We're told to wear masks. How do we do it safely and properly?

Posted by jerrynord @jerrynord, Apr 23 11:43am

We are told not to touch our mouth, nose or eyes to prevent getting the virus.
If you can get the virus through your eyes, what good is wearing the mask?

Liked by EES1

@jerrynord Welcome to connect we aren't Dr,s but can help with all our conditions . As Far as wearing mask when you cough 0r sneeze those little droplet leave your mouth and if you have a virus you spread it to others . I wiould like to invite @ Colleen Young to this discussion she can answer this better then I can

REPLY

@jerrynord There are two reasons to wear a mask –
First, as you may have heard, anyone, whether symptomatic or not, can have this virus and spread it through droplets from their nose and mouth to others. Not just through coughing or sneezing, which really spray it to to wider area, but simply by exhaling as well. Wearing the mask as recommended protects others.
Second, when it comes to getting infected, the total amount of virus exposure and where it lands on you are both factors. The corona viruses are known to be able to attach to mucus membranes and the lungs. It is possible to get a virus through your eyes however, they are a much smaller target than the entire respiratory system, and a significant number of droplets would have to get right into your eyes to infect you, so less risk of infection there. I suppose if someone sneezed right into your face there would be heightened risk of transmission through the eyes.
So the key reason behind personal protection (the mask) plus increased social distancing, cleaning frequently touched surfaces, rigorous hand washing, and keeping hands off the face is to limit the amount of the virus that gets into the body and thereby reduce the likelihood of infection.
As a side note, the reason there is such a furor about the lack of adequate personal protective equipment (PPE) for health care providers and other front line personnel is that the TOTAL VIRAL LOAD they face day after day is what is causing so many to become so ill. That is why it is so important to also protect workers like those in the grocery store by keeping a safe distance – to minimize their risk. And why it is important to insist that medical workers be protected with proper attire.
Sue

REPLY

I thought this was interesting news to report.
The face masks we are told to wear in public, have some drawbacks.people have been getting dizzy, and even passed out wearing the mask.. Reason doctors are finding is because we normally breathe in oxygen, and exhale carbon dioxide. With the mask around our nose we are breathing in carbon dioxide, and not oxygen.
Interesting. Warned: DO NOT WEAR YOUR MASK WHEN DRIVING.
ITS A SITUATION OF YOU ARE DAMMED IF YOU DO, AND DAMMED IF YOU DONT.
the corona virus is serious stuff I don’t think anybody will rest easy until there is an antidote for this virus.
Stay safe

REPLY
@funcountess

I thought this was interesting news to report.
The face masks we are told to wear in public, have some drawbacks.people have been getting dizzy, and even passed out wearing the mask.. Reason doctors are finding is because we normally breathe in oxygen, and exhale carbon dioxide. With the mask around our nose we are breathing in carbon dioxide, and not oxygen.
Interesting. Warned: DO NOT WEAR YOUR MASK WHEN DRIVING.
ITS A SITUATION OF YOU ARE DAMMED IF YOU DO, AND DAMMED IF YOU DONT.
the corona virus is serious stuff I don’t think anybody will rest easy until there is an antidote for this virus.
Stay safe

Jump to this post

@funcountess You'll notice that I moved your post to this existing discussion called "We're told to wear masks. How do we do it safely and properly?"

Some people, especially people with compromised lung capacity, also find it difficult to breathe through some facemasks. I have not found the masks make me dizzy.

For me, the biggest concern is if people do not put on and take off masks properly. I'm particularly concerned when I see people driving between stores with the mask pulled down below their chin.

REPLY

@funcountess, I have been reading/hearing reports of individuals having trouble wearing masks as well. I started using a scarf in my front yard and on walks and like many others report, finding it much more difficult to breathe for any length of time. Perhaps changing from silk or poly to cotton, if I can find or buy handmade, would prove easier?

The idea of exhaling the carbon dioxide into covering sounds like a reasonable explanation for the difficulties some of us with compromised breathing and lung issues are experiencing.

