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Elaine R.
@mrser52

Posts: 35
Joined: Dec 19, 2017

Tentorial Meningioma Brain Tumor

Posted by @mrser52, Dec 27, 2017

Dose any one know what is a anteromedial tentorial meningioma is?

REPLY

Tentorial meningiomas represent about 5% of intracranial meningiomas. Tentorial meningiomas are rare tumors located along the surface of the tentorium cerebella in the brain. These types of posterior fossa meningiomas can cause headaches, seizures, and difficulty walking. (Reference http://www.mountsinai.org/care/neurosurgery/services/meningiomas/types)
Anteromedial refers to the location, namely in front and toward the middle.

Mrser, has your diagnosis been established as a tentorial meningioma?

@colleenyoung

Tentorial meningiomas represent about 5% of intracranial meningiomas. Tentorial meningiomas are rare tumors located along the surface of the tentorium cerebella in the brain. These types of posterior fossa meningiomas can cause headaches, seizures, and difficulty walking. (Reference http://www.mountsinai.org/care/neurosurgery/services/meningiomas/types)
Anteromedial refers to the location, namely in front and toward the middle.

Mrser, has your diagnosis been established as a tentorial meningioma?

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Mine is 15 mm right anteromedial tentorial meningioma. So is this a bad one?

@colleenyoung

Tentorial meningiomas represent about 5% of intracranial meningiomas. Tentorial meningiomas are rare tumors located along the surface of the tentorium cerebella in the brain. These types of posterior fossa meningiomas can cause headaches, seizures, and difficulty walking. (Reference http://www.mountsinai.org/care/neurosurgery/services/meningiomas/types)
Anteromedial refers to the location, namely in front and toward the middle.

Mrser, has your diagnosis been established as a tentorial meningioma?

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Mrser52, just to be clear, I am not a medical professional. Only your doctor, who has all the details of your diagnostic tests and medical history, can tell you about your tumor, the treatment options, including benefits and risks.

I can, however, share some general information about tentorial meningiomas. Because of their location at the base of the skull tentorial meningiomas may be difficult to remove using standard types of surgery. Your doctor will review a number of factors when considering a treatment plan. Here are a few things your doctor might have talked to you about:
– where the tumor is attached
– the direction it is growing
– the tumor’s blood supply and how the blood vessels are involved
– your general health

You mentioned in another discussion that you are having stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). This type of treatment has revolutionized treatment of brain tumors. SRS is less invasive and safer alternative to standard brain surgery (neurosurgery), which requires incisions in the skin, skull, membranes surrounding the brain and brain tissue.

I’m so glad that you are getting care at a center that offers SRS treatment. I believe yesterday was your final treatment. What a great way to end 2017 and ring in the New Year! What are the next steps and follow-up plan?

@colleenyoung

Tentorial meningiomas represent about 5% of intracranial meningiomas. Tentorial meningiomas are rare tumors located along the surface of the tentorium cerebella in the brain. These types of posterior fossa meningiomas can cause headaches, seizures, and difficulty walking. (Reference http://www.mountsinai.org/care/neurosurgery/services/meningiomas/types)
Anteromedial refers to the location, namely in front and toward the middle.

Mrser, has your diagnosis been established as a tentorial meningioma?

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I will be seeing a Neuro-Oncologist. She will be taking over my care. And my doctor only talk to me about where is was attached to, that was it.

I have cancer in my meningioma

@none

I have cancer in my meningioma

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Hi @none, welcome to Connect. Did you just recently find out the your meningioma is cancerous? This must be difficult to hear. Did you already talk with your care team about the treatment options available to you?

Colleen it’s not me it is my friend.

@none

Colleen it’s not me it is my friend.

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What do you know about this and what kind of treatment is available .

Hi @none,
Treatment for meningiomas depend on many factors, including
– The size and location of the meningioma
– The rate of growth or aggressiveness of the tumor
– Age and overall health
– Goals for treatment
You can read more here: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/meningioma/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20355648

You might also be interested in watching this video about brain tumor treatment by Dr. Bernard Bendok, neurosurgeon, and Dr. Sujay Vora, radiation oncologist, at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. https://connect.mayoclinic.org/webinar/mayoclinicneurochat-on-brain-tumors/

Your friend is fortunate to have you learn more and offer support.

@mrser52 If you watch NFL football, the current helmet helps. There is a little trap door on the top front of the helmet. I looks like you could open it up to scratch, if you need to. That is approximately the area of the anteromedial tentorial meningioma, if you have one.

Hi .. please my mother has done a meningioma brain surgery and they had to do craniostomy and she’s recovering now but she still can’t walk without another person’s help
I need to know what should we do about the bone that she lost and what can I do to help her walk faster

@farah Hi, Farah. The only thing I can note here is that learning to walk again make be a very slow process. Now, it took her a year or so to learn to walk the first time, and she is much older now so she will not learn as fast. I suspect 2 or 3 years to learn to walk again should be about right. Like me, I have to go the other way. My legs and arms are losing their strength, probably to metabolic syndrome. And I am trying to slow it down as much as possible, so I would be happy to have 3 or 4 years left to enjoy walking.

@farah

Hi .. please my mother has done a meningioma brain surgery and they had to do craniostomy and she’s recovering now but she still can’t walk without another person’s help
I need to know what should we do about the bone that she lost and what can I do to help her walk faster

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@farah Hi, Farah, another note about the bone. I broke the bones in and around my pinky toe a couple months ago, and some of the bone disappeared. But sure enough, all the bone has now reappeared, and has welded into place in my toe and the bones of my foot. I also have had some other bones with breaks and etc., around my body. All those bones have reappeared. With me, anyway, the bones do grow back, if slowly, so I take calcium tabs to help the process. However, it is the tendon-type tissue around the joints and bones that is the problem. I tore the tendon sack around my thumb and broke my bones about 62 years ago, and the tendon sack has still not healed.

@farah

Hi .. please my mother has done a meningioma brain surgery and they had to do craniostomy and she’s recovering now but she still can’t walk without another person’s help
I need to know what should we do about the bone that she lost and what can I do to help her walk faster

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I don’t know but aren’t the bones around the brain different
I mean can it grow back even if it’s in this sensitive place ?

@farah Hi, again. Welll, I think that is a question for a doctor, but I do know a couple men who have had bones broken in the top of their skull by war, and the bones grew back in both of them. It took a good while, but with a good diet and tender care, they grew the bones back. Sadly, both brains were injured, but the men both survived into their 60s.

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