Need Patient's Experience with Mayo Clinic. Is it worth it?

Posted by David @nycdave7, Sat, Jan 19 11:30pm

Hello, I was wondering if there is a substantial difference in quality between a top 1 hospital compared to a top 10 or 20 hospital in the nation. So I am a 25 year old, 135 lbs, 5’10” male who eat well, sleep well, and exercise. 2 Years ago, I had laser eye surgery where I was a very healthy individual have not gotten sick or the cold for 14 years. Part of the recovery regimen was using corticosteroids for 6 weeks and I developed systemic effects. Immediately, I had the swollen face & angioedema. One month later, I had a blood pressure of 160/100 with a heart beat of 100 at rest. Stopped since then (a bit over 2 years) and I still have the symptoms ( chest pain, headaches, light headedness , and concentration problems). I went through various doctors (about 25), including endocrinologists and neurosurgeons at Weill Cornell, Mt. Sinai, and NYU Langone in addition to private practices. I have some lab tests that showed slight to moderate elevated cortisol levels via. the 24 hour urine cortisol test and midnight salivary test. The doctors here seem to not care and are not really helping. i was wondering if it is worth the time and money to go out of network to the Mayo Clinic at Rochester, Minnesota or keep on trying in NYC. Losing hope and starting to get depressed.I have also had 1 slightly elevated reading of ACTH and morning Serum cortisol

GO TO THE MAYO CLINIC THAT WHAT WOULD DO

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We live in Iowa and traveled to Rochester for my husband's transplant due to the care and expertise, even though we were only 25 miles from another hos[ital that did transplants. We are lucky in that it was a "center of excellence" so our insurance covered it. We can't imagine going anywhere else for his care. It was so wonderful and we are glad we made the choice.
Blessings,
JoDee

Dave, I bounced around for almost a year seeing different specialists. Mayo diagnosed me in 48 hours. I have nothing but positive sentiments towards Mayo. A plethora of specialists converged upon me. My husband had to do battle with the insurance company, but they did end up paying after we hit our after pocket maximum. I spent over three weeks in the Mayo Hospital, and the care and facility was outstanding. This is not an understatement to say they saved my life. You are young; I would encourage you to pull out all the stops for your health. I am two years in remission and grateful for every day. I wish you the best.

I have been a resident of Minnesota for much of my life and, like most Minnesotans, I have always felt that Mayo Clinic is the gold standard for medicine and that if I ever needed care for a critical problem that is where I would go without question. Well, now that I am older I have developed some conditions that have not been resolved successfully by my regular doctors. So I requested an appointment at Mayo. Much to my surprise, they turned me down. My doctor sent a referral, same result. Their reason was that I was getting adequate care in my home area. If that was the case, why would I need an appointment at Mayo? Anyway, in doing some research, I find that Mayo now prioritizes care according to a person’s insurance. If you are privately insured, you have priority over those on Medicare (even with supplemental insurance) or Medicaid. This was NEVER mentioned in Mayo’s correspondence to me or by the woman I spoke with initially on the phone to request the appointment. I provided my insurance information—including my Medicare number. This system is in place to increase Mayo’s profitability. I understand that Mayo Clinic is not a charity. But I deeply resent the implication by the Mayo web site that “requesting” an appointment is pretty much like making one—much the same as at any docto’s office.
Anyway, my long time feeling of health care security in Minnesota—that I could always count on Mayo to have my back—is gone.

Yes, it's definitely worth it. I thought I had the best, but Mayo saved my life! Always ask your doctors how many times they have done a procedure, etc. Go where they do the procedure all the time!

Thanks to all of these responses that are so encouraging and helpful. Obviously, we have a LOT of Mayo fans here – and I'm a big one. I especially want to welcome some of you who are new to posting in Connect: @jrswiontek, @myszka, @chemobile, @dahlia391hlen, @kaysey, and @peaches1234… thanks so much for your great descriptions of what your treatment at Mayo has meant to you. This is so helpful to many others. I hope you stay on here and help others with your rare insight.

@jackiem95

I have been a resident of Minnesota for much of my life and, like most Minnesotans, I have always felt that Mayo Clinic is the gold standard for medicine and that if I ever needed care for a critical problem that is where I would go without question. Well, now that I am older I have developed some conditions that have not been resolved successfully by my regular doctors. So I requested an appointment at Mayo. Much to my surprise, they turned me down. My doctor sent a referral, same result. Their reason was that I was getting adequate care in my home area. If that was the case, why would I need an appointment at Mayo? Anyway, in doing some research, I find that Mayo now prioritizes care according to a person’s insurance. If you are privately insured, you have priority over those on Medicare (even with supplemental insurance) or Medicaid. This was NEVER mentioned in Mayo’s correspondence to me or by the woman I spoke with initially on the phone to request the appointment. I provided my insurance information—including my Medicare number. This system is in place to increase Mayo’s profitability. I understand that Mayo Clinic is not a charity. But I deeply resent the implication by the Mayo web site that “requesting” an appointment is pretty much like making one—much the same as at any docto’s office.
Anyway, my long time feeling of health care security in Minnesota—that I could always count on Mayo to have my back—is gone.

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I empathize, because I had this happen just today when I tried to get an appointment for my stepdaughter. Turned down….a/c they feel she is getting adequate care in her home area. The truth of the matter is that the functional medicine practitioner who was treating her has been censured three times by the FDA for performing unproven experimental treatments on human subjects. The California Medical Board served him with an Accusation Letter as the first step in revoking his license. He closed his practice before they could take that action. And this is the "adequate care" Mayo says my daughter is getting! Now we have to start all over again looking for a reputable doctor for her.

