Recent noise-induced hearing loss. Anything I can do?

Posted by cudabinacontenda @cudabinacontenda, Jun 5 7:15pm

I had an MRI of my head 4 days ago, and the noise-canceling headphones were likely not on my head properly. The test was short but very loud in one ear. My hearing is somewhat muted, and I have a feeling of moderate fullness in that ear. Is there anything I can do to regain my hearing or at least minimize the loss? Is there any hope it will recover naturally?

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Hi @cudabinacontenda, I'm bringing @julieo4 @mattie1014 @ken82 and @ladyofthelake into this discussion to see if they have thoughts for you. Like @arrowshooter said elsewhere, the question seems simple but the answer may be more complicated.

@aba has been collecting studies and information in this related discussion here:
– Does hearing continue to deteriorate after exposure to noise stops? https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/long-year-hearing-loss/

@cudabinacontenda, it's been 10 days since the noise impact. Has your hearing returned? Partially? Completely?

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Hi Colleen: thank you so much for responding. The fullness in my ear has diminished, although I still feel that my hearing is reduced. I realize that I also have a degree of hyperacusis. I simply dropped a nail clipper in a bowl sink and saw stars. I had an audiology test that showed some minor hearing loss at higher frequencies. The tympanograms were normal, but I need someone to better explain the “reflex” part of the test because my affected ear appears worse than the other. I’m also looking for a new ENT because the one I went to was ultimately a jerk. He completely dismissed my MRI story as though that never happens. I was really surprised and disappointed. He started treating me for ETD, but one 30mg dose of Sudafed made my ear feel worse. I don’t know why I agreed to that. I know what my experience in the MRI was better than he does. I’m sure my symptoms are entirely due to that, although I’m sure anxiety is making them worse. Again, I really appreciate you following up with me.

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@colleenyoung

Hi @cudabinacontenda, I'm bringing @julieo4 @mattie1014 @ken82 and @ladyofthelake into this discussion to see if they have thoughts for you. Like @arrowshooter said elsewhere, the question seems simple but the answer may be more complicated.

@aba has been collecting studies and information in this related discussion here:
– Does hearing continue to deteriorate after exposure to noise stops? https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/long-year-hearing-loss/

@cudabinacontenda, it's been 10 days since the noise impact. Has your hearing returned? Partially? Completely?

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Btw, I also was diagnosed with a retracted eardrum, which likely explains his ETD diagnosis, but after my moderately good audiology report, the ENT quizzically said he’s questioning his diagnosis. I don’t understand — he either saw it or he didn’t! Also, I think loud noise exposure can also cause a retracted eardrum. Is that true?

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Quite possibly the noise from the MRI did some damage, but that is rather unusual. Whether it's temporary or permanent is not yet known. Generally, noise induced hearing loss happens when there is substantial duration to loud noise, in a noisy work environment or via personal devices that pump it into the ear canal; loud sounds a person is exposed to frequently for long lengths of time.

Extreme noise such as attending a rock concert, a gun shot or explosion close to a person may also cause sudden noise indued hearing loss. No duration there as it is sudden and extreme.

It seems that some people are affected by it but others are not. A person doesn't know if they are among the percentage that is more easily affected until it happens.

Sudden sensorineural hearing loss comes as a shock because it's so unexpected. Most people who experience sensorineural hearing loss with adult onset, experience it gradually. The emotional experience is quite different.

Prevention of further hearing loss is extremely important. It makes sense to use caution when being exposed to noise. Use ear plugs, avoid loud activities if possible. Protect your hearing. By so doing, noise induced hearing loss probably won't deteriorate further if you use ear plugs and take other precautions around extreme noise. If it is the slowly progressive kind, it will probably continue to worsen, but may worsen more slowly if you avoid extreme noise.

Did you ask the ENT you are seeing about hearing protection?

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