Autism & the difficulty of getting & doing a job

Posted by usernameca @usernameca, Sep 28, 2018

Have you noticed it is difficult to get hired? And if you do get hired, have you noticed how it’s almost impossible to do the job? If people with Autism don’t stand up for their rights, no one else is going to. And in my opinion, no one has.

I didn't know I was autistic, am autistic. I.m 64 years old. Diagnosed bipolar 14 years ago. Never tested or whatever 4 autistic. But my mother can list the symptoms still – NO touching #1. Still my #1. No noise. When I was young, even in elementary school, if I was involved in a project – LEAVE ME ALONE. On the positive side, I've gotten super jobs in computer research, night jobs with FEW people, people like me. Find a high tech computer lab – Intel, HewletPackard, DEll. Don't TELL them you're autistic. Just flaunt your capabilities. SHOW them what you can do. They'll snap you up, pay you big bucks and be grateful.

REPLY
@gingerw

@sirgalahad I for one, am glad you did not follow through with that plan. How scary for you! Our minds often work at warp speed, so fast the thoughts tumble faster than we can make sense of them. Hoping you are feeling better, and can see the lightness every day. I had a saying on my board, that said something like "there is no strong shadow without much light". And the reverse holds true, also.
Ginger

Jump to this post

thanks gingerw bear hugs

REPLY
@hopeful33250

As you can see @sirgalahad there are many of us who are here for you.

Jump to this post

bear hugs and cuddles and thanks heaps

REPLY
@stlouisgmajenn

I didn't know I was autistic, am autistic. I.m 64 years old. Diagnosed bipolar 14 years ago. Never tested or whatever 4 autistic. But my mother can list the symptoms still – NO touching #1. Still my #1. No noise. When I was young, even in elementary school, if I was involved in a project – LEAVE ME ALONE. On the positive side, I've gotten super jobs in computer research, night jobs with FEW people, people like me. Find a high tech computer lab – Intel, HewletPackard, DEll. Don't TELL them you're autistic. Just flaunt your capabilities. SHOW them what you can do. They'll snap you up, pay you big bucks and be grateful.

Jump to this post

I appreciate your post, @stlouisgmajenn, because it sounds as if you have learned to make the most of your abilities and to find the right fit in your employment.

REPLY
@kanaazpereira

Hi @usernameca,

I'm also tagging Mentor @mamacita @sirgalahad to bring them into this conversation.

Along with advocating, I do think that educating people and employers, about the benefits of hiring those on the autism spectrum, is crucial as well. People are hesitant because they are unfamiliar with how a person with autism will perform on a job. Employers need to be made aware about the tremendous skills that those with autism can bring to the work place.

Another reason education is important is that today's work culture has shifted focus to include communication and 'social' skills, as criteria for hiring – and from what I've learned, on Connect and elsewhere, this is not easy for many on the autism spectrum. So, if employers or interviewers are educated and can understand the behavior or actions of a potential candidate who may have autism, the process and the opportunity for getting a job would be far better.

These are just my thoughts, and I'd really like to learn more from all your insights.

Jump to this post

You are correct! People fear the unknown so unless they have had experience with a disability or a diverse individual they will not "get it". Good news is that many many companies are moving towards diversity hiring initiatives. Not only to hire but to educate their current employees, understand accommodations, etc. It is a slow process because of so many people involved but at conferences, etc. all the buzz is about this and how to make the change etc. Hope is on the horizon!

REPLY

Thank you for your forum for this particular topic.My 22 y.o. son,who is in his 3rd yr of college is having the toughest time finding a job.I forgot to mention has high functioning autism.If you have any suggestions, please leave me a message.Thankyou kindly.

REPLY
@harleneq

Thank you for your forum for this particular topic.My 22 y.o. son,who is in his 3rd yr of college is having the toughest time finding a job.I forgot to mention has high functioning autism.If you have any suggestions, please leave me a message.Thankyou kindly.

