Heart disease and left ear

Posted by ch665296f @ch665296f, Nov 19, 2019

I am wondering if there is any connection between heart disease and a full,somewhat numb feeling I have around my left ear radiating down my jaw? I had a series of treatments for that ear including drugs, drops, and a tube. This all started about the same time my various heart conditions surfaced. According to the ENT doctor I saw the eardrum is fine, and time will take care of the rest. However, I continue to have this sensation in that ear with compromised hearing from it. There is not a lot of pain associated with this, just extremely annoying. Both of these conditions started a year and a half ago. Could there be a connection?

Hello @ch665296f

While jaw pain can be symptomatic of a heart problem, I've not heard of ear fullness being associated with the heart. Have you been checked by a cardiologist? This might be the best way to evaluate whether the pain is associated with the heart or not.

Here is a link to some information about jaw pain and heart problems from google scholar,
https://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&as_sdt=0%2C23&q=jaw+pain+and+heart+disease&oq=jaw+
This tends to be a more common symptom in women than in men.

Have you met with a cardiologist since you began to experience this jaw pain?

Liked by lucky1038

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I have been seeing a cardiologist for over a year and a half. I have numerous conditions that are being monitored with a variety of medications. I have ventricular tachycardia, apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and some myocardial bridging. I have had about every test imaginable for these conditions including mri's, catheterizations, pulmonary tests, electrophysiology studies, etc. etc. So far, none of these tests warranted any invasive procedures. Although, some of those tests seemed pretty invasive to me. I have notified my heart failure team through my-chart, and will see them next Monday. Hopefully, I can get some answers. My reason for my question was to see if anyone else has had similar issues.

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@ch665296f

I have been seeing a cardiologist for over a year and a half. I have numerous conditions that are being monitored with a variety of medications. I have ventricular tachycardia, apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and some myocardial bridging. I have had about every test imaginable for these conditions including mri's, catheterizations, pulmonary tests, electrophysiology studies, etc. etc. So far, none of these tests warranted any invasive procedures. Although, some of those tests seemed pretty invasive to me. I have notified my heart failure team through my-chart, and will see them next Monday. Hopefully, I can get some answers. My reason for my question was to see if anyone else has had similar issues.

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Perhaps some other member will respond to your question soon, @ch665296f. I would be interested in hearing what your cardiologist has to say about this. Will you post again after you see your cardiologist next week?

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I will try. It's very possible that there is no connection at all. I may have to go back to the ENT doctor, but not sure what else he could do.

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Since my last post, I have seen my cardiologist and my ENT specialist. The urologist has now ordered a blood pressure cuff, loop recorder, and to have genetic testing done. My daughter is having similar heart thickening issues, so the genetic testing should determine if the cardiomyopathy I have is hereditary or not. I'm thinking it probably is. I expect my 9 yr. old grandson should also be tested. I'm hoping the 24 hour blood pressure cuff and the loop recorder will give all these "specialists" enough information to be a little more proactive. As for my ear problems, there is probably no connection to my heart. I still think there may be a connection. The perforated eardrum has not closed entirely since the tube was removed, so another patch will be put over it. I found out the patch is made out of cigarette paper…strange! So, that's my update to this point. The last 3 years has been one health issue after another. I guess it's to be somewhat expected when one reaches "geezerdom".

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@ch665296f

Since my last post, I have seen my cardiologist and my ENT specialist. The urologist has now ordered a blood pressure cuff, loop recorder, and to have genetic testing done. My daughter is having similar heart thickening issues, so the genetic testing should determine if the cardiomyopathy I have is hereditary or not. I'm thinking it probably is. I expect my 9 yr. old grandson should also be tested. I'm hoping the 24 hour blood pressure cuff and the loop recorder will give all these "specialists" enough information to be a little more proactive. As for my ear problems, there is probably no connection to my heart. I still think there may be a connection. The perforated eardrum has not closed entirely since the tube was removed, so another patch will be put over it. I found out the patch is made out of cigarette paper…strange! So, that's my update to this point. The last 3 years has been one health issue after another. I guess it's to be somewhat expected when one reaches "geezerdom".

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I so appreciate your update, @ch665296f. The genetic testing is a great idea. It will provide both you and your family with good information. I look forward to hearing from you as you continue on with these tests.

When will you start the 24-hour blood pressure test?

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I thought I would report on my latest tests. The genetic testing was very interesting to hear how it's done. In my case, 62 genes are tested for possible cardiomyopathy. There were only three that had some possibilities, and only one, MYL2 could be associated with genetic cardiomyopathy. However, there was not significant evidence to label it. Good news, I think?

I now have a three year partner. I was injected, that's how it's done, with a loop monitor. It's under my skin above my heart, and monitors a variety of things going on with my heart. If I have a symptom, I have a hand held clicker that I place near the implant. It records the episode, and I can then send it through the monitor on my bed stand. Also, during the night while I'm asleep the days activities regarding my heart issues are sent to my cardiologist. I could have this device for up to three years! Even though I have sent a few symptom related issues through my hand held recorder, nothing of serious significance has been noted. I'm not sure I explained this very accurately. Personally, I think this is a waste of time.

I still have not had a 24-hour blood pressure test. Not sure why.

So, on and on.

Dennis

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@ch665296f

I thought I would report on my latest tests. The genetic testing was very interesting to hear how it's done. In my case, 62 genes are tested for possible cardiomyopathy. There were only three that had some possibilities, and only one, MYL2 could be associated with genetic cardiomyopathy. However, there was not significant evidence to label it. Good news, I think?

I now have a three year partner. I was injected, that's how it's done, with a loop monitor. It's under my skin above my heart, and monitors a variety of things going on with my heart. If I have a symptom, I have a hand held clicker that I place near the implant. It records the episode, and I can then send it through the monitor on my bed stand. Also, during the night while I'm asleep the days activities regarding my heart issues are sent to my cardiologist. I could have this device for up to three years! Even though I have sent a few symptom related issues through my hand held recorder, nothing of serious significance has been noted. I'm not sure I explained this very accurately. Personally, I think this is a waste of time.

I still have not had a 24-hour blood pressure test. Not sure why.

So, on and on.

Dennis

Jump to this post

Hi @ch665296f,

An implantable loop recorder can help answer questions about your heart that other heart-monitoring devices don't provide. It allows for long-term heart rhythm monitoring, and captures information that a standard electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) or Holter monitor misses because some heart rhythm abnormalities occur infrequently. Here’s some more information:
https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/implantable-loop-recorder/pyc-20384986

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Was just at the ER with high blood pressure : symptom, pounding in my left ear. They said usually no symptoms with high BP.

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