Microphones for friends in noisy spaces

Posted by nightwatchrenband @nightwatchrenband, Jul 24, 2019

I have seen references to microphones for associates in noisy places which will send voice to your hearing aids. Can anyone give me some more informaiton, experiences, sources etc on these. Sounds like a great idea.

@maryjax I see! You use the Oticon TV link and I use the Phonak TV link. They probably work in the same principles. Occasionally I’ll just use the RemoteMic in a hotel by putting it next to the TVs speaker but yes it doesn’t work very well under those circumstances.

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@arrowshooter

I have and use both the Connect Clip and the Roger. I find the Connect Clip works better for a single speaker wearing the mic and the Roger has better microphones for detecting multiple speakers. But a noisy restaurant is still a problem with either one.

The Connect Clip is useful for connecting to my computer the hear the audio.

But the best technology for me is the Hearing Loop. That is an induction loop installed in our church which transmits any sound coming from our audio system directly to my hearing aids via the telecom (T-coil).

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Do you mean the Oticon ConnectClip? This a very helpful comparison.

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@maryjax

My remote mic didn’t work well until I leaned to turn down the hearing aid column to very low so I was hearing only the remote mic. That makes it work for me except for the very noisiest situations. I use an Oticon TV device, not the mic to hear tv better.

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@maryjax
That’s interesting…..I don’t think I tried that although I remember fooling with the programs to no avail.

FL Mary

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@judysmayo

@imallears Yes I have the same assisted listening device and I agree with you about the RemoteMic… it pics up EVERYTHING. I only used it in areas with no bkg noise. I’m surprised you are able to listen to the TV without the TVLink with your degree of loss. I really need it.
I’ve been researching the Roger Select and MyLink and have found out that Marvel hearing aids are coming out with a new HA that is RogerDirect-compatible and will stream the Roger signal directly to them. There’s also a newer Roger iN Select. I’m on overload with all this info and still researching. I’ll be keeping my audi on their toes! Since I’m looking to buy new aids I’m wanting them all to work together.

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@judysmayo
I’m surprised too although I rely on captions, I guess it’s a perfect setup and distance for me. I want tv to be a pleasure and not have to struggle for it. I sometimes use my directional mic program watching tv but it depends on what I’m watching. Sometimes the speech and captions combined are too fast. I’ve turned off series I wanted to watch because the captions just race along….these are prerecorded on Netflix and Amazon and thankfully, does not happened all that often.

FL Mary

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I like that there’s so many ideas and different options for people with hearing aids by so many different manufacturers. It does get somewhat confusing though. It’s great to be able to learn about the new technologies on the web.

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@maryjax

Do you mean the Oticon ConnectClip? This a very helpful comparison.

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Reply to "maryjax". Yes the Oticon Connect Clip.

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I've been shopping for a dual mic setup for a lecture group, and there's a HUGE selection of mics for all sorts of applications. A decent wireless system with two mics, for example, is around $500. Shoot–I paid $200 for a tiny lapel mic (only thing available) to pair with my aid. It works only if it's very close to the speaker, not at all for groups. Xmas Eve, I sat clueless while my daughter, son-in-law, and hubby talked, all of us within a few feet of each other. I caught occasional words, but not the actual conversation. Frustrating! Yet, there are great mics for all sorts of situations–except ones that work with aids. Why should we be expected to pay more and get far less than the hearing world? It's time for us to ask for better mics for more reasonable prices.

Liked by imallears, lizzy102

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Hi @joyces you may have noticed that I moved your post to this existing discussion on microphones for those with hearing loss so that your post would be seen by others discussing this topic. Simply click VIEW & REPLY in your email notification to get to your post.

@arrowshooter and @nightwatchrenband may have thoughts on this topic.

Back to you @joyces have you been able to find any other affordable microphone options?

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To Ethan, moderator: I've not found any other mics designed or sold to work with my aid, which is a Costco Bernefon (i.e., Oticon). I've given up watching TV, as we only can get it via Charter, and they do not provide captions. For a little while, there were captions on one channel, but that ceased a couple of weeks ago. It only showed old programs so isn't a huge loss. I do watch MS-NBC because it does have some explanation and ID of speakers–not actual captions, but some clues to help me guess about what's being said. My total frustration is groups around tables, both for "fun" and for technical discussions about fish and water due to a pilot project in our rural coastal county that will determine how water is allocated throughout Oregon in the future. Sometimes I can "get" part of discussions during small groups, but when the entire partnership meets (100 or more), it's four hours of understanding nothing, usually in a room that's not good for listening (hard surfaces, poor quality mics). This is a rural area, so I've yet to find a place that offers an induction loop. That makes a good mic even more important!

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@joyces

I've been shopping for a dual mic setup for a lecture group, and there's a HUGE selection of mics for all sorts of applications. A decent wireless system with two mics, for example, is around $500. Shoot–I paid $200 for a tiny lapel mic (only thing available) to pair with my aid. It works only if it's very close to the speaker, not at all for groups. Xmas Eve, I sat clueless while my daughter, son-in-law, and hubby talked, all of us within a few feet of each other. I caught occasional words, but not the actual conversation. Frustrating! Yet, there are great mics for all sorts of situations–except ones that work with aids. Why should we be expected to pay more and get far less than the hearing world? It's time for us to ask for better mics for more reasonable prices.