REPLY
@funcountess

I thought this was interesting news to report.
The face masks we are told to wear in public, have some drawbacks.people have been getting dizzy, and even passed out wearing the mask.. Reason doctors are finding is because we normally breathe in oxygen, and exhale carbon dioxide. With the mask around our nose we are breathing in carbon dioxide, and not oxygen.
Interesting. Warned: DO NOT WEAR YOUR MASK WHEN DRIVING.
ITS A SITUATION OF YOU ARE DAMMED IF YOU DO, AND DAMMED IF YOU DONT.
the corona virus is serious stuff I don’t think anybody will rest easy until there is an antidote for this virus.
Stay safe

Jump to this post

@funcountess– Good morning. Yes, you are right, there are drawbacks to wearing masks. But unlike medical professionals who are attending ill patients for many hours at a time, people should only be wearing them for a short period of time because we are supposed to be at home. You will only be damned if you don't wear a mask because you could contact COVID-1! There are a lot of posts and videos and podcasts on Connect about the correct way to wear a mask, directions on how to make one and how to wash them, and how to take them on or off. People who ignore these many examples are taking huge chances.
It is a myth that you are breathing in co2 and exhaling oxygen. To properly fit a mask to your face, it should first be covering both your mouth and your nose. This is definitely more uncomfortable than just covering one's mouth with the face mask because you are breathing back in some of the exhaled air. … You MUST breathe in through your nose and out through your mouth.
https://cleanroomworld.com/blog/proper-way-to-breathe-using-a-face-mask/
I know that we aren't used to wearing masks and are uncomfortable wearing them. If you have had a problem with a mask, how have you solved it?

REPLY

@merepreb, I really appreciate this cleanroomworld article and information. I knew I was exhaling carbon dioxide by breathing in and out through the nose. It will take some practice to learn to breathe out through the mouth for those brief periods when infrequent approach by or to others.

REPLY
@merpreb

@funcountess– Good morning. Yes, you are right, there are drawbacks to wearing masks. But unlike medical professionals who are attending ill patients for many hours at a time, people should only be wearing them for a short period of time because we are supposed to be at home. You will only be damned if you don't wear a mask because you could contact COVID-1! There are a lot of posts and videos and podcasts on Connect about the correct way to wear a mask, directions on how to make one and how to wash them, and how to take them on or off. People who ignore these many examples are taking huge chances.
It is a myth that you are breathing in co2 and exhaling oxygen. To properly fit a mask to your face, it should first be covering both your mouth and your nose. This is definitely more uncomfortable than just covering one's mouth with the face mask because you are breathing back in some of the exhaled air. … You MUST breathe in through your nose and out through your mouth.
https://cleanroomworld.com/blog/proper-way-to-breathe-using-a-face-mask/
I know that we aren't used to wearing masks and are uncomfortable wearing them. If you have had a problem with a mask, how have you solved it?

Jump to this post

@merpreb Very good article but I don't see where it says you are not breathing in CO2, even when breathing correctly — in through the nose, out through the mouth. If you are breathing in exhaled air, isn't that primarily CO2? I guess I'm just confused. 🤷🏻‍♂️
Thanks for any helpful elaboration.
JK

REPLY

Some very important facets of using PPE are:
1. Make sure it's properly worn and not compromised (no holes, etc)
2. Once used, consider all PPE contaminated and they must be removed in an order and manner so as to not transfer that contamination to your body. (there are publications on donning and removing PPE.
3. Handle anything you touch with used PPE as contaminated whether it is or not. (don't pull your mask down with the gloves you just used)

If you're concerned about splatter (or microdroplets) getting in your eyes, you can wear safety glasses. If you wear prescription glasses you can find over-the-glasses safety specs. All they have to do is protect your eyes from airborne droplets from people coughing, sneezing, talking, etc. No agency that I know of has recommended safety glasses for the public, but there is nothing preventing you from wearing them. Responders and medical professionals, depending on their agency's rules, wear them when treating patients or doing procedures for this protection.

I worked for a number of years in a nuclear reactor environment and the control and protection from radioactive contamination is very similar to the type of controls being implemented for the public during this pandemic. In order to work in any nuclear environment where one will be entering/exiting areas where radiation dosage and radioactive contamination (radioactive material where we don't want it) is present one has to take a course and pass written and practical tests demonstrating a knowledge of this and the proper skills to don and remove anti-contamination gear, or they don't work there.

