Menieres disease: Anyone had surgery or gentamicin injection?

Posted by rgbaker @rgbaker, Aug 11, 2021

I have menieres and laryngeal sensory neuropathy. My immunologist says they are related. I’ve just recovered from an episode of the latter and now my menieres has flared
Up. I’m on max dose of betahistine and the vertigo is currently debilitating. The tinnitus and hearing loss are getting worse too. Has anyone had surgery or gentamicin injection and if so was it successful?

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@rgbaker, I think you'll also be interested in this related discussion:
– Meniere's Disease https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/menieres-disease-2/

I modified the title of the discussion you started here to get experiences specific to treatment for Meniere's and the accompanying vertigo, tinnitus and hearing loss. I'm tagging @joyces @th1 @lacy2 @artist01 @trishanna @december1011 @cinnamonkat and others to see if they have treatment options to share with you.

So sorry to hear about the flare. How are you managing it at the moment?

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Hi RGB, many years ago my wife developed Meniere's. For unrelated reasons she adopted an exclusively plant-based diet and Voila! No more Meniere’s. Could be coincidence, but little to no risk with trying it.

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@colleenyoung

@rgbaker, I think you'll also be interested in this related discussion:
– Meniere's Disease https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/menieres-disease-2/

I modified the title of the discussion you started here to get experiences specific to treatment for Meniere's and the accompanying vertigo, tinnitus and hearing loss. I'm tagging @joyces @th1 @lacy2 @artist01 @trishanna @december1011 @cinnamonkat and others to see if they have treatment options to share with you.

So sorry to hear about the flare. How are you managing it at the moment?

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Hi. The best I can do is prochlorperazine and dimenhydrinate (used for travel sickness) and try to sleep
It away. Mostly I just have to wait it out which takes several days. I’ve been advised re low salt diet but must admit I find it very hard to do given my family’s tastes but that will have to change. From what I’ve read I will have to make more of an effort.

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@thumperguy

Hi RGB, many years ago my wife developed Meniere's. For unrelated reasons she adopted an exclusively plant-based diet and Voila! No more Meniere’s. Could be coincidence, but little to no risk with trying it.

Jump to this post

@thumperguy-thank you for this great contribution /advice. I often try to encourage people to look more from within when it comes to anything inflammatory related. Every bite we take can either fuel dis-ease or fight it.
Happy to hear your wife had resolution.

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@colleenyoung

@rgbaker, I think you'll also be interested in this related discussion:
– Meniere's Disease https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/menieres-disease-2/

I modified the title of the discussion you started here to get experiences specific to treatment for Meniere's and the accompanying vertigo, tinnitus and hearing loss. I'm tagging @joyces @th1 @lacy2 @artist01 @trishanna @december1011 @cinnamonkat and others to see if they have treatment options to share with you.

So sorry to hear about the flare. How are you managing it at the moment?

Jump to this post

Thank you ! My tinnitus is awful. Very depressing ..

Sent from my iPhone

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I've had Meniere's most of my life (now 79). Most Menierians find that their worst days are triggered by something. Instead of trying various diet approaches or eliminating other things people suggest, the sure-fire way to determine just what your trigger or triggers are is to keep a calendar, using a color to shade each day to indicate the kind of day it has been: good, bad, godawful. Then note even the slightest changes from what's normal for you. It can be lots of things: something you ate, less rest, a crisis in your life, less exercise…a looooong list! I know one person who found that dairy products were his trigger; once he eliminated them, he had no really bad days. I've heard of other dietary links to certain foods. While excess salt isn't good for anyone, that's the first thing that docs suggest…even though very few people find relief that way. Further, living with a severely restricted salt diet means that just one meal away from home can upset things. Better to avoid excess salt/salty foods than to try to live with a severe low-salt diet.

Some things simply cannot be avoided, and most Menierians react to stress, which isn't always possible to avoid. All we can do is try to avoid it when possible. After a good friend died, her husband asked me to speak at the memorial service about her request for him to plant a tree in her memory, to which he responded that he'd plant two trees side by side so that their limbs and roots could intertwine. They had always enjoyed a wonderful marriage, so it choked me up to give the speech…and I could hardly stumble down the two easy steps afterwards, nor was I able to climb up the front steps of their house for the gathering afterwards. (Ordinarily, I have learned to overcome my lack of natural balance and do lots of things that younger "norms" can't do.)

Another thing to consider is hormone levels. I noticed nearly 35 years ago that a large percentage of those who had real problems with the disease were post-menopausal women. Low hormone levels are my own personal trigger. Although my primary doc and I had figured out that low hormone levels were my trigger when I first became really ill in my 40s (after quitting birth control pills due to my age). It took us four years to find a doc who knew lots about hormones and was able to give us the formula for safe hormones: 2½ parts progesterone balanced against 1 part estrogen. After four years of having multi-hour vomit fests two or three times every week, I totally quit having them after less than a month on heavy doses of hormones. Later, I tapered down, probably too drastically, and went bilateral two years ago. For a year I wasn't able to find a local doc willing to prescribe hormones to someone in her late 70s, so I spent a year virtually deaf with increasing bouts of vertigo/vomiting. Once I got a prescription for temporarily large doses of hormones, the vomiting/vertigo ceased and, better yet, my hearing returned to the level where it had been prior to the year of isolation due to deafness. After a couple of months, I gradually cut the hormone dosage in half, and am now ready to try cutting it back again. Only one study about hormone levels and Meniere's has been done, that in China, but it is quite convincing.

Yet another thing is vestibular rehab. In order to live a normal, active life you need to learn to use your third balance system, proprioception. Then you need to due some exercises or work on it every day for the rest of your life: the rewards are great!

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