Jump to this post

I can give you many suggestions but not sure if all will apply to you. His ability to find a job might depend on the type of work he seeks, his schedule, his transportation and the geographic area. In general, he should network as much as possible. If he's not comfortable doing it in person, he can do it on social sites. He should join LinkedIn Alumni groups for his college and also for his major. He can then post the type of work/schedule he's seeking. Also, check local unemployment offices for postings, staffing firms if he has full days available to work, etc. He can search using the term part time or internship (some are paid). He can also check local Facebook groups about jobs. Of course, he should work with his college's placement office as well. There are some staffing firms that work with individuals having disabilities if he wants to self identify and work with them. I hope this is helpful if there are any specific queries you have do not hesitate to ask.

REPLY
@calypso

I can give you many suggestions but not sure if all will apply to you. His ability to find a job might depend on the type of work he seeks, his schedule, his transportation and the geographic area. In general, he should network as much as possible. If he's not comfortable doing it in person, he can do it on social sites. He should join LinkedIn Alumni groups for his college and also for his major. He can then post the type of work/schedule he's seeking. Also, check local unemployment offices for postings, staffing firms if he has full days available to work, etc. He can search using the term part time or internship (some are paid). He can also check local Facebook groups about jobs. Of course, he should work with his college's placement office as well. There are some staffing firms that work with individuals having disabilities if he wants to self identify and work with them. I hope this is helpful if there are any specific queries you have do not hesitate to ask.

Jump to this post

To piggyback on what @calypso said, the website indeed.com could be a valuable source for positions.
Ginger

REPLY
@gingerw

@sirgalahad Everyone around this cyber table is here for you. Please let me know how I may help?
Ginger

Jump to this post

gingerw sorries imissed this post but i was very deep indoodoo of depression and suicidal thoughts .sorries bear hugs right now i can offer u a shoulder whilst you work thru your own distress after a 1,000 oak shooting and the fires ,.tajke care hugs and i hope you are back home or some where safe and secure and not in your car

REPLY

A few posts were removed from this discussion. Please know that personal attacks are never tolerated on Mayo Clinic Connect as per our community guidelines (https://connect.mayoclinic.org/page/about-connect/tab/community-guidelines/) which remind us to:
– Remain respectful at all times.
– Exercise tolerance and respect toward other participants whose views may differ from your own. Disagreements are fine, but mutual respect is a must.
– Personal attacks against members or health care providers are not acceptable. Such posts will be removed.

Our community members should feel safe, which is why we monitor the conversations. If anyone has any questions or concerns about this action or the guidelines, feel free to contact one of the moderators or Mayo Clinic Connect Director, Colleen Young, using this form: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/contact-a-community-moderator/

REPLY
@usernameca

Thanks for responding. Can I ask, what was a job you applied for that you think was a good fit, looking back? Also, was it a Mayo psychiatrist who diagnosed you? If I knew what I know now, I probably would have spent most of my life staying home, watching TV. I'm not kidding. So it's a good thing that I didn't know what I know now. 🙂

Jump to this post

I heartily agree with you, dear @usernameca. I am retired now, and work only on a volunteer basis. I did not know until very late in the game that I was wired differently than 99.9% of all my co-workers and employers. I remember very clearly the day I sat in the "break" room and reslized, to my horror, that I was not understanding a word that they were saying!

Now, you must understand that I have always had a gift of understanding people with foreign accents. I grew up in a multi cultural environment and quickly jumped on board with a huge desire to understand orhers. But in that room, that day, I felt like I was from another planet.

I was in despair. I had no idea what was going on with me. I had never been around people who spoke that way. I honestly didn't think I would survive rhere. My phone us dying. I must go now, but I will be back to tell you the rest of you story.

Have an Ausome day, me lovelies!

Mamacita

REPLY

People at work teased each other unmercifully. It was the worst example of it that I had ever seen. What I didn't realize was that it was their normal. It was how they dealt with the stress of dealing with fifty juvenile delinquents five days a week

That job, which I detested at first, came to be the place where I was the happiest. I was forced to shed some layers, grow a backbone, and learn how to speak the language. I kept my own identity, but I learned to relax a bit. I started becoming comfortable in my own skin.

Talk with you later. Gotta close my eyes for a bit!

Mamacita

REPLY
Please sign in or register to post a reply.