Resound or Oticon?

Posted by sparklegram @sparklegram, Aug 4, 2019

Good morning everyone. I'm getting new hearing aids and Friday I saw my audiologist. I'm testing Resound first and then I'll try Oticon. She said these two are her "go-to" brands. Has anyone had experience with these two brands, and if so, do you have an opinion about them? It's been awhile since I bought my last pair which were Phonaks. Technology has changed drastically, so the learning curve seems huge to me! I'd appreciate your thoughts and experiences.

@colleenyoung

FYI: the is an additional and very informative discussion about t-coils that may interest the group here:

– Do you know about Telecoils & Hearing Loops in Public Spaces? https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/do-you-know-about-telecoils-hearing-loops-in-public-spaces/

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Thank you for bringing this older conversation back. There's a lot of excellent information in the discussion. This is an issue that is bound to resurface fairly often because of the 'ah ha' moment someone with hearing loss experiences the first time they try telecoils with a hearing loop. It's hard to explain the emotions that surface when someone with hearing loss suddenly hears better with their hearing aids then they ever have before. The emotions include amazement at the clarity of hearing, but all too often include a different kind of amazement when one realizes they had not been told about this technology when they purchased those expensive hearing aids. As a long time member of HLAA, I have seen this magical moment many times. I've also seen the disappointment and pure frustration when a person has to say "I don't know if I have telecoils." It gets worse when they return to an HLAA meeting after going back to their provider only to say "My hearing aids don't have telecoils." It just doesn't make sense to NOT share this feature with customers who have come to you because they are frustrated by hearing loss. Yes, it takes time to teach and counsel, but isn't that what a helping professional does?

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The Resound external microphones can only connect to one receiver (e.g., your hearing aid), whereas Oticon can connect to multiple receivers. The huge reason you want to connect to multiple receivers is that way you can use your phone/tablet/laptop and the website http://www.streamer.center to view a live captioning of what someone is saying. You can do that with Oticon and Phonak, you can't do that with Resound.

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Has anyone tried Starkey hearing aids. I have had 2 different pairs of Sra key for about 10 years now. I have a major problem talking/listening on the phone. They keep squeking and beeping. I'm about to get new hearing aids and am cinsidering the half shell model because of greater directional hearing capability. What I don't know about this model is hearing capability on the phone and/or distracting noisw.
Dick B.

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Are you using your hearing aid's telecoil on the phone? It doesn't sound like it. Quite possibly your Starkey aids do not have built in telecoils. They are kind of like cars without air conditioning….you only need it when you need it….not all the time. When you buy your new hearing aids, regardless of brand, insist on telecoils that you can manually adjust, and also on volume controls you can manually adjust. Don't let your provider talk you out of those options. Then learn how to use them, and be in charge of managing your hearing loss.

Liked by bookysue

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@tmclain

Don't know about Resound, but Oticon is little more than an extremely high priced amplifier. They promise the world, but deliver little more than a pebble. The ONLY thing that works as they claim is the connectivity. I can make phone calls on my iPhone and listen to music from my iPhone. Other than that, I hear nothing but noise, and very loud noise at that. On top of that, Oticon doesn't really care if their expensive amplifiers work as claimed. People First, not hardly. Money First – you bet.

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You are 100% correct >>> "They promise the world, but deliver little more than a pebble." My Oticon (for profound loss) is only a few weeks old & I can hardly hear people; and don't mention phone calls. It is frustrating. Indeed, you are 100% right: "People First, not hardly. Money First – you bet."

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@probonopublico

You are 100% correct >>> "They promise the world, but deliver little more than a pebble." My Oticon (for profound loss) is only a few weeks old & I can hardly hear people; and don't mention phone calls. It is frustrating. Indeed, you are 100% right: "People First, not hardly. Money First – you bet."

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Curious sorry- were you not a candidate for cochlear implants? Very few hearing aids works well for profound- my loss at a moderate to Severe level has very few powerfulaids that will work for me. More importantly go back to the audiologist and tell him/ her what’s happen. If he or she states cannot help you report the person – if is working with you to help you learn- tweak your aids to change the parameters set up – will change aid even – that’s a good audiologist- There is a learning curve- learning to hear with your aids- finding out and communicating with you whereas you’re problems are – they can reprogram your aid according. My aids had to be tweaked a lot before my resounds works the way I need them to. My aids are 15 and 13 years old. Hopes this helps

