Does hearing continue to deteriorate after exposure to noise stops?

Posted by aba @aba, Nov 6, 2021

please try to help
When hearing impaired (especially at a young age), whether it is from loud music or being in a noisy environment (a soldier in NOISY AREA for years)

Does the hearing continue to deteriorate even after you stop being in a noisy environment? Or if noise stops also stops a continuous decrease Is there a difference, regarding the continued deterioration in hearing, between acoustic damage resulting from a sudden noise (explosion for example) and which has not disappeared,

And permanent acoustic sabotage after several years of exposure to noise and the hearing deterioration continues though slowly?

M PELEG

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Hearing Loss group.

Noise induced hearing loss is not reversible. Continued damage can be prevented by using ear plugs and avoiding extreme noise. If your hearing has deteriorated due to noise exposure, you already know you are prone to hearing loss. It's up to you to protect it.

REPLY

Hi @aba You brought up some interesting questions about hearing loss. From what I’m reading, hearing loss does not progress once the noise level has been reduced.

I found some informational articles that might shed some light on the differences between acoustical damage and other factors which can result in hearing impairment.

The following is an excerpt from an article provided by the Workman’s Compensation Board of Alberta Canada. I’ve posted a link to that site below.
“ Hearing loss does not continue to deteriorate after noise exposure is removed. Hearing loss that occurs after the noise exposure is removed is related to other factors”
https://www.wcb.ab.ca/assets/pdfs/providers/HCP_Hearing_loss.pdf
https://www.earq.com/hearing-health/articles/guide-to-noise-induced-hearing-loss
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hearing-loss/symptoms-causes/syc-20373072
Hopefully fellow mentor, @julie04, will be able to provide you with more comprehensive information. She is very active in our Hearing Loss group and offers peer support with The Hearing Loss Association of America, (HLAA)

Are you suffering from hearing loss?

REPLY
@julieo4

Noise induced hearing loss is not reversible. Continued damage can be prevented by using ear plugs and avoiding extreme noise. If your hearing has deteriorated due to noise exposure, you already know you are prone to hearing loss. It's up to you to protect it.

Jump to this post

Thanks Julie! I just saw this posting for @aba and replied with the little information I found. Thank you for coming to the rescue! ☺️ We were typing at the same time.

REPLY
@loribmt

Hi @aba You brought up some interesting questions about hearing loss. From what I’m reading, hearing loss does not progress once the noise level has been reduced.

I found some informational articles that might shed some light on the differences between acoustical damage and other factors which can result in hearing impairment.

The following is an excerpt from an article provided by the Workman’s Compensation Board of Alberta Canada. I’ve posted a link to that site below.
“ Hearing loss does not continue to deteriorate after noise exposure is removed. Hearing loss that occurs after the noise exposure is removed is related to other factors”
https://www.wcb.ab.ca/assets/pdfs/providers/HCP_Hearing_loss.pdf
https://www.earq.com/hearing-health/articles/guide-to-noise-induced-hearing-loss
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hearing-loss/symptoms-causes/syc-20373072
Hopefully fellow mentor, @julie04, will be able to provide you with more comprehensive information. She is very active in our Hearing Loss group and offers peer support with The Hearing Loss Association of America, (HLAA)

Are you suffering from hearing loss?

Jump to this post

"Listening to loud noise for a long time can overwork hair cells in the ear, which can cause these cells to die. The hearing loss progresses as long as the exposure continues. Harmful effects might continue even after noise exposure has stopped. Damage to the inner ear or auditory neural system is generally permanent." this is the truth. now we should find the articles which write about.

REPLY

also found on google- " Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) develops slowly after many years of exposure. Susceptibility varies quite widely, but 10 Years or more of exposure is generally required for significant hearing loss"
to occur.13 july 2020

REPLY

see also – Themann, C.L. and Masterson, E.A., Occupational noise exposure: A review of its effects, epidemiology, and impact with recommendations for reducing its burden (2019). IMPACT LAST MANY YEARS AND LOSS IS MORE AND MORE. ANY MORE SOURCES YOU KNOW?

