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ajaymehta10
@ajaymehta10

Posts: 1
Joined: Nov 16, 2018

My Knee Replacement Surgery Experience

Posted by @ajaymehta10, Fri, Nov 16 6:38am

Hey friends, I am posting first time on this forum. Actually, I am recovering from a knee replacement surgery and get very good results. Now, I am able to do exercise as well.
My knee cap has some problems and I am a continuous feeling pain in the knee from a long time. My family doctor advised me to get knee replacement surgery and I plan my surgery under the supervision of an experienced doctor. While consultation, the doctor gives me a trust that your knee is able to work again.
On the surgery day, the surgeon gives me analysis and replace my knee joint with an artificial joint. After some medicines and ortho exercises I am able to stand or walking and with the time now I am completely recovering from this surgery. To get safe treatment and desired results you must need to follow the instructions provided by the surgeon.

REPLY

Hi @ajaymehta10, welcome to Connect. If you don't mind sharing, how long ago did you have the knee replacement? Many of our members struggle with the PT after the surgery, whether it be from pain or scar tissue formation that affects the range of motion after surgery, how are you coming along with range of motion exercises?

Hi @ajaymehta10 – So glad your recovery is going well. Welcome to Connect. You have great experience to share with others who have had knee replacements. I agree with you that following your doctors orders is paramount. What do you think is the most important factor that contributed to your success? For me, I think it was physical therapy in advance – going into it strong. But I'm wondering what others think.

I was in pretty good shape before surgery, but was given some specific leg strengthening exercises to do in the 3 weeks prior to surgery. Afterwards I faithfully did all the exercises given to me by the PT people. Hard, sometimes painful, time consuming, and boring – BUT they work. Best decision I made was to get a temporary membership in the wellness center of a retirement community. They have a salt water indoor pool, geared toward seniors with wide, shallow steps and handrails all around the inside of the pool. Water makes it so much easier and less painful to do the bending and stretching of the knee.
I am now almost 10 weeks post surgery, and I still have residual pain in the knee, especially at night. Not terrible, but not fun either. Also, in spite of the fact that I can easily do really deep squats – butt almost hitting the floor – when it comes to everyday activites like trying to pull a tight sock off the repaired-knee leg while standing, the knee still does not bend as I would expect it to. And lastly – does one ever get used to the really weird feeling when trying to kneel on the new knee joint?

@ellerbracke

I was in pretty good shape before surgery, but was given some specific leg strengthening exercises to do in the 3 weeks prior to surgery. Afterwards I faithfully did all the exercises given to me by the PT people. Hard, sometimes painful, time consuming, and boring – BUT they work. Best decision I made was to get a temporary membership in the wellness center of a retirement community. They have a salt water indoor pool, geared toward seniors with wide, shallow steps and handrails all around the inside of the pool. Water makes it so much easier and less painful to do the bending and stretching of the knee.
I am now almost 10 weeks post surgery, and I still have residual pain in the knee, especially at night. Not terrible, but not fun either. Also, in spite of the fact that I can easily do really deep squats – butt almost hitting the floor – when it comes to everyday activites like trying to pull a tight sock off the repaired-knee leg while standing, the knee still does not bend as I would expect it to. And lastly – does one ever get used to the really weird feeling when trying to kneel on the new knee joint?

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Hi @ellerbracke – Sounds as if you are doing great! Somewhere along the line I heard that 12 weeks was the magic number for most people being at about 90% recovery and that it really takes a full year to get 100% of what you will ever get. Also, my orthopedic surgeon told me that kneeling was something that was problematic for most of his patients. He said he heard it a lot from people who liked to garden: they pretty much had to give up on kneeling because it was so uncomfortable after a knee replacement. Kudos on your deep squats. Not me – LOL!! Are you taking anything for sleep at this point?

@debbraw

Hi @ellerbracke – Sounds as if you are doing great! Somewhere along the line I heard that 12 weeks was the magic number for most people being at about 90% recovery and that it really takes a full year to get 100% of what you will ever get. Also, my orthopedic surgeon told me that kneeling was something that was problematic for most of his patients. He said he heard it a lot from people who liked to garden: they pretty much had to give up on kneeling because it was so uncomfortable after a knee replacement. Kudos on your deep squats. Not me – LOL!! Are you taking anything for sleep at this point?

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No…. I’m usually quite content with 6 hours/night, which I’m frequently getting. If the knee is already pretty ornery before I go to bed I might cave and take an Aleve. Re. kneeling: one of my PT’s told me she had worked with roofers and firemen in the past, and it is possible to eventually do the kneeling in semi-comfort, but it will take a lot of practice. Might go for that later, currently I’m still concentrating on total extension (almost there), and flexion (around 125).