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@julieo4

Thank you for bringing this older conversation back. There's a lot of excellent information in the discussion. This is an issue that is bound to resurface fairly often because of the 'ah ha' moment someone with hearing loss experiences the first time they try telecoils with a hearing loop. It's hard to explain the emotions that surface when someone with hearing loss suddenly hears better with their hearing aids then they ever have before. The emotions include amazement at the clarity of hearing, but all too often include a different kind of amazement when one realizes they had not been told about this technology when they purchased those expensive hearing aids. As a long time member of HLAA, I have seen this magical moment many times. I've also seen the disappointment and pure frustration when a person has to say "I don't know if I have telecoils." It gets worse when they return to an HLAA meeting after going back to their provider only to say "My hearing aids don't have telecoils." It just doesn't make sense to NOT share this feature with customers who have come to you because they are frustrated by hearing loss. Yes, it takes time to teach and counsel, but isn't that what a helping professional does?

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Ongoing issue that I hear at the conventions ( HLAA) the last 3 years that no matter the brand folks are not told t coils. I wish there was a way to be it a legal mandate for Audiologists to make sure to mention this when selling aids. I have taught my audiologists that I used t coils at restaurants ( yes I know) it works sometimes in hearing the person better. I done with TVs too- it works for me . My aids are old- 13 and 15 year old resound .

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@bookysue

Ongoing issue that I hear at the conventions ( HLAA) the last 3 years that no matter the brand folks are not told t coils. I wish there was a way to be it a legal mandate for Audiologists to make sure to mention this when selling aids. I have taught my audiologists that I used t coils at restaurants ( yes I know) it works sometimes in hearing the person better. I done with TVs too- it works for me . My aids are old- 13 and 15 year old resound .

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Hi bookysue, I can attest to your comment. I am currently testing an Oticon and I had to ask three times (at the same appt) to have the tcoil switched on!

Liked by bookysue

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@bookysue

Curious sorry- were you not a candidate for cochlear implants? Very few hearing aids works well for profound- my loss at a moderate to Severe level has very few powerfulaids that will work for me. More importantly go back to the audiologist and tell him/ her what’s happen. If he or she states cannot help you report the person – if is working with you to help you learn- tweak your aids to change the parameters set up – will change aid even – that’s a good audiologist- There is a learning curve- learning to hear with your aids- finding out and communicating with you whereas you’re problems are – they can reprogram your aid according. My aids had to be tweaked a lot before my resounds works the way I need them to. My aids are 15 and 13 years old. Hopes this helps

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There are a handful of states that have successfully created legislation that requires those who sell hearing aids to share information about the telecoil option, AND demonstrate how it works to all clients. All of that legislation has happened because HLAA members in those states have educated about it and advocated for it. I live in Wisconsin where we are currently working on this legislation. It isn't easy because of the process and procedure required to educate, provide information and do the advocacy. Legislation takes time. It doesn't happen in a vacuum. And, it's only going to happen IF people will get involved. This is an issue for the hard of hearing population. While the Deaf population may help you in your state, don't count on it. They have an entirely different agenda that is all about American Sign Language. The Deaf population counts on using the numbers of the entire 'hearing impaired' population to advocate. (48 million people with hearing loss.) That leads legislators to think that providing ASL is enough, and is the answer to communication access. I am all for the culturally Deaf, ASL dependent population having communication access, but I am not in favor of hard of hearing people getting left in the shuffle because legislators don't get the whole picture. (There are fewer than 2 million of that 48 million group that use ASL. The other 46 million use technology.) The issue of telecoils, hearing loops, and other technology accommodations is easily pushed aside. We are invisible. WE, who need these technologies have to be willing to fight for them.

Liked by tonyinmi, bookysue

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@bookysue

Curious sorry- were you not a candidate for cochlear implants? Very few hearing aids works well for profound- my loss at a moderate to Severe level has very few powerfulaids that will work for me. More importantly go back to the audiologist and tell him/ her what’s happen. If he or she states cannot help you report the person – if is working with you to help you learn- tweak your aids to change the parameters set up – will change aid even – that’s a good audiologist- There is a learning curve- learning to hear with your aids- finding out and communicating with you whereas you’re problems are – they can reprogram your aid according. My aids had to be tweaked a lot before my resounds works the way I need them to. My aids are 15 and 13 years old. Hopes this helps

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I have similar problems trying to get more information on Orcon for very low vision people. The very HARD SELL they push and the $5,000.00 price has me running away as far as I can. There are others for $10,000.00 and on and on. I am preparing a very special place for them and onlookers such as you and I can watch them squirm for free. Crooks, liars, etc., etc. I know so many people such as you and I who have been taken for $5,000 (and more) for hearing aids and eyeglasses that DO NOT REALLY WORK AS THEY SHOULD. May god save them from their misguided actions.

