Heat Intolerance: Symptom of Neuropathy?

Posted by kyc117 @kyc117, Sep 7, 2020

So I am waiting to get my diagnosis, but does anyone else feel odd after being out in the heat for a period of time? I love gardening this weekend was watering for about 20 minutes in the sun. I just felt weird afterwards, symptoms I can't explain. Sweat will just roll down my face, this never happened with me before.I love to take hot showers and one time I felt somewhat ill afterwards. I just feel I can't be out in the heat anymore.

@bustrbrwn22

@sunnyflower thank you for giving the gift of your time to me! Anything you can send is appreciated. I tried the mirror exercise many times with no success. I am not an attractive person. I will try this exercise again. As they say in slang “you go girl with your bad self!!”

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LOL!! That would be me!!! 😁

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@rwinney

@sunnyflower What powerful, truthful words you speak. I'm still mourning my loss and I admit it. I want so bad to get to the other side of acceptance and will never stop trying. I do recognize positives however so, I know I'm on the right path. 👍🏻

I definitely look up to you 🌞🌷.Thanks for being a Connect member and bringing such a presence of strength even through your massive struggles. You are a priceless presence.

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Amen! Ditto! Keep on keeping on! 😊

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@sunnyflower

MMMmmmm, surely something to think about. I see points for doing this both ways but know it's tried and true to actually look at oneself. More difficult but the purpose is to see and treat ourselves, whom we loathe, blame , etc., differently. To extend the empathy, kindness, gentleness, love, encouragement etc., to who we are looking at in the mirror. Very hard to do but can really work!

I just don't know if changing it up will accomplish the same goal. I haven't researched this exercise therapists use, but it has great success as is.

I wouldn't ever judge you for changing it up. 😊

Best wishes, Sunny flower

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@sunnyflower
Sunny, a comment on your comment about my comment: I did say it might be worth 1 cent or less. I figure, toss out an idea and see if it sticks to anything. Just spitballing, you have actuaully done it (the mirror thing) and I was just imagining it in my mind. Don't mind me, you're welcome to take a huge grain of salt with any of MY comments, and I knew I was out on a limb with this one. Best, Hank

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@jesfactsmon

@sunnyflower
Sunny, a comment on your comment about my comment: I did say it might be worth 1 cent or less. I figure, toss out an idea and see if it sticks to anything. Just spitballing, you have actuaully done it (the mirror thing) and I was just imagining it in my mind. Don't mind me, you're welcome to take a huge grain of salt with any of MY comments, and I knew I was out on a limb with this one. Best, Hank

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No worries!

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@rwinney

@jesfactsmon My good is that I have more time to spend with my older relatives, as they age, than I would have if I was still working. That does make me happy.

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😊💗👍

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Heat and cold intolerance can also be a symptom of adrenal insufficiency or Addison's Disease, which I have. An endocrinologist who has experience with Addison's can test your adrenal gland function and prescribe adrenal hormone supplements (hydrocortisone, fludrocort, progesterone, DHEA and electrolytes) to lessen the symptoms. Treatment has helped me by reducing dizziness, brain fog, exhaustion, etc., but it has not eliminated my symptoms. Low cortisol (hydrocortisone) can cause insufficient regulation of immune response, leading to too much inflammation and possibly neuropathy.

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@margaret10

Heat and cold intolerance can also be a symptom of adrenal insufficiency or Addison's Disease, which I have. An endocrinologist who has experience with Addison's can test your adrenal gland function and prescribe adrenal hormone supplements (hydrocortisone, fludrocort, progesterone, DHEA and electrolytes) to lessen the symptoms. Treatment has helped me by reducing dizziness, brain fog, exhaustion, etc., but it has not eliminated my symptoms. Low cortisol (hydrocortisone) can cause insufficient regulation of immune response, leading to too much inflammation and possibly neuropathy.

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@margaret10 Hi Margaret, I read your earlier post that said you also have had neuropathy in your feet for 18 years. Just curious when your Addison's developed? My brother has had Addison's for about 25 years or more, not sure he knows why he got it, I have never heard him talk about that aspect. I am wondering if your Addison's might have developed from the neuropathy, any idea? Thanks, Hank

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@jesfactsmon

@margaret10 Hi Margaret, I read your earlier post that said you also have had neuropathy in your feet for 18 years. Just curious when your Addison's developed? My brother has had Addison's for about 25 years or more, not sure he knows why he got it, I have never heard him talk about that aspect. I am wondering if your Addison's might have developed from the neuropathy, any idea? Thanks, Hank

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Hi Hank,

My Addison's is a result of the surgical removal of my left adrenal gland that had a tumor (pheochromocytoma) when I was 9 years old. The tumor was caused by a mutation in my SDHB gene which I likely inherited from one of my parents. My remaining adrenal is only able to partially compensate for the missing one, resulting in decreased adrenal hormones. My Addison's was not diagnosed until age 42.

