Colorectal cancer stage 3c: Need positive feedback

Posted by dianemarcia @dianemarcia, Jan 3, 2019

OK so I need chemo..stage 3c. Scared to death. Need positive please. Had surgery to remove mass. Found 8 lymph nodes out of 27 that were positive. Any advise?? Please! Dr. Said had to wait for body to recover from surgery b 4 chemo

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@flahertygang

I was diagnosed with 3C last year. Had colon resection surgery February 26, 2019 and started chemo March 28, 2019. Had 12 rounds and I feel great. You can do this. Stay positive as much as possible. I focused on getting through each treatment one at a time and did a count down. It now seems like so long ago. Last month I had a CT scan and first colonoscopy since last year and everything looks good. It is an emotional rollercoaster for sure but just take things day by day. You are allowed to have bad days but focus on your mission – beating this evil monster. You got this! 💪🏼

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GANG, what you said is so True! NEVER EVER GIVE UP!
You can beat anything if you put your mind to it!
Richard(Sundance)

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@sundance6

Virgo, I just celebrated my 21 years from having Stage IV Colon cancer! After they took out what they coulld we statred chemo! I had a recation to it, 5FU. Within three weeks of starting the chemo I was in the ER with a couple hours to live! My wife was told to get my daughter there! The Priest was brought in for Last Rights! I was on Life Support with around the clock observation for 10 days. After 7 days they kept m in the coma, but still in ICU on Life Support! After a total of 13 days they gave my wife the option to take me off knowing there was no garuntees. First time I didn't start up, but the second try I did!
When I came out of the coma I made the decision I was going to change my Life and Live! That next year I was working out of my motorhome traveling from Mexico to Canada in the Rockies! During that time while working I didn't pass up many Trout Rivers. As a matter of fact I was on all or part of a day for 150 days that year!
The doctor still to this day can not understand how I lived and how I have never had a reocurance of the cancer!
IT'S EASY! IT'S ALL IN YOU MIND AND IN YOUR SOUL AND THE WANTING TO LIVE!
YOU'LL BE FINE! JUST BELIEVE IT!
AS B-Ball coach Jimmy V. said a year or so before I had my experience "NEVER EVER GIVE UP"!
I STILL LIVE MY THAT MOTTO!
My thoughts and prayers to you! You will be ok!
Richard (Sundance)

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@sundance6 OK Remember that little train, I think it was on a kids show, chugging down the tracks saying “I can do it, I can do it” Well, sundance6, you are that train! Or that ant climbing the hill. (me) If you can come back from all of that, I guess, I can kick those negative thoughts to the curb. Like you, I got a lot of living to do!!!!!! virgo❤️

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You sure do! Nobody ever said that was easy! Just like the World today! As frustrating as it may be to some, we can make it through!
Richard

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I am glad we have this Mayo Clinic forum. As I have posted in the past, it was the stories of others here that in 2015 led me to Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, and an exploratory that saved my life with small bowel surgery to remove 3’ of Carcinoid Cancer and 13 lymph nodes for Stage III. My 4 yr Gallium 68 Dotatate PET Scan scheduled at Dana Farber next week. My empathy to all who are suffering in one form or another. There is hope, do not lose faith.

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@musicflowers4u

I am glad we have this Mayo Clinic forum. As I have posted in the past, it was the stories of others here that in 2015 led me to Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, and an exploratory that saved my life with small bowel surgery to remove 3’ of Carcinoid Cancer and 13 lymph nodes for Stage III. My 4 yr Gallium 68 Dotatate PET Scan scheduled at Dana Farber next week. My empathy to all who are suffering in one form or another. There is hope, do not lose faith.

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All the best for your scan, @musicflowers4u. I'll be thinking of you.

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@musicflowers4u

I am glad we have this Mayo Clinic forum. As I have posted in the past, it was the stories of others here that in 2015 led me to Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, and an exploratory that saved my life with small bowel surgery to remove 3’ of Carcinoid Cancer and 13 lymph nodes for Stage III. My 4 yr Gallium 68 Dotatate PET Scan scheduled at Dana Farber next week. My empathy to all who are suffering in one form or another. There is hope, do not lose faith.

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🙏

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@musicflowers4u

I am glad we have this Mayo Clinic forum. As I have posted in the past, it was the stories of others here that in 2015 led me to Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, and an exploratory that saved my life with small bowel surgery to remove 3’ of Carcinoid Cancer and 13 lymph nodes for Stage III. My 4 yr Gallium 68 Dotatate PET Scan scheduled at Dana Farber next week. My empathy to all who are suffering in one form or another. There is hope, do not lose faith.

