Living in the present and actions to reduce anxiety

Posted by BoneHead @stsopoci, Jun 11, 2019

Sometimes I spend way too much time in the future and have to just get busy doing any thing to kick myself back into Now time. I’m GAD and I realize that anxiety about anything is a trap for me. I have several escape actions that help me. I can go to the cabin and chill out and do the simple life or I can exercise or play on the piano. What ways do others find to help their anxiety?

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@dollardylan1

Hello everyone! I suffered with anxiety for many years and I thank God that I have not been on many medications. I am currently on Pristiq 50 mg. I have to tell you that having a relationship with God has been the greatest help for me. Coming to know who God is that He is an awesome Father you can talk to 24/7. He is there to help us in our time of need. Reading the bible, having close fellowship with other believers who will support you and give you encouragement! Learning to trust Him and knowing He has us in Whatever situation we face! If you do not know God I suggest you get to know Him for the awesome Father He is. Does it mean I won’t have anxiety at times, troubles, hardships etc. Not, it just means I will have a friend and Father to run to. Jesus suffered on the cross , so we too will suffer. All he wants is our hearts. Do you know where you will spend eternity?.

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@suz55

I have had depression and anxiety for most of my life. It is in my DNA, unfortunately. I live in Midwest so experience shorter days, less sunshine etc this time of year. I have thought about trying light therapy but am skeptical
Please share your experience if you have tried one and if positive results where I can find a good one. Thank you.

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Hello, @suz55 – from what you said about depression and anxiety being in your DNA, I'm wondering if perhaps you have relatives who have also dealt with these?

I also live in the Midwest, and the amount of sunshine is indeed different than when I lived in the West, in the Denver area, which is known for over 300 days of sunshine per year. I also have depression and anxiety, but I'm not sure if I've seen any seasonal difference.

A relative of mine got his own light box for use over the winter by ordering it on the internet, and he thought it helped a great deal. @merpreb @jh31251 @joyces @jakedduck1 @johnhans have all mentioned light box therapy in discussions on Connect and may have some thoughts for you on it, and whether they have personally tried it and where to source one.

Are you noticing a significant difference in your moods in the wintertime, suz55?

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@lisalucier

Hello, @suz55 – from what you said about depression and anxiety being in your DNA, I'm wondering if perhaps you have relatives who have also dealt with these?

I also live in the Midwest, and the amount of sunshine is indeed different than when I lived in the West, in the Denver area, which is known for over 300 days of sunshine per year. I also have depression and anxiety, but I'm not sure if I've seen any seasonal difference.

A relative of mine got his own light box for use over the winter by ordering it on the internet, and he thought it helped a great deal. @merpreb @jh31251 @joyces @jakedduck1 @johnhans have all mentioned light box therapy in discussions on Connect and may have some thoughts for you on it, and whether they have personally tried it and where to source one.

Are you noticing a significant difference in your moods in the wintertime, suz55?

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@suz55 the evidence for light box therapy is not proven. However, as noted, some people say they have seen improvement with it. I do know that extended periods of cloudy weather like what is happening now in the middle of the USA, can lead to feeling more depressed. If you would like to try a light box, you could talk with your doctor about what they think of it and if there is any reason for you to get one. If they do approve of you getting one, then getting a prescription for one from your doctor would be good because sometimes insurance will pay for it when you get a prescription.

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@johnhans

@suz55 the evidence for light box therapy is not proven. However, as noted, some people say they have seen improvement with it. I do know that extended periods of cloudy weather like what is happening now in the middle of the USA, can lead to feeling more depressed. If you would like to try a light box, you could talk with your doctor about what they think of it and if there is any reason for you to get one. If they do approve of you getting one, then getting a prescription for one from your doctor would be good because sometimes insurance will pay for it when you get a prescription.

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@suz55 – my doctor recommended using this type of light. Her son used one with good results. I tend to think positively when trying a new way to help make myself feel better. Keeping this in mind it has worked very well for me. Also I used it during the summer because during very humid weather I'm house bound do to lung cancer.
I can't tell why my attitude is what it is. I think that it's stubbornness.
You also have to move! You need to get outside if you can and exercise. I know how impossible this can seem but it's a must!

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@lisalucier

Hello, @suz55 – from what you said about depression and anxiety being in your DNA, I'm wondering if perhaps you have relatives who have also dealt with these?