Addison's can be caused by a genetic mutation, tuberculosis, an autoimmune disease (the most common cause), etc., but I am not aware that it is caused by neuropathy. As you know, neuropathy can be caused by hundreds of different disorders. In my case, I believe it's caused by marginal cortisol deficiency resulting in an overactive immune system and resulting inflammation in my feet.

Your brother could, if he hasn't already, see an endocrinologist and ask for tests that measure his adrenal hormone levels, and if they're low, get a prescription for what he's missing. He could also get an anti-nuclear antibody test to find out if it's autoimmune. Best of luck to him.
Margaret

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@margaret10

Heat and cold intolerance can also be a symptom of adrenal insufficiency or Addison's Disease, which I have. An endocrinologist who has experience with Addison's can test your adrenal gland function and prescribe adrenal hormone supplements (hydrocortisone, fludrocort, progesterone, DHEA and electrolytes) to lessen the symptoms. Treatment has helped me by reducing dizziness, brain fog, exhaustion, etc., but it has not eliminated my symptoms. Low cortisol (hydrocortisone) can cause insufficient regulation of immune response, leading to too much inflammation and possibly neuropathy.

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Hi Margaret10, wow, I too have adrenal insufficiency. I am what they call steroid dependent, which caused it from being on steroids for so many years for my lungs and my mixed connective tissue autoimmune disease/s/inflammation. No wonder my thermostat is off!! The answer to adrenal insufficiency is steroids ironicaly. I take my daily 10mg, but have injectable for when I'm in crisis-can't take my oral due to illness or something. I hope and pray you can have some victory in your circumstances. So much going on. I get it. I wish you the comfort and peace of God through Christ which transcends all human understanding (Philippians 4:7), which is the only thing that gets me through!! Warmest regards, Sunnyflower

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@margaret10

Hi Hank,

My Addison's is a result of the surgical removal of my left adrenal gland that had a tumor (pheochromocytoma) when I was 9 years old. The tumor was caused by a mutation in my SDHB gene which I likely inherited from one of my parents. My remaining adrenal is only able to partially compensate for the missing one, resulting in decreased adrenal hormones. My Addison's was not diagnosed until age 42.

Addison's can be caused by a genetic mutation, tuberculosis, an autoimmune disease (the most common cause), etc., but I am not aware that it is caused by neuropathy. As you know, neuropathy can be caused by hundreds of different disorders. In my case, I believe it's caused by marginal cortisol deficiency resulting in an overactive immune system and resulting inflammation in my feet.

Your brother could, if he hasn't already, see an endocrinologist and ask for tests that measure his adrenal hormone levels, and if they're low, get a prescription for what he's missing. He could also get an anti-nuclear antibody test to find out if it's autoimmune. Best of luck to him.
Margaret

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@margaret10 Thank-you for the info that my brother might be able to have his levels improved by a prescription. I will pass that on to him in case he does not know. He has been under a doctor's care for years so he may already know his options. Like @sunnyflower he takes a steroid dose each morning. It's unpleasant as he usually gets a bit nauseous right after taking it and sometimes throws up, but he seems to do okay other than that. Thanks again, Hank

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@rwinney

@sunnyflower What powerful, truthful words you speak. I'm still mourning my loss and I admit it. I want so bad to get to the other side of acceptance and will never stop trying. I do recognize positives however so, I know I'm on the right path. 👍🏻

I definitely look up to you 🌞🌷.Thanks for being a Connect member and bringing such a presence of strength even through your massive struggles. You are a priceless presence.

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Hi Rachel, I can't recall responding to this beautiful message. I looked around and didn't find that I responded. Thanks so much for your kind words! They mean a lot.

I hope and pray I can be worthy of your opinion of me and that I can, with God's help, be supportive and offer hope and comfort to everyone.

By the grace of God go I, literally! Be well, Sunnyflower. @jesthefactsmon

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