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Hello @musicflowers4u

So nice to hear from you again! I do hope that your scan next week goes well for you. How are you feeling these days?

Will you post again after you get the results of your scan?

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Hello everyone,

I'm on a lung blog here at MAYO and I was diagnosed with Stage 3b colon cancer about 2.5 years ago. It came as a huge shock, since I had retired one year earlier and I had no symptoms . . . in fact, I had not felt so well in a dozen years. The strange thing is first they thought the cancer was under my right rib, and 10 days later they thought it was over my left hip. So surgery involved both sides of my abdomen, and lots of uncertainty. I was in such great physical condition that I went home from the hospital after 3 days – my surgeon said I could leave after 48 hours. I started chemo 3 weeks later, 2.5 days of chemo, 11 days off, for 6 months. It drained me of every bit of energy I had – the feeling was inexplicable and at times I slept for 14 hours at a crack.

Today, I am 26 months post-chemo, which has left me with some real nerve damage that I've learned to live with – it's quite difficult to type this accurately because of the sensations in my fingers. I have a colonoscopy every year. At my last one in December, the doc found a different fast growing precancerous polyp that he called me about when the path report came in. So I am still plugging along with a colonoscopy each year until I have a 'clean' one with no polyp – this is that the doc and I have agreed to, as extreme as it may sound.

If I can offer comfort or suggestions to anyone based on my experience, I would be happy to help. God bless you all in our journey with cancer.

Paula

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It is smart to have the colonoscopy every year. My gastro doc insisted on 5 years till my last one needed removal of 42 polyps two of which were flat and precancerous, now next colonoscopy not more than 3 year interval pet path lab and I will start pushing my doc at year 2.

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“per” path lab

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@Paula_MAC2007

Hello everyone,

I'm on a lung blog here at MAYO and I was diagnosed with Stage 3b colon cancer about 2.5 years ago. It came as a huge shock, since I had retired one year earlier and I had no symptoms . . . in fact, I had not felt so well in a dozen years. The strange thing is first they thought the cancer was under my right rib, and 10 days later they thought it was over my left hip. So surgery involved both sides of my abdomen, and lots of uncertainty. I was in such great physical condition that I went home from the hospital after 3 days – my surgeon said I could leave after 48 hours. I started chemo 3 weeks later, 2.5 days of chemo, 11 days off, for 6 months. It drained me of every bit of energy I had – the feeling was inexplicable and at times I slept for 14 hours at a crack.

Today, I am 26 months post-chemo, which has left me with some real nerve damage that I've learned to live with – it's quite difficult to type this accurately because of the sensations in my fingers. I have a colonoscopy every year. At my last one in December, the doc found a different fast growing precancerous polyp that he called me about when the path report came in. So I am still plugging along with a colonoscopy each year until I have a 'clean' one with no polyp – this is that the doc and I have agreed to, as extreme as it may sound.

If I can offer comfort or suggestions to anyone based on my experience, I would be happy to help. God bless you all in our journey with cancer.

Paula

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@Paula_MAC2007 Hello Paula,

I appreciate you joining us in this discussion and sharing your journey with colon cancer. You have offered a lot of insight and encouragement. I look forward to you sharing more with us.

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Oh my, in reading my post is sounds so negative … it was meant to be informative and I missed the boat in not including positive info. I am feeling so very well and back at my exercise classes – yoga and pilates – almost daily now, which were so helpful to regaining my strength. I've learned to adapt my life to what I can and can't do as easily now. It's life 'AC' — After Cancer — as I call it.

I had been an advocate for my health, having an unusual lung disease. But my experience with cancer and the circumstances of 'finding' it – rather unusual – made me more active in my healthcare. So far, my cancer has not spread outside of my lymph nodes. Yeah!! My fabulous oncologist and his team monitor & review the tests with me, and I'm on meds for the sensory neuropathy which do help somewhat. All in all, life is good!

Musicflowers4u — The standard protocol for my situation is colonoscopies every 2-3 years; since my cancer, each time the doc has removed 1 or 2 small polyps. I've insisted on a colonoscopy every year, until no polyp is there, so that's what I'm having done. This requires buy-in from the doc, because the doc needs to believe it is needed. And it means a hassle with the insurance company which I understand their concern (there are real life-altering things that can go wrong with the procedure, thankfully somewhat rate).

My surgeon said he sees people like me every day — people who have no symptoms. That's getting to be so common. So you really do need to advocate for yourself. I'd love to see a blood test developed that can detect something unusual, that indicates an intestinal cancer. And get it taken care of very early.

Peace to all.
Paula

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