Peritoneal Cancer: Anyone else?

Posted by turbo48 @turbo48, Jan 24, 2020
@dorcarvajal

A few days ago, I finally had my chemo port removed, which was part of me for three years after I was diagnosed with peritoneal cancer. It’s been a long journey and my oncologist was reluctant to have it removed for fear of a relapse. But here I am, in remission, benefitting from the treatment of chemo, immunotherapy and surgery. Grateful to hear the birds sing in my garden and savoring my exodus from cancerland.

Jump to this post

Congratulations @dorcarvajal!!! You have earned your right to savor your exodus. I truly understand what a milestone this is, as I look forward to the day when I can join you. My 3-year mark will be this fall, I am in remission with NED after a similar treatment experience as yours, although for a different cancer, and my doctors are discussing removing my port. Here's to your continued good health 🙂

REPLY
@colleenyoung

Hi Dor, I add my welcome. I noticed that you wanted to post a link to an essay you wrote for StatNews with your post. You will be able to add URLs to your posts in a few days. There is a brief period where new members can't post links. We do this to deter spammers and keep the community safe. Clearly the link you wanted to post is not spam. Please allow me to post it for you.

– Male doctors said my ‘female’ cancer was incurable. Then a woman took command and gave me hope https://www.statnews.com/2018/10/04/peritoneal-cancer-women-men-doctors/

It is a beacon of hope to hear you say that you're "savoring my exodus from cancerland." Many cancer survivors, even when there is no evidence of disease (NED), still don't feel like they can truly exit cancerland. There's the regular checkups and scanxiety, and every medical symptom makes one wonder… What is your tip to others to embrace the exit?

Jump to this post

Thanks for posting that essay Coleen. Since I wrote it, I have heard from families all over the world desperate for information about treating this rare form of peritoneal cancer. I wish there was some site that they could turn to for an up to date guide about treatment. Like everyone else, I feel dread every time I have to go for a scan or a blood test for CA125. I simply think in terms of one step forward, fall down, get back up. So far it’s been an incredible relief when the results come in. Meantime, I savor the present.

REPLY
@polkagal

Congratulations @dorcarvajal!!! You have earned your right to savor your exodus. I truly understand what a milestone this is, as I look forward to the day when I can join you. My 3-year mark will be this fall, I am in remission with NED after a similar treatment experience as yours, although for a different cancer, and my doctors are discussing removing my port. Here's to your continued good health 🙂

Jump to this post

Thanks @polkagal. Thrilled for you.

REPLY

@dorcarvajal What an excellent article! Thank you for writing it, although I’m sorry about the circumstances that got you there. Becky

REPLY
@becsbuddy

@dorcarvajal What an excellent article! Thank you for writing it, although I’m sorry about the circumstances that got you there. Becky

Jump to this post

Thank you. Since I wrote it, I continue to be contacted by families all over the world seeking information about this rare disease. There is a strong need for up to date guides.

REPLY
@dorcarvajal

Thank you. Since I wrote it, I continue to be contacted by families all over the world seeking information about this rare disease. There is a strong need for up to date guides.

Jump to this post

Have you heard of the book: “Unwell Women: Misdiagnosis and Myth in a Mam-made World” ?

REPLY
Please sign in or register to post a reply.