@ellerbracke – You are a champ! I never got beyond 125 on flexion. Did get to total extension, which was an accomplishment I took pride in given the hours and hours of PT it took to get there. LOL.

My recent X-ray shows no cushion and just bone on bone on the inside of my right knee. I am 65 and very active. Yesterday in fact I placed second in a 5k race finishing in 30 minutes. Be that as it may the knee problem all started 48 years ago with a high school football injury having cartledge removed from the inside of my right knee. The chickens have now come home to roost. I am scheduled to go to Chicago next week and meet with a surgeon who performs minimum invasive knee replacement surgery sparing the quad muscle.
Recovery time is cut in half. I am optimistic that my consultation next goes wee and that I move forward with the surgery.

@santi

My recent X-ray shows no cushion and just bone on bone on the inside of my right knee. I am 65 and very active. Yesterday in fact I placed second in a 5k race finishing in 30 minutes. Be that as it may the knee problem all started 48 years ago with a high school football injury having cartledge removed from the inside of my right knee. The chickens have now come home to roost. I am scheduled to go to Chicago next week and meet with a surgeon who performs minimum invasive knee replacement surgery sparing the quad muscle.
Recovery time is cut in half. I am optimistic that my consultation next goes wee and that I move forward with the surgery.

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Hi @santi – I'm very interested in the minimally invasive technique you describe that cuts recovery time in half. I'd like to read about it if you have a link to share. I am in the process of scheduling my second TKR at Mayo Jacksonville. And Congratulations on your 5K! Personally, I can't imagine doing a 5K in 30 minutes with my sad knee. In fact we have a 5K Pink Up the Pace to benefit breast cancer research and I was proud to walk it in an hour last month!! Is your knee in a lot of pain? I'm just curious what led you to decide this is the time to do it.

@debbraw

Hi @santi – I'm very interested in the minimally invasive technique you describe that cuts recovery time in half. I'd like to read about it if you have a link to share. I am in the process of scheduling my second TKR at Mayo Jacksonville. And Congratulations on your 5K! Personally, I can't imagine doing a 5K in 30 minutes with my sad knee. In fact we have a 5K Pink Up the Pace to benefit breast cancer research and I was proud to walk it in an hour last month!! Is your knee in a lot of pain? I'm just curious what led you to decide this is the time to do it.

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Hi Debbra,
Thank you for your reply. The pain in my knee is very manageable at this point. The pain is felt when I am sitting at my desk for a prolonged time or when I am asleep at night. Sometimes I have to get up and apply Ice when this happens.
I want to be out ahead of this and am being very conservative yet by the same token by proactive as well. Google Dr. Richard Berger in Chicago which will lead you to his website.

@santi

Hi Debbra,
Thank you for your reply. The pain in my knee is very manageable at this point. The pain is felt when I am sitting at my desk for a prolonged time or when I am asleep at night. Sometimes I have to get up and apply Ice when this happens.
I want to be out ahead of this and am being very conservative yet by the same token by proactive as well. Google Dr. Richard Berger in Chicago which will lead you to his website.

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Wow! @santi – I'm really impressed with Dr. Berger's website. Not only is the procedure described in detail, but the website answers all of the questions I would have on PT after surgery, medication, etc. Good luck with your appointment. Will you keep us posted?

@debbraw

Wow! @santi – I'm really impressed with Dr. Berger's website. Not only is the procedure described in detail, but the website answers all of the questions I would have on PT after surgery, medication, etc. Good luck with your appointment. Will you keep us posted?

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Yes- I will have an update for you in January.

Congratulations to all of you who have had good results from your knee replacement surgery. You are an inspiration to others. I think surgeons should have patients read or view videos from people who have had the surgery who followed recommendations and those who didn't. My husband's story will explain why I feel this way. Perhaps some pre-surgery psychological therapy should be done also.

My husband had knee replacement surgery on his right knee in June, 2015. He had no cartilage left in the joint and had put off the surgery for many years. I don't recommend doing this. At the time he was 68 years old, severely overweight and not at all active. During the surgery the surgeon decided to straighten his bowed leg. He now has one straight leg and one bowed leg. I don't recommend doing this either unless you plan to do the other leg in the future. The surgery went well and PT had him up and walking later that day. He left the hospital after 2 days and PT came to the house for several weeks. He didn't do the prescribed exercises as he should have, if the exercise caused more pain he stopped doing it. He progressed from a walker to a cane but refused to use the cane properly.

Now three years later he still has pain in the knee, he has about 75% extension and complains of numbness along the outer side of the knee. He was not able to progress to walking without the cane. He is unable to walk for any distance because of pain. This limits what he can do as an individual and what we can do as a couple.