REPLY
@contentandwell

@merpreb Very good article but I don't see where it says you are not breathing in CO2, even when breathing correctly — in through the nose, out through the mouth. If you are breathing in exhaled air, isn't that primarily CO2? I guess I'm just confused. 🤷🏻‍♂️
Thanks for any helpful elaboration.
JK

Jump to this post

REPLY

Thank you, @merpreb That really is an interesting article. It's good to know that CO2 is not a problem.
For those of you who do not want to bother going to the link, here is what the article says:
"There is a myth that if u wear a mask, u breathe your own exhaled CO2. Firstly, the space between your face and the mask is 40-50mm. You breathe and exhale about 500ml of air with each breath. Frankly, the 8-10% air that u may RE-breathe with a mask without an exhale valve actually makes your lungs stronger – like a training mask, as seen in the movie Pink. Doctors actually recommend those masks that RE-circulate CO2 to high performing athletes for improved lung function."
The author is Richa Upadhyay, here are her credentials:
Studied at Makhanlal Chaturvedi National University of Journalism and Communication
Lives in Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
So frankly I am not sure what qualifies her to answer the question, but the answer does make sense. I would prefer to see something by someone who had better qualifications though.
JK

REPLY
@contentandwell

Thank you, @merpreb That really is an interesting article. It's good to know that CO2 is not a problem.
For those of you who do not want to bother going to the link, here is what the article says:
"There is a myth that if u wear a mask, u breathe your own exhaled CO2. Firstly, the space between your face and the mask is 40-50mm. You breathe and exhale about 500ml of air with each breath. Frankly, the 8-10% air that u may RE-breathe with a mask without an exhale valve actually makes your lungs stronger – like a training mask, as seen in the movie Pink. Doctors actually recommend those masks that RE-circulate CO2 to high performing athletes for improved lung function."
The author is Richa Upadhyay, here are her credentials:
Studied at Makhanlal Chaturvedi National University of Journalism and Communication
Lives in Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
So frankly I am not sure what qualifies her to answer the question, but the answer does make sense. I would prefer to see something by someone who had better qualifications though.
JK

Jump to this post

@contentandwell– There's also some common sense here too. If we can inhale O2 why can't we exhale Co2? The CO2 is actually smaller. The masks' holes are much much larger than these molecules. If people are fainting or getting dizzy then maybe there are underlying causes. There are way too many myths that need to stop.

Liked by lioness

REPLY
@merpreb

@contentandwell– There's also some common sense here too. If we can inhale O2 why can't we exhale Co2? The CO2 is actually smaller. The masks' holes are much much larger than these molecules. If people are fainting or getting dizzy then maybe there are underlying causes. There are way too many myths that need to stop.

Jump to this post

@merpreb When I realized that the author was not really qualified to be answering this question I did a little googling and found info on the NCBI (The National Center for Biotechnology Information) website:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23514282
Basically it says,
"PRACTITIONER SUMMARY:
Carbon dioxide (CO2) rebreathing in respiratory protective devices (RPDs) has been highlighted as a key concern regarding respirator use. However, the problem is relatively under researched. This paper presents novel findings on the impact of phonic respiration (breathing during speech) and CO2 concentrations in RPDs."
There is more in the actual article. I find this to be a very reliable and legitimate site for health information.

I personally have been wearing facemasks when flying ever since my transplant and have not had a breathing problem. I do find them very annoying though. Another consideration that I have read in the past, is if you have to wear a disposable face mask for more than two hours, you should change it for a new one. In that amount of time the bacteria that have accumulated on the mask make it ineffective.
It really is a complex topic and one that most of us are still confused about, particularly since the initial information said NOT to wear facemasks. Those of us who have had transplants and been advised to wear facemasks may be a bit ahead of those who have never had a need to wear them.
JK

REPLY

@merpreb Yesterday I wore my mask and went to grocery store and pharmacy it was a total of 2-30 hours This morning I'm still dizzy so I think I'm going to wear a different mask to let that Co2 escape maybe just a silk handkerchief

REPLY
@lioness

@merpreb Yesterday I wore my mask and went to grocery store and pharmacy it was a total of 2-30 hours This morning I'm still dizzy so I think I'm going to wear a different mask to let that Co2 escape maybe just a silk handkerchief

Jump to this post

@lioness– Are you inhaling through your nose and exhaling through your mouth?

REPLY
Please login or register to post a reply.