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mikefox909
@mikefox909

Posts: 8
Joined: May 08, 2016

How does a person develop skipped heart beats?

Posted by @mikefox909, May 8, 2016

I Would like to know how does a person develop skipped heart beats (palpitations) and what it’s the best preventive cure for them. I am 58 yrs old and treating my hypertension with losartan, amlodipine at night, and taking propanolol as well. My BP is under control. I’m wondering if skipped heart beats can be cured or are they a life time thing. Are there any solutions? Thx for reading my question……

REPLY

Hi @mikefox909. Welcome to Connect. I’m glad you found our community. According to Mayo Clinic, heart palpitations are the feelings of having rapid, fluttering or pounding heart. They can be triggered by stress, exercise, medication or, rarely, a medical condition. Given the number of medications you are on, there could be a connection. A skipping heart beat is actually an arrhythmia and a more serious problem. Here is some information about palpitations: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/heart-palpitations/basics/definition/con-20034780. And here is some info about arrhythmia: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/heart-arrhythmia/home/ovc-20188123. Have you considered seeing a cardiologist to determine the cause of the issue and discuss treatment options? I think that would be a good idea!

I’m also tagging @pamelafrye1, @RCRH, @frankie999, @ellyons87, @cyndiblaw, @DiannaTV and @kcollins719 who have posted about palpitations and arrhythmia in the past and may be able to provide some insight or support.

Thank you very much for your reply. My work insurance should become effective on 5/11/16 at which time I will be looking for a cardiologist under out with network. I have been doing well for most part but I have noticed with stress it does kick in at times. That’s when the propanolol has been the most effective. Thx for the advice. I will follow up on the web sites you provided and with this forum as much as I can. It seems to be very helpful. I appreciate evening. Thx…Mike

@kelseydm

Hi @mikefox909. Welcome to Connect. I’m glad you found our community. According to Mayo Clinic, heart palpitations are the feelings of having rapid, fluttering or pounding heart. They can be triggered by stress, exercise, medication or, rarely, a medical condition. Given the number of medications you are on, there could be a connection. A skipping heart beat is actually an arrhythmia and a more serious problem. Here is some information about palpitations: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/heart-palpitations/basics/definition/con-20034780. And here is some info about arrhythmia: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/heart-arrhythmia/home/ovc-20188123. Have you considered seeing a cardiologist to determine the cause of the issue and discuss treatment options? I think that would be a good idea!

I’m also tagging @pamelafrye1, @RCRH, @frankie999, @ellyons87, @cyndiblaw, @DiannaTV and @kcollins719 who have posted about palpitations and arrhythmia in the past and may be able to provide some insight or support.

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Both skipping heart beats and atrial fibrillation are difficult to diagnosis as to cause, in my disappointing experience. Cardiologists tend to deal with them just as they deal with hypertension — which they usually characterize as “essential hypertension,” the cause of which 1) is not apparent and 2) apparently is not worth tracking down. One of the best cardiologists around the Washington DC area gave me a consultation; the upshot was a plan for testing an arsenal of medications until either 1) the a-fib is controlled, 2) it is regarded as “essential” (thus of unknown cause), or 3) a series of expensive surgical treatments is exhausted. I advise that you find a dedicated cardiologist who is willing to do the hard work of diagnosis to find a cause, then go from there. If hypertension is your main problem, leave the cardiologist’s office and track down the best nephrologist you can find.

@kelseydm

Hi @mikefox909. Welcome to Connect. I’m glad you found our community. According to Mayo Clinic, heart palpitations are the feelings of having rapid, fluttering or pounding heart. They can be triggered by stress, exercise, medication or, rarely, a medical condition. Given the number of medications you are on, there could be a connection. A skipping heart beat is actually an arrhythmia and a more serious problem. Here is some information about palpitations: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/heart-palpitations/basics/definition/con-20034780. And here is some info about arrhythmia: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/heart-arrhythmia/home/ovc-20188123. Have you considered seeing a cardiologist to determine the cause of the issue and discuss treatment options? I think that would be a good idea!

I’m also tagging @pamelafrye1, @RCRH, @frankie999, @ellyons87, @cyndiblaw, @DiannaTV and @kcollins719 who have posted about palpitations and arrhythmia in the past and may be able to provide some insight or support.

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Hi, I really appreciate your response. Currently I have not experienced
much palpitations lately. They usually occur with stress or after eating
when I’m feeling full and having to get back to work after lunch. My pulse
remains at normal levels. BP has been stable. Quick question why a
nephrologist. Sounds interesting. Thx….Mike.

Hey @teatime, I’m wondering if you’d like to weigh in on this conversation?

