Parent of 6-month old child with moderate hearing loss in both ears

Posted by nadiail @nadiail, Sat, Apr 4 11:25am

Hi all, is it possible to solve somehow hear loss without being with hearing aids?
thank you in advance

Has the child had an ABR to confirm hearing loss? There is no cure for a true hearing loss. Early access to auditory stimuli is critical. Do not hesitate to amplify the child with an experienced pediatric audiologist. Research shows that when children have early amplification worn during all waking hours, they are on a trajectory for success on a listening and spoken language path.

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This is called BERA in Israel i think it is ABR and it confirms it. Is there some operation my child can do?

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I assume that the loss is sensorineural and not a conductive loss. For a 6 month old child, there are not many options, if any, other than hearing aids. There are implantable hearing aids (www.esteemhearing.com) but it is a surgical procedure but I don't think they would do this for a child. It's also not covered by insurance so, if it was an option, expect to pay thousands of dollars. There are extended wear hearing aids, namely the Phonak Lyric, that are inserted by an audiologist. That option would prevent a kid from knocking it off their ear, but I don't think this is an option for a child either. It's best to contact a pediatric audiologist.
Tony in Michigan

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@nadiail – Welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect! Was your child diagnosed at birth with hearing loss or more recently? I'm sure you have been told that good hearing is important for speech development. Have you seen a Pediatric Audiologist and Pediatric ENT specialist? Babies born with hearing loss are also candidates for cochlear implants. Here is a link to Mayo Clinic discussing hearing loss and also a video of a baby being able to hear after receiving a cochlear implant. https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/cochlear-implants/about/pac-20385021

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At birth probably. She didn't passed the hearing test after birth already.

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Hi, @nadiail Welcome to Connect.
I know the heartbreak of finding out that your child has a hearing loss, but although it is part of who my daughter is, it has not impacted her at all in her education or in her career. I realized that my daughter was not hearing well when she was a toddler but back then (she's in her 30s now) I was told she was a little too young to diagnose correctly, that could only be done with babies and young children who have profound hearing losses. You say the loss is moderate. So, your child can hear you if you speak up, basically being "loud and clear"? I must have been doing that quite well because when she was finally diagnosed at age 4, she had speech and language testing with the expectation being that she would need some speech therapy but she turned out to be above age level!
I think the sooner you can get her/him fitted with hearing aids the better the outcome generally though. Obviously my daughter was hearing me but was probably missing a lot from other people. She was in nursery school when she was three and although I told her teacher that we suspected she had a hearing loss the teacher told me, well into the year, that my daughter did not pay attention!
As I mentioned above, she was finally diagnosed at age 4 and started wearing hearing aids then. It was interesting to see her hearing things she had never heard before, like the sound of the microwave oven. When she was young she accepted wearing hearing aids completely, to her I think they were basically the same as people wearing glasses. She even took one off in school to use for "show and tell"! My daughter was quite shy when she was a child though and she did become self-conscious in those tough pre-teen and teen years. She always did well though and has a very successful career now.
I hope you have an excellent audiologist who often does deal with pediatric patients. That will be your best resource. We did seek additional opinions but they were the same as the audiologist's opinion who first diagnosed her hearing loss. I think we just needed that for our own peace of mind, to know that we had done everything possible.
I will be interested in hearing what is suggested by the audiologist.
JK

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@contentandwell

Hi, @nadiail Welcome to Connect.
I know the heartbreak of finding out that your child has a hearing loss, but although it is part of who my daughter is, it has not impacted her at all in her education or in her career. I realized that my daughter was not hearing well when she was a toddler but back then (she's in her 30s now) I was told she was a little too young to diagnose correctly, that could only be done with babies and young children who have profound hearing losses. You say the loss is moderate. So, your child can hear you if you speak up, basically being "loud and clear"? I must have been doing that quite well because when she was finally diagnosed at age 4, she had speech and language testing with the expectation being that she would need some speech therapy but she turned out to be above age level!
I think the sooner you can get her/him fitted with hearing aids the better the outcome generally though. Obviously my daughter was hearing me but was probably missing a lot from other people. She was in nursery school when she was three and although I told her teacher that we suspected she had a hearing loss the teacher told me, well into the year, that my daughter did not pay attention!
As I mentioned above, she was finally diagnosed at age 4 and started wearing hearing aids then. It was interesting to see her hearing things she had never heard before, like the sound of the microwave oven. When she was young she accepted wearing hearing aids completely, to her I think they were basically the same as people wearing glasses. She even took one off in school to use for "show and tell"! My daughter was quite shy when she was a child though and she did become self-conscious in those tough pre-teen and teen years. She always did well though and has a very successful career now.
I hope you have an excellent audiologist who often does deal with pediatric patients. That will be your best resource. We did seek additional opinions but they were the same as the audiologist's opinion who first diagnosed her hearing loss. I think we just needed that for our own peace of mind, to know that we had done everything possible.
I will be interested in hearing what is suggested by the audiologist.
JK

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I am an misdiagnosed victim. Aphasia and mentally challenged until correctly diagnosed at 16 . And my doc was known for the first baby testing. For some reason the east coast misdiagnosed even though they had the pure tone testing around. Thanks to a teacher who went above and aboard in making sure I learn how to read. Audiologists have been amazed how successful I have been – she is the reason.
Reading/ interacting – hearing aids is a must. Language any way possible is a given. Reading aloud to her. Have the hearing loss being part of the conversations with her friends and their parents. As much as my parents were in a well regarded area; they had friends With kids that would not play with me . My grandparents ( my father so side / uncle/ cousins-) would not let me be part of their lives.
Mainstream is a must. Being in special schools held me back to some extent . The doc who misdiagnosed me ( found this out when I was 18 ) wanted me in regular schools . I was not angry at my parents for correct diagnosis finally- took me to good docs – and they heard of the one who did the correct one when I was 10 or so. No anger there. But I was Mad about the education part- 4 hours of carpools and busses for years vs walking to school- good reputation too.
Hearing aids will make her speech in par her age- language before 5 will help loads. .
Feel free to ask questions

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