Hearing Loss: Come introduce yourself and connect with others

Welcome to the Hearing Loss group on Mayo Clinic Connect.
This is a welcoming, safe place where you can meet people living with hearing loss, and friends and family supporters. Whether you were born deaf or hard of hearing, experienced hearing loss after birth or with aging, it helps to connect with others. Together we can learn from each other, support one another and share stories about living with hearing loss, coping with challenges and celebrating milestones.

Let’s chat. Why not start by introducing yourself? What is your hearing loss experience? Got a question, tip or story to share?

@contentandwell

@chunwa I also depend on CC when watching TV. How did you find the support groups that you mention? I would be interested in finding that type of group.
Thanks. JK

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One is the San Francisco Chapter of HLAA. The other one is at the "Hearing and Speech Center of Northern California.

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75 years old starting my third year wearing hearing aids (Rexton Trax 42) I can only wear over the ear hearing aids. Still notice the voice quality differences between using my wonderful amplified telephone without the aids and the voice quality I experience when I wear the aids, especially the quality of women's voices which are noticeably different. One of the the sounds I miss the most — being able to hear and enjoy my cats' purring. Do not know of any local support groups in my region which are known as the "Eastside" cities across Lake Washington from Seattle.

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@colleenyoung

Hi @judymartin, you will be able to post links in a few days. New members are not permitted to post links so that we can protect the community from spammers. You were clearly not trying to post spam, so please allow me to post the link for you.

Hearing Loss Association of America http://www.hearingloss.org

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@colleenyoung, thank you! I am a moderator/admin/everything on a few sites plus a few Facebook page, so I'll catch on soon. I guess there will more HLAA members & friends coming around soon. We shall see.

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@colleenyoung

Welcome new members of the Hearing Loss group!
@llotteb @auntsuz1960 @genuinekim @sharieberts @briley @aecarney @aecarney @wasfitz19 @pjg1 @tallguy39 @pamtis @cjspizz @tls978 @davekoh

We look forward to getting to know you. Why not start by introducing yourself? What brings you to the community? What is your experience with hearing loss?

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@colleenyoung Hi. I'm a 45-year-old man with congenital bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, with profound loss at high frequencies (3,000-8,000Hz). I didn't get my first hearing aid until my Senior year in college, although I first failed a hearing test in kindergarten. I'm now on my third set of digital aids (Widex) and have a streamer for my cell phone. Even with the aids, group conversations are impossible for me. My hearing loss has caused significant social isolation. I recently started attending local HLAA meetings.

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@cjspizz That's great that you are going to an HLAA chapter. Beside having a cochlear implant I founded a chapter in my city, and have immense satisfaction in helping others like you and me. What a joy to be in a group and understand everyone because of CART (captioning) and everyone being in the same boat, so to speak. I do much better now with the CI in group situations, but not always. For instance, at church coffee hour, it's almost impossible sometimes to hear and understand conversation. Sometimes, if it's important, I ask the people to join me out in the hall where it's more quiet. We will never hear perfectly (and you'd be surprised how many do not hear well since one out of five has some degree of loss), but the best way is to try to come up with a solution so we can. Most important, don't try to hide your loss. Your puzzled looks or incorrect responses will always give you away. Just curious how you ended up in this forum.

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@cjspizz

@colleenyoung Hi. I'm a 45-year-old man with congenital bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, with profound loss at high frequencies (3,000-8,000Hz). I didn't get my first hearing aid until my Senior year in college, although I first failed a hearing test in kindergarten. I'm now on my third set of digital aids (Widex) and have a streamer for my cell phone. Even with the aids, group conversations are impossible for me. My hearing loss has caused significant social isolation. I recently started attending local HLAA meetings.