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The important point about remote microphones that work with hearing aids is compatibility. Traditionally, hearing aid manufacturers did not use an industry standard to communicate with the hearing aids directly. They used a proprietary communications protocol. This meant that you could only use products that came from the manufacturer (or a licensed third party) for your accessories. The problem is if you ever want to replace your hearing aid with a different manufacturer. All your accessories will most likely NOT work with another product. This is why using other "standard" hearing assistive technology (HAT) was more desirable. The products could be used with any hearing aid manufacturer. Since the aids would not receive a signal directly, there needed to be a way to get the signal to the aids. The telecoil was the way to do it. It required the hearing aid to have a telecoil and you used a neckloop to get the signal to the telecoil. Today, the new hearing aids have the ability to receive a standard Bluetooth signal without the use of another device. The Resound hearing aids use a modified Bluetooth (BT low energy) that was developed with Apple to get the iPhone signal directly into the Resound aids. To receive a standard Bluetooth signal, such as from an Android phone, you need an accessory (phone clip plus) to get the signal to the aids.
Confusing, but should get better if the hearing aid industry settles on a standard.
Tony in Michigan

Liked by arrowshooter

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@tonyinmi

The important point about remote microphones that work with hearing aids is compatibility. Traditionally, hearing aid manufacturers did not use an industry standard to communicate with the hearing aids directly. They used a proprietary communications protocol. This meant that you could only use products that came from the manufacturer (or a licensed third party) for your accessories. The problem is if you ever want to replace your hearing aid with a different manufacturer. All your accessories will most likely NOT work with another product. This is why using other "standard" hearing assistive technology (HAT) was more desirable. The products could be used with any hearing aid manufacturer. Since the aids would not receive a signal directly, there needed to be a way to get the signal to the aids. The telecoil was the way to do it. It required the hearing aid to have a telecoil and you used a neckloop to get the signal to the telecoil. Today, the new hearing aids have the ability to receive a standard Bluetooth signal without the use of another device. The Resound hearing aids use a modified Bluetooth (BT low energy) that was developed with Apple to get the iPhone signal directly into the Resound aids. To receive a standard Bluetooth signal, such as from an Android phone, you need an accessory (phone clip plus) to get the signal to the aids.
Confusing, but should get better if the hearing aid industry settles on a standard.
Tony in Michigan

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@tonyinmi
Hi,

Good explanation thanks. I don’t think the hearing aid industry will change much because they want you to stay with their brand .
People who buy a lot of proprietary accessories most likely will not change to a new brand of aid. What really ticked me off was that when I updated my Phonak hearing aids about 6 months ago, the remote for my older aids would not work with the newer aids….both Phonaks mind you. My Audi was annoyed also, got on the phone and was told that the older remote could not be paired with the newer aids. She ordered the new one anyway but did not charge me. She said they should be included with the price of the aids as it’s just a simple program and volume remote. She’s a gem.

Have a happy healthy good hearing New Year…FL Mary

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@imallears

@tonyinmi
Hi,

Good explanation thanks. I don’t think the hearing aid industry will change much because they want you to stay with their brand .
People who buy a lot of proprietary accessories most likely will not change to a new brand of aid. What really ticked me off was that when I updated my Phonak hearing aids about 6 months ago, the remote for my older aids would not work with the newer aids….both Phonaks mind you. My Audi was annoyed also, got on the phone and was told that the older remote could not be paired with the newer aids. She ordered the new one anyway but did not charge me. She said they should be included with the price of the aids as it’s just a simple program and volume remote. She’s a gem.

Have a happy healthy good hearing New Year…FL Mary

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fl Mary – where in Fla are you? If in Jax, please tell me the name of =
this gem!

>

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I loved my ComPilot! It wasn’t a mic though. When I for Resound 3D Linx HAs, I started using the mini Mic. Boy! It’s changed a lot of noisy situations into manageable ones for me. I use it in restaurants, in the car, with my mumble mouth doctors, with my grandson, on busses, bike riding with my wife (whom I can mostly understand even if she rides ahead of me) and so many other situations. My only gripe was it doesn’t work in restaurants talking to more than one person – too much background noise.

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@maryjax

fl Mary – where in Fla are you? If in Jax, please tell me the name of =
this gem!

>

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@maryjax
Hi,
I am in the Tampa Bay area. More specifically New Port Richey/Trinity. My amazing Audi is part of an ENT practice. I email her directly for appts or questions. She loves to hear what I know about meetings, loops etc.
Let me trial a bunch of ALDs and different brand aids last year..no money upfront .My ENT doctor is with that practice and I lucked out with her because she works at the location I go to which is 15 minutes away.The best Audi I have ever had in 40 plus years of wearing hearing aids.

FL Mary

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I found out that the Resound mics only let you pair one receiver (such as your hearing aid) with the mic. Phonak (and I think Oticon) allow you to connect multiple receivers. The reason I do that is so I can have a second receiver attached to my laptop when I'm at work, my tablet (Amazon Fire) when I'm at home, and my phone when I'm away from the house. That way I can view a captioning of the conversation, save it for later reference, and at work I add notes to the captioning. I couldn't do any of that if I had selected a Resound system.

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