REPLY

Katz, J., Handbook of clinical audiology (2015)….

REPLY

Noise-induced hearing loss – ‎Rabinowitz – Cited by 449
Noise-Induced Hearing Loss PETER M. RABINOWITZ, M.D., M.P.H., Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut Am Fam Physician. 2000 May 1;61(9):2749-2756.
"Once exposure to damaging noise levels is discontinued, further significant progression of hearing loss stops." – SIGNIFICANT NO – BUT NON SIGNIFICANT YES, FOR MANY YEARS LATER- ANY SOURCRSES MORE ? PLEASE LET ME KNOW

REPLY

Damage can occur with long-term exposure to loud noises. THAN IT progresses SLOWLY BUT GETTING MORE AND MORE LOSS HEARING. I AM LOOKING FOR THIS POINT IF ANY RESEARCH WAS DONE ABOUT.

REPLY

If you lose lets say 30% of your hearing from High decibel loud noise it cannot return however that is one good reason why people wear hearing aids because the more stress you place on the brain to hear (particularly damaged cochlear hair cells) the more chance of additional hearing loss. The audiologist will fit your aids to your hearing gain and if its 70% it will stay at 70% however the brain will not struggle to hear. I hope this was somewhat clear?

REPLY
@mattie1014

If you lose lets say 30% of your hearing from High decibel loud noise it cannot return however that is one good reason why people wear hearing aids because the more stress you place on the brain to hear (particularly damaged cochlear hair cells) the more chance of additional hearing loss. The audiologist will fit your aids to your hearing gain and if its 70% it will stay at 70% however the brain will not struggle to hear. I hope this was somewhat clear?

Jump to this post

" the more stress you place on the brain to hear (particularly damaged cochlear hair cells) the more chance of additional hearing loss."- fact or thinking about?

REPLY

It may be interesting for you to know that prior to 1988 very little research was being done on hearing loss. That was the year that the NIDCD (National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders) was established within the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Most of the other institutes within NIH had been established many decades prior.

I mention this because so much of the research in this area is relatively new. Prior to the establishment of NIDCD, most research was done on total deafness, Deaf culture, manual communication as a resolution, etc.

The huge majority of the population with hearing loss is hard of hearing; not deaf. Further, the majority of those with profound hearing loss are people who remain in the hearing world with technology…or are people who struggle with adult onset hearing loss and don't know where or how to get help. They are not manual communicators, although a few may learn to use sign language. It is extremely difficult for a person who becomes 'hearing impaired' after the onset of language to become a part of the Deaf community. It has taken a long time to separate these 2 very different populations and a lot of confusion remains about what can be done to help the hard of hearing population regardless of degree of loss.

Years ago I was privileged to participate in a program presented by the person who was then, head of NIDCD. The discussion was about noise induced hearing loss (NIHL), it's cause, it's potential for cure, and its incidence. The theory then was that about half of the population had a predisposition to noise induced hearing loss. The other half did not. If that holds, we know that some people are not affected by extreme noise, while others are. Obviously, there is likely a genetic predisposition as well. In all cases, those with NIHL were warned that it was not curable, and to protect what hearing they had by avoiding extreme noise.

At that time, the late 80s; early 90s, cochlear implants were still considered experimental. Those who had received them were test subjects. The implants, then, were single channel devices that brought back sound to recipients, but little speech clarity. Thanks to more research being done, the attitude that NIHL cannot be cured or helped has changed. Cure, no, but help, yes. Cochlear implants today have brought sound and speech back to the majority of CI recipients, most of whom have NIHL or sensorineural hearing loss. They now have 24 channels, and can be mapped to an individual's needs. They are not 'cures', but are definitely a technology that can keep a person with profound hearing loss in the hearing mainstream.

So, final statement: PROTECT YOUR HEARING. Avoid extreme noise. Insist on appropriate ear protection if your work environment is noisy. Invest in ear plugs if you attend loud concerts, and turn down the sound when you can.

REPLY
Please sign in or register to post a reply.
  Request Appointment