Does hearing continue to deteriorate after exposure to noise stops?

Posted by aba @aba, Nov 6, 2021

please try to help
When hearing impaired (especially at a young age), whether it is from loud music or being in a noisy environment (a soldier in NOISY AREA for years)

Does the hearing continue to deteriorate even after you stop being in a noisy environment? Or if noise stops also stops a continuous decrease Is there a difference, regarding the continued deterioration in hearing, between acoustic damage resulting from a sudden noise (explosion for example) and which has not disappeared,

And permanent acoustic sabotage after several years of exposure to noise and the hearing deterioration continues though slowly?

M PELEG

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Hearing Loss group.

@aba

all "clever" audiologists say that hearing loss stops after leaving a noisy envuronment. no one can bring academic papers about but I am sure that you may lose hearing more and more without any other variable but not so quickly as before. I need academic research and academic papers! I know other parameters of hearing loss but everyone who is in this kind of lossing- everyone is unique and not as another one. The academic base is needed. thanks

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May I make a suggestion please? Academic papers are available to all of us via the wonders of the Internet.

Those of us communicating on Connect are all seekers of the best possible information we look for the science and research based information. As a participant and volunteer mentor in Lung Health and Joint & Bone Health groups I spend many hours finding, reading and sharing the best available information. Many other groups are enriched by the research efforts of their participants, since the world of health and disease is far too extensive for any one person to have answers to all the questions at their fingertips. I am also a person with hearing loss who worked in noisy environments, but I have no time for another research topic.

Would you possibly consider becoming a researcher of academic and scientific information about noise-induced hearing loss? When you find the specific information you are seeking, you could then share it with the rest of us. I am sure there are many of us who would be grateful.
Sue

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@sueinmn

May I make a suggestion please? Academic papers are available to all of us via the wonders of the Internet.

Those of us communicating on Connect are all seekers of the best possible information we look for the science and research based information. As a participant and volunteer mentor in Lung Health and Joint & Bone Health groups I spend many hours finding, reading and sharing the best available information. Many other groups are enriched by the research efforts of their participants, since the world of health and disease is far too extensive for any one person to have answers to all the questions at their fingertips. I am also a person with hearing loss who worked in noisy environments, but I have no time for another research topic.

Would you possibly consider becoming a researcher of academic and scientific information about noise-induced hearing loss? When you find the specific information you are seeking, you could then share it with the rest of us. I am sure there are many of us who would be grateful.
Sue

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I will and I am now collecting all about it. there are some articles but I need more in order to establish a complete conclusion

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@aba

THIS IS NOT THE ANSWER. WE KNOW ALL ABOUT HEARING LOSS BUT NOT THE EXACT ANSWER TO THIS QUEATION. YOU MISS THE MAIN POINT.

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Hi @aba, I'd like to direct you to the Community Guidelines: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/blog/about-connect/tab/community-guidelines/ which suggest not writing in ALL CAPS as this is considered shouting and rude.

I realize that you are frustrated. Members have been gracious and resourceful in trying to help you find answers to the questions you are asking. They are not missing the point. It may be that the information you seek doesn't exist. Repeating the question or shouting it, doesn't make it appear. As Sue suggests, let's work together to find what answers there may be by searching the Internet, which is open to all. I suggest you conduct an advance search using Google Scholar https://scholar.google.com/ This will return results for advance reading. Best of luck in your search and I look forward to hearing what you learn in your search and in discussions with audiology specialists.

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i will but is anyone else interested in this subject?

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writing in ALL CAPS as this is considered shouting and rude????????????????????????????

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@aba

i will but is anyone else interested in this subject?

Jump to this post

I think that from the number of people who joined this conversation, you can safely assume there is a lot of interest. I for one want to know what you find, and I am sure @julieo4 will be very happy to have more evidence-based information to share with the Hearing Loss group.
Thank you for agreeing to help out.
Sue

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those who joined tried to explain what is hearing loss and how to prevent it. no one took the time to think about the question.

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@aba

writing in ALL CAPS as this is considered shouting and rude????????????????????????????

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Hmm… here is all I will say about the matter – "netiquette" – since the inception of email and on-line forums, has always help that typing in all caps is not polite communication. (https://www.netmanners.com/272/caps-formatting-dont-matter/ or https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2012/10/what-we-talk-about-when-we-talk-about-caps-lock/263941/ ) Many groups have this caution or restriction in their community guidelines.

Way back in high school typing class (prior to PC's and before email was ever contemplated) we were taught that typing a letter in all caps was rude – so I guess it is not a new thing.

Since this is far off topic, I will have no more comment on the matter.
Sue

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@aba

THIS IS NOT THE ANSWER. WE KNOW ALL ABOUT HEARING LOSS BUT NOT THE EXACT ANSWER TO THIS QUEATION. YOU MISS THE MAIN POINT.

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No need to yell, man. Maybe you should go to your nearest medical University and invest some time in the library. Librarians are incredibly helpful. I did that when I was dx w/renal disease.

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@sueinmn

I think that from the number of people who joined this conversation, you can safely assume there is a lot of interest. I for one want to know what you find, and I am sure @julieo4 will be very happy to have more evidence-based information to share with the Hearing Loss group.
Thank you for agreeing to help out.
Sue

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More evidenced based research is always welcome. I look forward to learning more about what you learn. Thanks in advance for taking the time to do that. Julie

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In my case, my hearing loss resulted from a sudden close by 5" gun shooting aboard ship.. on my left side.. from my understanding of the hearing specialist years later.. the hair like hearing sensors in the inner ear were flattened by that big noise and they would never recover.. hearing not so loud rock music for example..does allow those inner ear sensors to recover some in time…. so my understanding is that depending upon the power in dB and pressure of that first shock to the hearing system…will determine recovery time or even the possibility of recovery..

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If you have lost 40% of your hearing it is lost forever mainly because you have hair cell damage. If you have been tested for hearing aids the aids will never restore the loss however they will slow down the brain from straining to hear sounds which will in most cases slow down any future hearing loss and provide you with quality of life and longevity. I hope this helps..

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