@mikefox909

Thank you very much for your reply. My work insurance should become effective on 5/11/16 at which time I will be looking for a cardiologist under out with network. I have been doing well for most part but I have noticed with stress it does kick in at times. That’s when the propanolol has been the most effective. Thx for the advice. I will follow up on the web sites you provided and with this forum as much as I can. It seems to be very helpful. I appreciate evening. Thx…Mike

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My reply to your question about why a nephrologist didn’t get through, so here it is: Nephrologist is the first choice under the protocols of my HMO, because the kidney – more than any other organ (except the brain) – controls blood pressure. In my case, I had two nephrologists work on me. The first used the medically popular approach of testing a succession of medications in search of a combination that would control my BP with few adverse side effects; after reaching a point where I was taking huge loads of potassium sulfate pills each day, I asked for a second opinion. My second nephrologist took an approach I had hoped for – extensive testing in search of the cause of my hypertension, with the help of an endocrinologist who tracked the influence of several glands and their hormone output. She found an inherited malfunction of my kidney – first, reclaiming sodium the kidney had removed, then failing to reclaim potassium it had removed. On that basis, she prescribed a medication that is rarely used these days; it is a potassium-sparing diuretic. I may not be quite accurate medically, but I feel confident unofficially that low potassium was not the result of high BP, but BP was the result of low potassium and reclaimed sodium that kept water levels too high in my tissues.

@mikefox909

Thank you very much for your reply. My work insurance should become effective on 5/11/16 at which time I will be looking for a cardiologist under out with network. I have been doing well for most part but I have noticed with stress it does kick in at times. That’s when the propanolol has been the most effective. Thx for the advice. I will follow up on the web sites you provided and with this forum as much as I can. It seems to be very helpful. I appreciate evening. Thx…Mike

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Thank you for your reply. It has been long since that I have wanted to
research the origin of my hypertension. Though my current medication
regimen is doing a pretty good job of keeping my BP in check, I’m almost
some what forced to keep it the way it is for the fact that they are
working. I’m currently taking losarten 100/12.5, propanolol 10mg at around
noon and 2.5 mg amlodipine in the evening to maintain a 24 hr med level
around the clock. I also take 112 mcg levothiroxin in the a.m. And
buproprion 100mg which I don’t think I really need. I am looking for a
specialist to help me re-evaluate my med intake. One doctor said I was on
too many bp meds, that I needed to get of the toprol 12.5 I was taking at
the time. That was a trip after taking it for so long. I did get off it
little by little. Then after an incident that landed me at the ER because I
was off the toprol for a couple of days combined with a couple of drinks
too much ( and I truly mean a couple drinks) my htn went sky high and with
all the symptoms that go with it. After seeing a cardiologist he put me
back on propanolol, not only does it help with the bp but it has a sort of
calming effect on me that helps with my anxiety. So, that’s where I’m at
right now. As soon as my insurance kicks in from work, my goal is to
resolve all this. If any suggestions plz advise. Thx for listening.
Mike…..

@mikefox909

Thank you very much for your reply. My work insurance should become effective on 5/11/16 at which time I will be looking for a cardiologist under out with network. I have been doing well for most part but I have noticed with stress it does kick in at times. That’s when the propanolol has been the most effective. Thx for the advice. I will follow up on the web sites you provided and with this forum as much as I can. It seems to be very helpful. I appreciate evening. Thx…Mike

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I repeat my earlier recommendation that you find a good nephrologist to help with the review of your meds. Your first question to her should be, “Am I over-medicating my BP?” I’m familiar with your current regimen, although I don’t use it. It has some good facets.

@colleenyoung

Hey @teatime, I’m wondering if you’d like to weigh in on this conversation?

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Hi everyone, thanks for including me in on the conversation. I am still keeping my BP down by lifestyle and diet changes, and hopefully I´ll be able to maintain this for a bit. I am really committed to the DASH diet right now. I still have one more cardio appt and test to go through next week. I have a nephrologist in my family and we talked about the importance of getting checked by a nephrologist, too. A lot of my blood work came back normal, so that has taken the urgency off of a nephro check. Honestly I have had so many appointments I haven’t thought of seeing a new specialist but I am going to talk to my cardiologist next appt.

Liked by wandikarnadi

When ever i feel full or bloated i have heart palpitation. They can last all day or for several days all day long. I can move the gas around by pushing on my upper abdomen. Is this normal and does anyone else experience these?

Welcome @runningwolf1957. I moved your message to this discussion thread started by @mikefox909 related to heart palpitations. @kelseydm provided some relevant resources to help with your research and @predictable offers some great information from his experience. I bet @cyndiblaw could also add insight to this question.

@runningwolf1957 have you spoken to a cardiologist or GI specialist about this?

@runningwolf1957

When ever i feel full or bloated i have heart palpitation. They can last all day or for several days all day long. I can move the gas around by pushing on my upper abdomen. Is this normal and does anyone else experience these?

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@runningwolf1957, I think @colleenyoung has made the best first suggestion: Speak to a cardiologist AND a GI specialist about this. Can your palpitations be described as “skipped heart beats” or as rapid, beating pulse? The difference is important. With a better understanding of your situation, I might be able to tell you about similar experiences I have had, but in the end, I will recommend that — whatever I can say as a patient and layman — your best advice will come from doctors who are medical specialists in the conditions you are experiencing. I’ll be watching this discussion to see whether you are getting your problem under control. I wish you well in that.

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