Now what! Neuropathy in feet and ankles.. Numbness in hands and arms

Posted by hotfooted @hotfooted, Oct 4 1:12pm

I don't understand why all 4 limbs are getting neuropathy.. Is this still peripheral neuropathy?

Liked by HankB, sunnyflower

@hotfooted Hi, Sadly, neuropathy can spread. I would suggest getting a current EMG/NCV conduction test to see what is going on with you. So sad, and I am so sorry. Lori Renee

Liked by Barry Sheales, HankB

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that's why it is called peripheral neuropathy — it affects first the nerves that go the furthest from your spine,where the nerves are the longest === i.e. feet and legs, hands and arms

Liked by HankB, sunnyflower

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@hotfooted
Yes, it can progress and is considered a progressive disease for many. Did it first start in your feet and legs and now going to hands/arms? That is often how it goes as the nerves to the legs are the longest and to the arms the next longest. I am sorry to hear that this is happening to you. When did your neuropathy first start and what caused it if you know? Hank

Liked by sunnyflower, jfinnj

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I have Neuropathy in my ankles, feet & legs & my dr. wants me to try out the HF10 the Spinal Cord Stimulator. Has any one tried this or know anything about it. I am having doubts & I need more research on it. Any help would be appreciated.

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Hello @hotfooted, I think you posted awhile back about having diabetes. How's are you doing with the diabetes? I'm wondering if the diabetes may be contributing to your peripheral neuropathy. If you want to dig into all of the science behind neuropathy, Matthew B. Jensen a neurologist at the University of Wisconsin in Madison has a great series of education videos here: https://www.youtube.com/c/MatthewBJensen/videos

I think I remember you mentioned having burning feet/pain with your neuropathy and it's also in your hands. I think it normally starts in the toes and progresses up into the legs and at some point usually affects the hands. So, it sounds like you have a normal progression of peripheral neuropathy. You may be interested in following this discussion if you do have diabetes – Diabetic Neuropathy progressing?: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/diabetic-neuropathy-progressing/

Have you been diagnosed with peripheral neuropathy? What tests did you have?

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@tigreyes2004

I have Neuropathy in my ankles, feet & legs & my dr. wants me to try out the HF10 the Spinal Cord Stimulator. Has any one tried this or know anything about it. I am having doubts & I need more research on it. Any help would be appreciated.

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@tigreyes2004, There are a couple of discussion on the stimulators that you might want to read through to see if it helps.

– Has anyone one tried the HF10 Spinal Cord Stimulation Device?: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/hf-10-spinal-cord-stimulation-device-relieves-back-and-leg-pain/
– Comparison of Spinal Cord Stimulators from Boston Sci., Nevro: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/comparison-of-spinal-cord-stimulators-from-boston-sci-nevro/

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@tigreyes2004

I have Neuropathy in my ankles, feet & legs & my dr. wants me to try out the HF10 the Spinal Cord Stimulator. Has any one tried this or know anything about it. I am having doubts & I need more research on it. Any help would be appreciated.

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@tigreyes2004

I had a Burst DR spinal cord stimulator implant in June of 2017. Year 1 was wonderful! Year 2 it needed adjustments every 3 months. Year 3 it became less and less effective, down now to not doing anything for the pain. I'm considering a dorsal root ganglion stimulator implant, but I'm far from sure about it. @lorirenee had one a few months ago and the results have been disappointing. But, you may be one of the fortunate ones who are helped long term..

Best wishes.

Jim

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@tigreyes2004

I have Neuropathy in my ankles, feet & legs & my dr. wants me to try out the HF10 the Spinal Cord Stimulator. Has any one tried this or know anything about it. I am having doubts & I need more research on it. Any help would be appreciated.

Jump to this post

@tigreyes2004 I just got the DRG stimulator implanted in me about 3 months ago, and it is barely working at all. I would suggest to you that if you do the trial for the HF10, that you do the trial for the full 10 days, and that you should have mostly successful days during it. I had a 10 day trial, and pain lowered by about 50% only on days 7, 8, 9, and on the 10th day, it was removed in the morning. Also know that sometimes, there are successful trials, and still, it does not work. Leads can migrate, and the surgery itself is surgery! It is painful, and healing takes months. Many, many people do well with the HF10. Just know that there is risk, and no guarantee. My best to you. I have had electricity to the leads in my back several times, and it just does not help. My pain doc still thinks I should not give up. I go for another adjustment this Tuesday, but I am no longer hopeful. Also, there are stimulator blogs on the internet. Find these blogs, and read about real people, not the advertisements for the HF10. Advertisements try to sell you. Read real people, real situations. Lori Renee

