Need to order medical book on MAC TB treatment and side effects

Posted by cmcclure @cmcclure, Mar 12 12:30pm

Im asking a moderator and or provider for for guidance an a concise book that outlines flow thru injuries and side effects caused by the disease and the treatment.. [Example 69 percent of the people with dx of mac-tb will be dx with asthma with in two years following treatment another example which effected me is optic neruitis caused by ethambutol another is dilation of thoracic aorta. ]. My name is Dr McClure it doesn’t have to go into much detail just maybe a meta analysis research on the topics or maybe there is an entire book out their devoted to what i am looking for… Or if there are any extra older book that fit this request, maybe it was used by a provider for reference ? 

or maybe a book that outlines that anything that can happen TB can be mimicked by MAC -TB I mean i know they are two different type of Mycobacteria but they basically the treatment is the same and the adverse and flow thru injuries or comparable. I just need someone who sees this all the time to sugest and book. Example everyone of family friends and patient that get a dx of breast canvcer they all get a copy of Dr Loves "the breast book"} . Im looking to litigate flow thru injuries caused and side effects caused by the infection. Please dont belabor me with ideas that it is not contagious blah blah blah thats was never my point however occupational exposure does occur and if said person is not provided correct gear to do certain work such as cleaning out heating and cooling vents in a prison where birds and bats and other animals have left fecal material for years and years then that occupational no traditonally fouind in the homw or the dreaded cliche " it is ubiquitous in the environment" blah blah blah please just give me a good reference book thank you all for the help and nope my typing has not improved but my language has 🙂

REPLY

I don’t know of a book. I’m sure there are many articles out there however. What I do know is those meds are harsh, and side effects happen. It is important to do our due diligence and make informed decisions regarding our health. Most doctors who prescribe the meds encourage patient feedback on tolerance/side effects of the meds. Mine have had to be tweaked more than once.

Liked by tdrell

REPLY
@cmcclure

or maybe a book that outlines that anything that can happen TB can be mimicked by MAC -TB I mean i know they are two different type of Mycobacteria but they basically the treatment is the same and the adverse and flow thru injuries or comparable. I just need someone who sees this all the time to sugest and book. Example everyone of family friends and patient that get a dx of breast canvcer they all get a copy of Dr Loves "the breast book"} . Im looking to litigate flow thru injuries caused and side effects caused by the infection. Please dont belabor me with ideas that it is not contagious blah blah blah thats was never my point however occupational exposure does occur and if said person is not provided correct gear to do certain work such as cleaning out heating and cooling vents in a prison where birds and bats and other animals have left fecal material for years and years then that occupational no traditonally fouind in the homw or the dreaded cliche " it is ubiquitous in the environment" blah blah blah please just give me a good reference book thank you all for the help and nope my typing has not improved but my language has 🙂

Jump to this post

@cmcclure I don't know of such a book. Most of the information cited here is from studies and monographs published by nih or teaching and research universities or hospitals around the world. MAC is part of the family of non-tubercular mycobacteria (NTM) so perhaps you can find something through a search for it. Since the study and treatment of MAC is an ever-changing medical practice, I'm not sure any textbooks have been published. Have you sought help at a medical school library near you?
Also, this forum is primarily patient-centered, so your post may not be reaching the physicians and practitioners you seek.
@colleenyoung Can you suggest another search avenue for this information?
Sue

Liked by tdrell

REPLY

Hi @cmcclure, first, you'll notice that I removed your mailing address from your post. We recommend that members not post personal identifying information on a public forum.
My first recommendation is to review the literature authored by Timothy Aksamit, M.D. https://www.mayoclinic.org/biographies/aksamit-timothy-r-m-d/bio-20053043 He is a leading expert in MAC and Bronchiectasis, and Chair of the United States Bronchiectasis and Research Registry

Here is a list of his publications and research activities:
– Publications https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?cmd=PureSearch&term=(aksamit+tr%5BAuthor%5D+AND+mayo%5BAll+Fields%5D)
– Research Activities https://www.mayo.edu/research/faculty/aksamit-timothy-r-m-d/bio-00027560?_ga=2.79627988.1704566951.1583961150-2101428851.1583961150

There is also the June 2012 issue of Clinics in Chest Medicine, which you can purchase by chapter, including the chapter
Bronchiectasis and Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease by David E. Griffith, Timothy R. Aksamit
https://www.chestmed.theclinics.com/issue/S0272-5231(11)X0007-2