I also live in the Midwest, and the amount of sunshine is indeed different than when I lived in the West, in the Denver area, which is known for over 300 days of sunshine per year. I also have depression and anxiety, but I'm not sure if I've seen any seasonal difference.

A relative of mine got his own light box for use over the winter by ordering it on the internet, and he thought it helped a great deal. @merpreb @jh31251 @joyces @jakedduck1 @johnhans have all mentioned light box therapy in discussions on Connect and may have some thoughts for you on it, and whether they have personally tried it and where to source one.

Are you noticing a significant difference in your moods in the wintertime, suz55?

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@lisalucier This is my first winter in my new state. Like you mentioned, I moved from an area where there is a lot of sunshine. Here, there have been many "grumpy days" as I call them, with overcast/showers/rain. Even a half hour of sunshine is cause [for me, at least!] to do a happy dance and get outside. Learning to be joyful outside even if the sun is not showing, telling myself that there is sun somewhere behind those clouds, and just getting outside, helps. It seems to help to challenge myself to be happy with the weather each day, no matter where it lies on the spectrum.
Ginger

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I'm originally from Chicago and suffered with SDS , sun deprivation syndrome, for 41 years. Then I moved to Santa fe, new Mexico, and south Florida, and St. Simon's island, Georgia, then Asheville, north Carolina, and now southwest Colorado. I did have a light box in Chicago. My mood improved considerably when I lived where there was sun and water. I also used full spectrum light bulbs in all lamps…even with overhead lighting. I always start sliding down when days are cloudy. I do have lots of lamps and different light bulbs and lampshades that offer soft lighting. I also have an aromatherapy lamp that changes colors, and is soothing. Working with lighting and colors is something that helps me.

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Hi 👋 uWe used to live in beautiful Chatham on cape cod but beautiful turned to dismal after December when darkness an grayness. We’re the norm after 4pm. So we purchased the LIGHT AND GOUNF IT HELPED A LOT TO LESSEN THE SADNESS. also recommended by doctor for morning wake up problems when no sun is visible

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@qualityoverload

Hi 👋 uWe used to live in beautiful Chatham on cape cod but beautiful turned to dismal after December when darkness an grayness. We’re the norm after 4pm. So we purchased the LIGHT AND GOUNF IT HELPED A LOT TO LESSEN THE SADNESS. also recommended by doctor for morning wake up problems when no sun is visible

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Thanks for your input. I am going to try it. Haven’t seen the sun in 5 days and counting.

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Hi everyone! My stomach is always in a knot and – no matter what method I employ – I still get those waves of nervousness, nausea and feelings of doom on occasion. Some doctors and pharmacists suggest that aging plays a big role in developing anxiety disorders. Every aspect of your mind and body become less resilient. Since aging is inevitable, I am trying to accept the fact that I may never feel as well as I once did. Meditation, body scan meditation, and a dose of Prozac are all helping me rein in the anxiety beast. But I still keep hoping for a “cure”!!

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I also want to add a couple of my thoughts about living in the present. I’m 75. In the past year I have lost 5 friends. I thought I was handling these life issues well but my anxiety attacks increased markedly over the past year. I often try to envision life without my wonderful husband, and I simply cannot. So there’s a simmering fear of that challenge. I do make every effort to be mindful of the present and practice gratefulness for our present good health and other blessings. Making a list of these assets has helped me. When I get “spooked” about the what-ifs, I read that list. It helps me to live in the present.

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I think that is an excellent practice! Counting our blessings instead of focusing on our fears! I am so sorry for your loss! You have have a lot to deal with, with the loss of 5 friends! May you take time to grieve your losses. I think it is the uncertainty and that we have no control is the hardest thing. That ultimately God is in control of our circumstances and our future. At least that is what I believe! May you find peace and rest in Him.

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@annedodrill44

Hi everyone! My stomach is always in a knot and – no matter what method I employ – I still get those waves of nervousness, nausea and feelings of doom on occasion. Some doctors and pharmacists suggest that aging plays a big role in developing anxiety disorders. Every aspect of your mind and body become less resilient. Since aging is inevitable, I am trying to accept the fact that I may never feel as well as I once did. Meditation, body scan meditation, and a dose of Prozac are all helping me rein in the anxiety beast. But I still keep hoping for a “cure”!!

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@annedodrill44 Try practising what in Yoga is called "Pranayama." It is a method of breathing. Some people call it Meditation. Please google it for detailed information. God bless you.

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