Over the last few months the left knee has started causing more intense pain and he has to use his cane inside the house to walk a few steps. He refuses to consider another knee replacement because of the pain from the last surgery. He is even more sedentary than he was three years ago so I doubt that PT would be able to give him better mobility.

The moral of my story is if you have bowed legs and plan to have knee replacement surgery make sure this is discussed before surgery. Follow all orders for PT and do the exercises as prescribed. If you don't plan to take an active part in your recovery you can't expect good results and you are just wasting your time and that of the surgeon and PT staff.

@cindyt63

Congratulations to all of you who have had good results from your knee replacement surgery. You are an inspiration to others. I think surgeons should have patients read or view videos from people who have had the surgery who followed recommendations and those who didn't. My husband's story will explain why I feel this way. Perhaps some pre-surgery psychological therapy should be done also.

My husband had knee replacement surgery on his right knee in June, 2015. He had no cartilage left in the joint and had put off the surgery for many years. I don't recommend doing this. At the time he was 68 years old, severely overweight and not at all active. During the surgery the surgeon decided to straighten his bowed leg. He now has one straight leg and one bowed leg. I don't recommend doing this either unless you plan to do the other leg in the future. The surgery went well and PT had him up and walking later that day. He left the hospital after 2 days and PT came to the house for several weeks. He didn't do the prescribed exercises as he should have, if the exercise caused more pain he stopped doing it. He progressed from a walker to a cane but refused to use the cane properly.

Now three years later he still has pain in the knee, he has about 75% extension and complains of numbness along the outer side of the knee. He was not able to progress to walking without the cane. He is unable to walk for any distance because of pain. This limits what he can do as an individual and what we can do as a couple.

Over the last few months the left knee has started causing more intense pain and he has to use his cane inside the house to walk a few steps. He refuses to consider another knee replacement because of the pain from the last surgery. He is even more sedentary than he was three years ago so I doubt that PT would be able to give him better mobility.

The moral of my story is if you have bowed legs and plan to have knee replacement surgery make sure this is discussed before surgery. Follow all orders for PT and do the exercises as prescribed. If you don't plan to take an active part in your recovery you can't expect good results and you are just wasting your time and that of the surgeon and PT staff.

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@cindyt63 – Great comments! I agree with you wholeheartedly. Unfortunately, I don't think there is any way to get a spouse to do what they don't want to do themselves (she said with a sigh based on hard experience! LOL.) Sorry for your husband's distress. I hope things improve for both of you. Does his limited mobility affect your own options for activity? How do you handle that?

@debbraw

@cindyt63 – Great comments! I agree with you wholeheartedly. Unfortunately, I don't think there is any way to get a spouse to do what they don't want to do themselves (she said with a sigh based on hard experience! LOL.) Sorry for your husband's distress. I hope things improve for both of you. Does his limited mobility affect your own options for activity? How do you handle that?

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I don't let his mobility affect mine. Although I have degenerative disc disease, osteopenia, fibromyalgia and other ailments I refuse to give in. I do what I want within my limits. That means he stays at home and I go do whatever. Forty-three years ago, I didn't think our eight year age difference would be an issue. Now he's 71 and I'm 63 I have tried to take care of myself and stay as active as possible. I do all the yard work and I have a small garden in the spring and summer. I do all the shopping, cooking, cleaning, household repairs and laundry. I also have hobbies such as crocheting, knitting, quilting, genealogy, and embroidery that keep me as busy as I want to be. I have always believed that keeping our minds and bodies active improves our quality and quantity of life.

@cindyt63

I don't let his mobility affect mine. Although I have degenerative disc disease, osteopenia, fibromyalgia and other ailments I refuse to give in. I do what I want within my limits. That means he stays at home and I go do whatever. Forty-three years ago, I didn't think our eight year age difference would be an issue. Now he's 71 and I'm 63 I have tried to take care of myself and stay as active as possible. I do all the yard work and I have a small garden in the spring and summer. I do all the shopping, cooking, cleaning, household repairs and laundry. I also have hobbies such as crocheting, knitting, quilting, genealogy, and embroidery that keep me as busy as I want to be. I have always believed that keeping our minds and bodies active improves our quality and quantity of life.

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@cindyt63 – I hear you. My husband and I have a 9 year age difference. In our 40's it hardly mattered. Now he is 77 with Mild Cognitive Impairment… with a likelihood of progression to Alzheimers or some other kind of dementia. I'm 68 and active, busy in the community, LOVE quiliting (you're a quilting sister!), and at the same time trying to make sure my husband eats, stays busy, visits with friends, blah blah blah.. I applaud you for not letting his mobility affect yours. You go girl!

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