't having surgery to get something that didn't work. Search these chats for me, wsh66/pain pump and read about them. Getting the pump is like hitting the lottery for pain patients. 4 mgs. per day leaked into my spinal fluid over 24 hrs. plus a very small oral dose works better than the 252 mgs. I used to eat everyday. No side effects. They test you by giving you a spinal injection to see how you respond. Gene Sight testing can predict which narcotic you will metabolize the best. That's a brand name, Gene Sight. Go to there website to find a doctor who is qualified to do the cheek swab and then make the report part of your medical records. Good Luck

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@wsh66

I spoke to Dr Park at MHealth in Mpls. MN today, concerning the use of a pump like mine for abdominal pain. I was having my pain pump refiled. He says that the implanted intrathecal pain pump works on pain all over the body and in almost all cases would be appropriate for abdominal pain. If my pain guy only did stimulators I would have kept looking until I found one who did the pump. I was tested for the stimulator and it was useless. I wasn't having surgery to get something that didn't work. Search these chats for me, wsh66/pain pump and read about them. Getting the pump is like hitting the lottery for pain patients. 4 mgs. per day leaked into my spinal fluid over 24 hrs. plus a very small oral dose works better than the 252 mgs. I used to eat everyday. No side effects. They test you by giving you a spinal injection to see how you respond. Gene Sight testing can predict which narcotic you will metabolize the best. That's a brand name, Gene Sight. Go to there website to find a doctor who is qualified to do the cheek swab and then make the report part of your medical records. Good Luck

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Thanks very much, Steve. The one I am currently using, pain doc, has tried medications, sacral plexus injections, and local injections with cortisone. If I remember correctly, he did mention the pump awhile ago, but I think he said Medicare does not cover the medication. I will be seeing him in a couple of weeks, before Stim Wave trial, and ask him directly. Prior pain docs have tried SCS, Boston medtronics, and did zippo. Also, radio frequency ablation too, and obviously didn't work. I will check out the Gene Site too, and thanx

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@quark

Thanks very much, Steve. The one I am currently using, pain doc, has tried medications, sacral plexus injections, and local injections with cortisone. If I remember correctly, he did mention the pump awhile ago, but I think he said Medicare does not cover the medication. I will be seeing him in a couple of weeks, before Stim Wave trial, and ask him directly. Prior pain docs have tried SCS, Boston medtronics, and did zippo. Also, radio frequency ablation too, and obviously didn't work. I will check out the Gene Site too, and thanx

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Medicare does cover the medication. Some people think it doesn't because they don't code it right when they build for it. My clinic had trouble with that when they change Personnel but they've got it straightened out again.

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