REPLY

Hello Colleen, Thanks for posting very helpful links. One of the articles from chestmed.theclinics.com states "Over the last 30 years it has become increasingly clear that nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) lung infections and bronchiectasis are closely related disorders. Although incontrovertible proof is lacking, there is a growing consensus of opinion that NTM lung disease characterized by nodules and bronchiectasis (nodular/bronchiectatic NTM lung disease) may be a consequence of preexisting bronchiectasis that predisposes to NTM infection and disease. Essentially all NTM patients have bronchiectasis, so optimal overall patient management requires successful therapeutic strategies for both NTM infection and bronchiectasis" This has answered a long time question of mine that tells me which of the 2 actually comes first, looks like bronchiectasis wins that argument. Bottom line for me is since bronchiectasis never really goes away one must continue to address that even after the NTM/MAC gets cleared by antibiotics. Bill

REPLY

Well said!

REPLY
@colleenyoung

Hi @cmcclure, first, you'll notice that I removed your mailing address from your post. We recommend that members not post personal identifying information on a public forum.
My first recommendation is to review the literature authored by Timothy Aksamit, M.D. https://www.mayoclinic.org/biographies/aksamit-timothy-r-m-d/bio-20053043 He is a leading expert in MAC and Bronchiectasis, and Chair of the United States Bronchiectasis and Research Registry

Here is a list of his publications and research activities:
– Publications https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?cmd=PureSearch&term=(aksamit+tr%5BAuthor%5D+AND+mayo%5BAll+Fields%5D)
– Research Activities https://www.mayo.edu/research/faculty/aksamit-timothy-r-m-d/bio-00027560?_ga=2.79627988.1704566951.1583961150-2101428851.1583961150

There is also the June 2012 issue of Clinics in Chest Medicine, which you can purchase by chapter, including the chapter
Bronchiectasis and Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease by David E. Griffith, Timothy R. Aksamit
https://www.chestmed.theclinics.com/issue/S0272-5231(11)X0007-2

Jump to this post

@colleenyoung Thank you! As you know, I'm always on a quest for more information, and this is a great list.
Sue

Liked by tdrell

REPLY

@poodledoc @sueinmn @irene5, You're welcome. It is so often the case that one member asks a question and the answer benefits many.
@cmcclure I'm curious. Are you an MD or PhD? What is your specialty? You mentioned in another discussion that you work with hospice patients in the prison setting. Is this as a medical professional or in a volunteer capacity?

REPLY
@colleenyoung

Hi @cmcclure, first, you'll notice that I removed your mailing address from your post. We recommend that members not post personal identifying information on a public forum.
My first recommendation is to review the literature authored by Timothy Aksamit, M.D. https://www.mayoclinic.org/biographies/aksamit-timothy-r-m-d/bio-20053043 He is a leading expert in MAC and Bronchiectasis, and Chair of the United States Bronchiectasis and Research Registry

Here is a list of his publications and research activities:
– Publications https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?cmd=PureSearch&term=(aksamit+tr%5BAuthor%5D+AND+mayo%5BAll+Fields%5D)
– Research Activities https://www.mayo.edu/research/faculty/aksamit-timothy-r-m-d/bio-00027560?_ga=2.79627988.1704566951.1583961150-2101428851.1583961150

There is also the June 2012 issue of Clinics in Chest Medicine, which you can purchase by chapter, including the chapter
Bronchiectasis and Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease by David E. Griffith, Timothy R. Aksamit
https://www.chestmed.theclinics.com/issue/S0272-5231(11)X0007-2

Jump to this post

Colleen – If you look at the persons posts from a year ago, it is evident not a doctor. Just putting my two cents in.

REPLY

@cmcclure I just was doing some internet research and ran across a book that might interest you, or others, although it is expensive. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease: A Comprehensive Approach to Diagnosis and Management, edited by David E. Griffith from Tyler, TX The book is available on Amazon and other internet sites. I believe the copyright is 2019. Hope it helps! Martha

REPLY
@marthachs

@cmcclure I just was doing some internet research and ran across a book that might interest you, or others, although it is expensive. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease: A Comprehensive Approach to Diagnosis and Management, edited by David E. Griffith from Tyler, TX The book is available on Amazon and other internet sites. I believe the copyright is 2019. Hope it helps! Martha

Jump to this post

Just want to remind everybody that Mayo Clinic has an online bookstore as Colleen has stated along with the link. They have books concerning other medical issues as well.

REPLY
Please login or register to post a reply.