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@debbraw

Hi @nycdave7 – I'm sorry for your experience which must be totally frustrating and scary. And I totally understand your insurance concerns. I can't add much to what has been said by @IndianaScott, @dawn_giacabazi and others. The one thing I would ask is whether you have seen PBS' Ken Burn's documentary on Mayo Clinic? If not, I would encourage you to view that before you make a decision. For me, and many others, the basic core values of Mayo are so different than those of other health care organizations that it would sway my decision if I weren't already a Mayo patient and totally pleased with every aspect of my health care. Here's a link:
https://www.pbs.org/show/the-mayo-clinic/

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This is the key to Mayo 100%. Their core values are doing everything they can to make you well. Not that you are a profit center. Their team approach is the key. They made all of the appts. and I just showed up. Compassionate treatment by all those involved. I am on Medicare so my treatment was 100% covered for my routine cancer. I don't know what any experimental treatments cover. I had mediocre treatment at some of the best hospitals and doctors in the Chicago area. I do not regret going to Mayo.

@kaysey

I empathize, because I had this happen just today when I tried to get an appointment for my stepdaughter. Turned down….a/c they feel she is getting adequate care in her home area. The truth of the matter is that the functional medicine practitioner who was treating her has been censured three times by the FDA for performing unproven experimental treatments on human subjects. The California Medical Board served him with an Accusation Letter as the first step in revoking his license. He closed his practice before they could take that action. And this is the "adequate care" Mayo says my daughter is getting! Now we have to start all over again looking for a reputable doctor for her.

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Sad story.

@jackiem95

I have been a resident of Minnesota for much of my life and, like most Minnesotans, I have always felt that Mayo Clinic is the gold standard for medicine and that if I ever needed care for a critical problem that is where I would go without question. Well, now that I am older I have developed some conditions that have not been resolved successfully by my regular doctors. So I requested an appointment at Mayo. Much to my surprise, they turned me down. My doctor sent a referral, same result. Their reason was that I was getting adequate care in my home area. If that was the case, why would I need an appointment at Mayo? Anyway, in doing some research, I find that Mayo now prioritizes care according to a person’s insurance. If you are privately insured, you have priority over those on Medicare (even with supplemental insurance) or Medicaid. This was NEVER mentioned in Mayo’s correspondence to me or by the woman I spoke with initially on the phone to request the appointment. I provided my insurance information—including my Medicare number. This system is in place to increase Mayo’s profitability. I understand that Mayo Clinic is not a charity. But I deeply resent the implication by the Mayo web site that “requesting” an appointment is pretty much like making one—much the same as at any docto’s office.
Anyway, my long time feeling of health care security in Minnesota—that I could always count on Mayo to have my back—is gone.

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I am on Medicare and received treatment for my rare cancer immediately after my local docs dropped the ball. Perhaps your condition is not rare?

@bluemeade7

This is the key to Mayo 100%. Their core values are doing everything they can to make you well. Not that you are a profit center. Their team approach is the key. They made all of the appts. and I just showed up. Compassionate treatment by all those involved. I am on Medicare so my treatment was 100% covered for my routine cancer. I don't know what any experimental treatments cover. I had mediocre treatment at some of the best hospitals and doctors in the Chicago area. I do not regret going to Mayo.

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It wasn't a matter of the lack of insurance or the kind of insurance my daughter has. She has good private insurance. So, frankly, I don't see how they can justify turning her away on the assumption that she already has adequate care locally.

@jackiem95

I have been a resident of Minnesota for much of my life and, like most Minnesotans, I have always felt that Mayo Clinic is the gold standard for medicine and that if I ever needed care for a critical problem that is where I would go without question. Well, now that I am older I have developed some conditions that have not been resolved successfully by my regular doctors. So I requested an appointment at Mayo. Much to my surprise, they turned me down. My doctor sent a referral, same result. Their reason was that I was getting adequate care in my home area. If that was the case, why would I need an appointment at Mayo? Anyway, in doing some research, I find that Mayo now prioritizes care according to a person’s insurance. If you are privately insured, you have priority over those on Medicare (even with supplemental insurance) or Medicaid. This was NEVER mentioned in Mayo’s correspondence to me or by the woman I spoke with initially on the phone to request the appointment. I provided my insurance information—including my Medicare number. This system is in place to increase Mayo’s profitability. I understand that Mayo Clinic is not a charity. But I deeply resent the implication by the Mayo web site that “requesting” an appointment is pretty much like making one—much the same as at any docto’s office.
Anyway, my long time feeling of health care security in Minnesota—that I could always count on Mayo to have my back—is gone.

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Is this true? That means they won't take me again? Former patient from 2016.

I honestly don’t know if this applies to former patients. Suggest you call Mayo and ask.

@bluemeade7

This is the key to Mayo 100%. Their core values are doing everything they can to make you well. Not that you are a profit center. Their team approach is the key. They made all of the appts. and I just showed up. Compassionate treatment by all those involved. I am on Medicare so my treatment was 100% covered for my routine cancer. I don't know what any experimental treatments cover. I had mediocre treatment at some of the best hospitals and doctors in the Chicago area. I do not regret going to Mayo.

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I am not disputing the quality of care or their commitment to patients. But they are not a nonprofit organization. The interviews with their CEO on this matter stated specifically that the decision to prioritize privately insured patients Was related to increasing profitability. I would guess that if a certain department or specialty has availability in their schedule and no privately insured patients apply, they may take a Medicare or Medicaid applicant.

@healthytoday

Is this true? That means they won't take me again? Former patient from 2016.

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I doubt that this applies to someone who is already in the Mayo system.

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