New book on Hearing and Balance with contributions from members

It is with great pride that I tell you about a new book that will be released this month by Mayo Clinic Press.

Mayo Clinic on Hearing and Balance, 3rd Edition https://mcpress.mayoclinic.org/shop/healthy-aging-books/mayo-clinic-on-hearing-and-balance-3rd-edition/

Here's a description of the book from its back cover:
"An estimated 466 million people worldwide have severe hearing loss. By 2050, as the population ages, this number is expected to jump to 900 million — not including the many people living with mild hearing loss. Likewise, balance is an ongoing problem for many. Millions of people have an ongoing problem with balance or experience issues with dizziness every day.

Now in its third edition, Mayo Clinic on Hearing and Balance will help you understand what causes hearing loss and balance issues, how they can be prevented, and how you can manage and live well with them.

Within this informational guide, you’ll get the answers to many common questions about hearing and balance, including how hearing and balance are tested, ways you can protect your hearing, what you can do to improve your balance, how underlying causes of hearing loss are treated, ways to cope with hearing loss and balance issues, and how to select hearing aids and cochlear implants.

You’ll also find exercises to help you assess your balance and improve it. In addition, real-life perspectives from people successfully managing hearing loss and balance issues will inspire you to take steps toward achieving better hearing and balance.

No matter what hearing or balance issues you face, this book will give you the tools and strategies to live well."

I know this last statement to be very true because members of Mayo Clinic Connect contributed their experiences and strategies which are quoted in the book. Thank you
@joyces
@julieo4
@ken82
@hopeful33250
@sueinmn

Anyone wish to write a review of the book? 🙂
What challenge or question are you looking for answers to?

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Hearing Loss Support Group.

@colleenyoung

IS THERE AN ANSWER TO- When hearing impaired (especially at a young age), whether it is from loud music or being in a noisy environment (a soldier in NOISY AREA for years),
Does the hearing continue to deteriorate even after you stop being in a noisy environment? Or if noise stops also stops a continuous decrease?
Is there a difference, regarding the continued deterioration in hearing, between acoustic damage resulting from a sudden noise (explosion for example) and which has not disappeared,
And permanent acoustic sabotage after several years of exposure to noise and the hearing deterioration continues though slowly?
POST ANSWERS AND BETTER WITH ANY ACADEMIC PAPERS

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@aba

IS THERE AN ANSWER TO- When hearing impaired (especially at a young age), whether it is from loud music or being in a noisy environment (a soldier in NOISY AREA for years),
Does the hearing continue to deteriorate even after you stop being in a noisy environment? Or if noise stops also stops a continuous decrease?
Is there a difference, regarding the continued deterioration in hearing, between acoustic damage resulting from a sudden noise (explosion for example) and which has not disappeared,
And permanent acoustic sabotage after several years of exposure to noise and the hearing deterioration continues though slowly?
POST ANSWERS AND BETTER WITH ANY ACADEMIC PAPERS

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Hi @aba, you'll notice that I removed your personal email from your message. We recommend not sharing personal identifying information on the public forum. As people post answers, you will get email notifications.
I recommend that people post answers to you in the discussion you started dedicated to the topic of deteriorating hearing loss after exposure to noisy environments here:

– Does hearing continue to deteriorate after exposure to noise stops? https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/long-year-hearing-loss/

i see you've posted several studies and books on the topic and receive helpful information from other members as well.

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I just got my copy a couple days ago! I flipped through and saw that the whole book needs to be read cover to cover. Perfect for these cold snowy days. I’ll come back w my review soon. Grateful that these issues received such thorough coverage.

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@happy2bhear

I just got my copy a couple days ago! I flipped through and saw that the whole book needs to be read cover to cover. Perfect for these cold snowy days. I’ll come back w my review soon. Grateful that these issues received such thorough coverage.

Jump to this post

I look forward to your review of the book, @happy2bhear. I'm finding it really easy to spot read as well for the information that is pertinent to me.

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Trying to find an Audiologist with experience working with musicians.

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@newhorizons

Trying to find an Audiologist with experience working with musicians.

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Specific to the Chicago area, Len?

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Went to an ENT yesterday and had some hearing tests but it appears my hearing hasn’t decreaced although I still have problems with high frequency sounds. Do high frequency sounds ever improve?
The dr said my balance issues aren’t related to my hearing but to my seizure, seizure meds and comas from seizures.
Jake

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@jakedduck1

Hi Leonard,

High frequency sounds start to diminish as early as the mid 20s. As we age we slowly lose some of these high sounds even though our hearing is “perfect”. Other causes could be medical but all of us lose these sounds as we get older….it’s a natural process. My older children (50s) took a high frequency test at a science museum years ago and compared it to my grandchildren who were in their teens then.
My children could not hear above a certain threshold but my grandchildren could. I tried, and because my hearing loss is profound, I could hear nothing.

So don’t fret you are not alone and no, high frequency sounds don’t improve. The only way you would be able to hear more high sounds is probably by wearing hearing aids but you don’t need them. Not to worry Leonard, be thankful for continued good hearing and maybe find out if there are some balance exercises that you could safely do on a daily basis. Might be worth a visit to a balance and hearing clinic for a consult.

FL Mary

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@imallears
I’m doing balance training at a physical therapy office three times a week. I didn’t know there were hearing and balance clinics.
I just hope my hearing never gets to the point where I need any type of hearing devices.
Thank you Mary,
Jake

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