Recognizing my own bias or prejudice .....

Posted by ellerbracke @ellerbracke, Aug 31, 2019

I know I am very guilty of classifying people in general, and regarding weight in particular. Living in the bible/heart attack/ diabetes belt, it simply blows my mind how many obese people I see every single day when out and about. Granted, fewer of those at Dillard’s than Walmart. Still, in addition to being concerned, I am also judging those people. I know I should not, but how in the world can someone get that fat? It would take years of dedicated overeating to reach that. No, I really don’t think that all of them have a medical issue, seeing what’s in their grocery carts. Someone help me get a less judgmental attitude when I’ve been semi-denying myself all those chips and cookies and fries for decades?? I live and eat well, but treats should be treats, not daily food.

@gingerw

I find this discussion to be fascinating, as you follow the twists and turns from the original comments. I have at least two siblings who are vegetarians or vegans, yet have moderately controlled sweet-tooths. Myself, due to kidney issues, eat a low potassium/low phosphorus/low sodium diet, with almost no dairy. Plus low purine due to gout [no shellfish, mushrooms, pork]. Very little red meat, lots of chicken and fish; some day I will wake up clucking! Yes, as @ayeshasharma said, poor eating and depression are linked, ask me how I know!
Ginger

Jump to this post

@gingerw
”some day I will wake up clucking!”
lol lol lol hahaha hahaha
Jake

REPLY

General comment: I’m on the waiting list for the latest book by Malcolm Gladwell titled “talking to strangers”. This author has always been a fascinating source of well researched information, and I expect this latest book to perhaps shed some light on pre-conceptions and erroneous assumptions of people and their motives. Just in case there are any interested readers out there.

REPLY
@ellerbracke

General comment: I’m on the waiting list for the latest book by Malcolm Gladwell titled “talking to strangers”. This author has always been a fascinating source of well researched information, and I expect this latest book to perhaps shed some light on pre-conceptions and erroneous assumptions of people and their motives. Just in case there are any interested readers out there.

Jump to this post

@ellerbracke I put the book on my list of want to read!

REPLY
@contentandwell

@ellerbracke my BMI is about 26 I think and my PCP does not want me to lose more. They actually say that as you age it’s good to have a little extra weight, I guess because if you get sick you have more to draw from. I don’t know if that’s why he doesn’t think I should lose more or what it is. Most people do not feel that I should lose more though.

When I was young I did get my weight down a lot and people were asking others if I had been sick! I hadn’t been of course but the weight I was at was not sustainable for me. I did not get that low in a healthy way. I was not underweight according to charts.
JK

Jump to this post

@contentandwell
Hi,

I started a discussion in healthy living about my thoughts on BMI.

FL Mary

REPLY

I have loved this conversation!! Thank you everyone for bringing humility and genuine perspectives. Everyone here clearly cares about health and unity in positive intentions is what drives us forward. Thanks @ellerbracke for this recommendation. I haven't read this book, but have heard of the author (from Oprah).

REPLY
Please sign in or register to post a reply.
  Request Appointment