Liked by HankB

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@lorirenee1

@tigreyes2004 I just got the DRG stimulator implanted in me about 3 months ago, and it is barely working at all. I would suggest to you that if you do the trial for the HF10, that you do the trial for the full 10 days, and that you should have mostly successful days during it. I had a 10 day trial, and pain lowered by about 50% only on days 7, 8, 9, and on the 10th day, it was removed in the morning. Also know that sometimes, there are successful trials, and still, it does not work. Leads can migrate, and the surgery itself is surgery! It is painful, and healing takes months. Many, many people do well with the HF10. Just know that there is risk, and no guarantee. My best to you. I have had electricity to the leads in my back several times, and it just does not help. My pain doc still thinks I should not give up. I go for another adjustment this Tuesday, but I am no longer hopeful. Also, there are stimulator blogs on the internet. Find these blogs, and read about real people, not the advertisements for the HF10. Advertisements try to sell you. Read real people, real situations. Lori Renee

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@lorirenee1 I'm sorry your stimulator implant hadn't helped you I'm seeing my neurosurgeon tomorrow as I've had a rough week so I'm hoping for a change of meds or something he can do for me

Liked by lorirenee1

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@lorirenee1

@tigreyes2004 I just got the DRG stimulator implanted in me about 3 months ago, and it is barely working at all. I would suggest to you that if you do the trial for the HF10, that you do the trial for the full 10 days, and that you should have mostly successful days during it. I had a 10 day trial, and pain lowered by about 50% only on days 7, 8, 9, and on the 10th day, it was removed in the morning. Also know that sometimes, there are successful trials, and still, it does not work. Leads can migrate, and the surgery itself is surgery! It is painful, and healing takes months. Many, many people do well with the HF10. Just know that there is risk, and no guarantee. My best to you. I have had electricity to the leads in my back several times, and it just does not help. My pain doc still thinks I should not give up. I go for another adjustment this Tuesday, but I am no longer hopeful. Also, there are stimulator blogs on the internet. Find these blogs, and read about real people, not the advertisements for the HF10. Advertisements try to sell you. Read real people, real situations. Lori Renee

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@lorirenee1 @jimhd
Renee @faithwalker007 mentioned yesterday that she has a DRG stimulator implant as well and I asked her how it was going for her. Hope she replies. Hank

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@jesfactsmon

@lorirenee1 @jimhd
Renee @faithwalker007 mentioned yesterday that she has a DRG stimulator implant as well and I asked her how it was going for her. Hope she replies. Hank

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@jesfactsmon Thanks, Hank, for letting me know about Renee and her DRG. I did find her post and replied already. YOU DA BEST!!!! Lori

Liked by HankB

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@lioness

@lorirenee1 I'm sorry your stimulator implant hadn't helped you I'm seeing my neurosurgeon tomorrow as I've had a rough week so I'm hoping for a change of meds or something he can do for me

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@lioness Thanks for your empathy, as it goes a long way!!!! Yes, the DRG is doing very little, if anything. Best of luck at the neurosurgeon. Pain is a terrible road to live on. My best to you, Lori

Liked by HankB

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@lorirenee1 @johnbishop You may find this NIH study on Kratom helpful.. It is from a credible and respected source.. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5402527/ The Abstract conclusions are as follows..
"Our data analysis has not determined if biochemical benefits of kratom may prove to outweigh its toxicity and risks. On the contrary, it seems that its potential side effects outweigh the benefits, and severe and real health hazards can, insidiously, lead to death. Kratom clinical, psychological, and medical manifestations can be disturbing. Kratom (M. speciosa) use, among multiple compounds of the leaf, appear to be increasing in the Western world. Promising methods to accurately identify kratom compounds are still ongoing."

"Keywords: Mitragyna, Mitragyna speciosa extract, kratom, benefits, risks, fatality, toxicity"

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@lois6524

that's why it is called peripheral neuropathy — it affects first the nerves that go the furthest from your spine,where the nerves are the longest === i.e. feet and legs, hands and arms

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Hello Lois, I have SFPN almost all of my body; numb/burn/sting/pins&needles. Peripheral neuropathy means going outside the spinal canal (cord) to the body. I always thought that it was only in lower legs and feet. Boy was I ignorant! Hope that helps. I hope you are doing better than tolerable today and in general. Warmest wishes, Sunnyflower 😊

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If your neuropathy affects your legs/feet and arms/hands, make sure you are getting a correct diagnosis. CIDP — chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy — is characterized by symmetrical nerve damage in both legs, both feet, both arms, both hands. CIDP is rare and often misdiagnosed. It is considered an autoimmune disease and is treated with immune system modulators, primarily IVIG (regular infusions of gammaglobulin). Left untreated, or misdiagnosed and treated only for pain, CIDP can lead to permanent paralysis and a lifetime in a wheelchair. As a CIDP patient, I urge you to bring up the possibility of CIDP with your neurologist if you have symptoms in both legs or both arms or all four at the same time.

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