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Wow. -ADA -Americans with Disabilities act addressed deaf and wheelchair accessibility in 1994? I as an hearing challenged person have constant trouble in letting understand Sign Language is not the answer for me ( had this issue recently at a political rally stating they have interpreters). Constant issues. I am fighting in Phila for emails/ text appts at Drs. Big hassle. We have come a long way because of HLAA and other stubborn folks. The t coil in aids are essential because loops in railroads,at meetings- it’s makes a big difference in our lives. It coils in aids in every state someday- it can happen sooner by writing to representatives. Bluetooth is not the same as tcoil which audiologist is telling Folks to get. . Sorry for long bit- thanks Julie

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I'd like to add something to the discussion about telecoils. Due to COVID-19 we all have some time on our hands. I challenge everyone who uses hearing aids with telecoils to let us know how you use them. I wonder how many of you have a "Neckloop" to go with your telecoil equipped hearing aids? IMHO, this device should be included in the sale of all hearing aids that have telecoils. All who are participating on Mayo Clinic Connect are obviously using computers or Smartphones. So you have the perfect opportunity to use a neckloop. (Try a few You Tubes.) Those 'ah ha' moments that happen when someone first tries using telecoils in a looped room are also common when using a neckloop. A neckloop is a personal hearing loop that you wear around your neck and plug into an audio device. It works with computers, portable radio, iPods, etc. It works with Smartphones, but you may have to purchase an adapter to plug it in. When Apple dropped the standard input jack to make their phones slimmer, I had to purchase an adapter. Interestingly, the first one I bought cost me $35! I managed to misplace it and looked on Amazon for a replacement. Cost was $8. A neckloop itself will cost you around $50. I have had good luck with the standard Williams Sound neckloop. It does not require batteries. There are neckloops that use batteries that have controls that allow you to control the volume. My personal hearing devices have volume controls so I don't need that in a neckloop. I strongly encourage you to buy and use a neckloop. It's a lifesaver for me in many situations. Just used it in a ZOOM conference with my laptop. Worked great! This is where people who sell hearing aids fall short. They don't all take the time to share this information with their clients. God Bless those who do, as they are the providers we should go to.

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@bookysue

Wow. -ADA -Americans with Disabilities act addressed deaf and wheelchair accessibility in 1994? I as an hearing challenged person have constant trouble in letting understand Sign Language is not the answer for me ( had this issue recently at a political rally stating they have interpreters). Constant issues. I am fighting in Phila for emails/ text appts at Drs. Big hassle. We have come a long way because of HLAA and other stubborn folks. The t coil in aids are essential because loops in railroads,at meetings- it’s makes a big difference in our lives. It coils in aids in every state someday- it can happen sooner by writing to representatives. Bluetooth is not the same as tcoil which audiologist is telling Folks to get. . Sorry for long bit- thanks Julie

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Important to understand that BlueTooth does not replace telecoils. You can have both.

Liked by tonyinmi

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@julieo4

Important to understand that BlueTooth does not replace telecoils. You can have both.

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I know – whole different thing- it means with Bluetooth I am connected to my phone music thing and pretend I am hearing someone – or for phone access direct
T coil- connects with loops- wires set up for that-

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@julieo4

There are a handful of states that have successfully created legislation that requires those who sell hearing aids to share information about the telecoil option, AND demonstrate how it works to all clients. All of that legislation has happened because HLAA members in those states have educated about it and advocated for it. I live in Wisconsin where we are currently working on this legislation. It isn't easy because of the process and procedure required to educate, provide information and do the advocacy. Legislation takes time. It doesn't happen in a vacuum. And, it's only going to happen IF people will get involved. This is an issue for the hard of hearing population. While the Deaf population may help you in your state, don't count on it. They have an entirely different agenda that is all about American Sign Language. The Deaf population counts on using the numbers of the entire 'hearing impaired' population to advocate. (48 million people with hearing loss.) That leads legislators to think that providing ASL is enough, and is the answer to communication access. I am all for the culturally Deaf, ASL dependent population having communication access, but I am not in favor of hard of hearing people getting left in the shuffle because legislators don't get the whole picture. (There are fewer than 2 million of that 48 million group that use ASL. The other 46 million use technology.) The issue of telecoils, hearing loops, and other technology accommodations is easily pushed aside. We are invisible. WE, who need these technologies have to be willing to fight for them.

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I was not going to read this but with the new info that I am losing my hearing I had best read to learn. So thank you for this information.

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