New diagnosis of Diabetes; want to improve by evening habits

Posted by Earleen @earlyrn, Nov 14, 2018

Good evening. I am a retired RN, and although it seems like I should understand this disease, and know how to take care of myself, I am a patient , who is dealing with a new medical problem, and not really sure what to do. I was recently diagnosed ( about 8 weeks ago.) A1C was 13.5 and the first blood sugar check was 480. I am better controlled today, but only because I am on Tresiba. I am having a hard time with food control at night, I have always been a person who snacked in the evening, I am on the high end of normal for my BMI, but I have a family history with Diabetes. I am active and have always taken walks with my dog daily. 2-3 miles. Also biking and swimming. So I think my activity is good, but I need help with my evening bad habits.

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@marvinjsturing

@contentandwell @retiredteacher I was a diabetic for several years and no one said anything about bananas or potassium. It was not until I was diagnosed with CKD that I had to watch my intake of potassium (and sodium and phosphorus) because my kidneys couldn't handle it.

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@marvinjsturing I knew nothing of potassium's role until my endocrinologist ran my blood profile. If it's in normal range, then there apparently is no problem, but mine was too much over, so that was one of the items he told me to avoid. I think mine does have to do with my kidneys and the carbs in bananas. I still eat one occasionally. They are good for my husband's heart disease, so what's good for him doesn't work for me.
I haven't had time to research yet with the holidays, but eventually I'm going to check it out, and see what's going on. Then when I go for my appointment, I'll ask my endo.
@retiredteacher, Carol
Volunteer Mentor

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@retiredteacher

@contentandwell JK. I had no ideal about potassium either. When I first went to my endocrinologist and he ran all the tests, especially the blood profile, my potassium level was out of range. Potassium is good for the body as an electrolyte and keeps muscle cramps at bay; however with diabetes, potassium outside the range is really BAD for kidneys. Since I've had some kidney problems, he told me to stop eating bananas. So I did and the next appointment, my potassium was in range. He told me a banana once in a while would be okay, but not as a regular fruit choice. Other foods are potassium sources, and I avoid them too. I don't want to weaken my kidneys any more than they already are. Ask your dr. about it. You may not have to be careful of that.
@retiredteacher, Carol
Volunteer Mentor

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@retiredteacher I just went and checked my test results — I have just about every test possible every month for my transplant team. My potassium is within range, going from 3.5 some months up to 3.9 sometimes. The range is 3.5 to 5.3 so bananas are definitely not a problem for me — only the carbs in them are a problem. I do try to fit them into my carb allowance because they really are good for you.

They keep an eye on my kidneys also because the immunosuppressants have made my creatinine go a bit high. I have to drink 80 – 100 ounces of water a day to keep them flushed. My creatinine number is still slightly higher than range but low enough that it is acceptable. Not much they can do about it, they have tried two different immunosuppressants and the one I am on apparently is less problematic.
JK

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As a diabetic myself, I can relate to some of the problems we have. I take Tradjenta once a day, Novolog before meals, and Basaglar at bedtime. If I don't have a reasonable (yeah, I know, what does reasonable mean) bedtime snack apparently my liver kicks in and makes too much glucose overnight. Have been on this regimen several months and A1Cs have been normal as well as finger sticks.

My biggest problem is dietary because I'm also in stage 3 renal disease and must watch potassium and phosphorus and have a history of kidney stones so have to limit or avoid foods containing high amounts of oxalates.

Going on a strictly vegetarian diet (no meat or dairy whatsoever) has helped with both issues. The only animal product I use is egg white so it's not quite a vegan diet. It's been a real challenge balancing carbs and vegetable protein with low-potassium, low-phosphorus foods but my in 8 months my GFR has gone from a stage four 28 to a stage three 37.

Of course, different diets and different meds work differently for different people, just thought I'd share what has been working for me lately.

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