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@cjspizz I agree with you, it can cause social isolation.
We went out to dinner with friends last night and that presented two problems. First, it is so difficult to eat out and keep sodium low, which I need to do, and second that it's so hard to hear. Thankfully the restaurant was not busy so it wasn't as bad as usual, and my friend wore my "Connect Clip" — a little microphone that directs a person's voice right into my hearing aids. As I said to my husband on the way to dinner though, I enjoy being social but these two problems are making it much less enjoyable.
I know my dinner had too much sodium, so I only ate half of it. Portions are always too big anyway.
JK

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@judymartin

@cjspizz That's great that you are going to an HLAA chapter. Beside having a cochlear implant I founded a chapter in my city, and have immense satisfaction in helping others like you and me. What a joy to be in a group and understand everyone because of CART (captioning) and everyone being in the same boat, so to speak. I do much better now with the CI in group situations, but not always. For instance, at church coffee hour, it's almost impossible sometimes to hear and understand conversation. Sometimes, if it's important, I ask the people to join me out in the hall where it's more quiet. We will never hear perfectly (and you'd be surprised how many do not hear well since one out of five has some degree of loss), but the best way is to try to come up with a solution so we can. Most important, don't try to hide your loss. Your puzzled looks or incorrect responses will always give you away. Just curious how you ended up in this forum.

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@judymartin I ended up in this forum because of HLAA. The HLAA Hearing Life e-News email from a few days ago explaining that "HLAA has teamed up with the Ida Institute and Mayo Clinic to offer a Hearing Loss group on Mayo Connect" with a link to join. So, here I am!

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@contentandwell Part of my problem is I don't usually enjoy being social, so there's that too.

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Hi! I’m Buffy! I just got an email to join this and I wish it existed years ago. I have always felt that I’m the only person in the world going through this because everyone around me can hear. My mom can still hear a pin drop…at 75 years old! Recently…through my cochlear journey…I have heard the stories of others that are identical to my experiences. So I’m glad to be here 🙂

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@cjspizz

@colleenyoung Hi. I'm a 45-year-old man with congenital bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, with profound loss at high frequencies (3,000-8,000Hz). I didn't get my first hearing aid until my Senior year in college, although I first failed a hearing test in kindergarten. I'm now on my third set of digital aids (Widex) and have a streamer for my cell phone. Even with the aids, group conversations are impossible for me. My hearing loss has caused significant social isolation. I recently started attending local HLAA meetings.

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@cjspizz Why don’t you get a cochlear? You’re too young to be isolated!

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@nybuffy

@cjspizz Why don’t you get a cochlear? You’re too young to be isolated!

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I thought about it, but it's not covered by my insurance, and I can't afford to pay out-of-pocket.

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@cjspizz

@contentandwell Part of my problem is I don't usually enjoy being social, so there's that too.

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@cjspizz I’m basically an introvert too. I do enjoy being social with close friends and family, bit when we go to a larger gathering I am ready to leave long before it’s over. Being social can be exhausting and being social when you have a hearing impairment makes it 10 times worse. I’m pretty much a one-on-one person.
JK

Liked by cjspizz

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BradMM… hearing aids for years now. Wife still hasn't learned how to speak to me. I teach a class for a fee that I feel that I won't be able to do if my hearing continues to get worse.

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@bradmm

BradMM… hearing aids for years now. Wife still hasn't learned how to speak to me. I teach a class for a fee that I feel that I won't be able to do if my hearing continues to get worse.

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@bradmm Isn't it funny how our spouses are the ones most unable to adapt to our hearing losses? My husband also does not know how to speak to me so I can hear and comprehend. With age his voice has gotten a bit grumbly which makes it less clear and at this point clarity is a big problem for me.
JK

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@contentandwell

@bradmm Isn't it funny how our spouses are the ones most unable to adapt to our hearing losses? My husband also does not know how to speak to me so I can hear and comprehend. With age his voice has gotten a bit grumbly which makes it less clear and at this point clarity is a big problem for me.
JK

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I was trying to remember but, based on the fact that my first audiologist told me that three years was the normal lifespan for my $5,000 hearing aids, I think I've worn them for 5-6 year since I'm on my second set. I have to keep the TV remote close to me because wifey still tries to talk to me with the TV on. That's just one example but it seems to me that, despite the background noise, I have to focus my attention on where I want to hear and it's impossible when she speaks while my attention is focused on TV. I also have found that I subconsciously read lips so I need to see the person's face which I won't be looking at if I'm looking at TV.

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