Hearing Loss: Come introduce yourself and connect with others

Welcome to the Hearing Loss group on Mayo Clinic Connect.
This is a welcoming, safe place where you can meet people living with hearing loss, and friends and family supporters. Whether you were born deaf or hard of hearing, experienced hearing loss after birth or with aging, it helps to connect with others. Together we can learn from each other, support one another and share stories about living with hearing loss, coping with challenges and celebrating milestones.

Let’s chat. Why not start by introducing yourself? What is your hearing loss experience? Got a question, tip or story to share?

Consumer Cellular costs us $35/mo. for two phone lines, both with texting. Because we live where there's no reception, we might exceed the limit of the calls and texting on our plan if we used phones every day, but the plans with more data are still very inexpensive.

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@catladyde9

@barbb. Hi — it is my 12/19 new Lenovo desktop that Zoom refuses to accept. I have standard desktop computer speakers connected to the Lenovo CPU – no camera or microphone. Zoom will not accept/recognize my speakers, preventing my accessing any Zoom presentation, even after multiple attempts. Zoom does not provide any online support nor do they respond to any email customer service requests…..

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@catladyde9 Since you don't have a camera or microphone built into your computer, you can buy these and attach them to your computer. This is not a recommendation and I have not even tried this but here's a product from Amazon: https://smile.amazon.com/Microphone-Wansview-Correction-Streaming-Conference/dp/B088D3VXC6/ref=sr_1_5?crid=KAYTFSX476ZG&dchild=1&keywords=webcam+with+microphone&qid=1595497607&sprefix=webcam%2Caps%2C172&sr=8-5
You can find similar products locally. This product has the camera and microphone in one device, which I would recommend to make installation easier. I don't know if this would solve some of the other issues that you're having with Zoom, but its a start
Tony in Michigan

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@barbb

Hi Judyca7, I am responding to your speaking of isolation and saying that you no longer can hear on the phone. Are you considering getting a Captel or Caption Call Phone? They are free and wonderful inventions. With my severe to profound loss of hearing I don't know where I'd be without the Captel phone.

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I have a Caption Call phone but I can no longer hear on that either. I rely totally on the captioning which is very often incorrect and I cannot figure out what the person speaking means. Since I have a lot of phone appointments with doctors one of my daughters comes over, talks with the doctor and I try to make out what the captioning means. Daughters are sometimes not available though and then it is a real struggle. Now I just tell the doctor the problem and that there will be pauses while I try to figure out what he/she actually said. Then I repeat back to the doctor what I think was said. So far each doctor has been quite patient. I am not tech savvy at all but there has got to be something better out there. I will research the Captel phone……. thanks for responding. Judy

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I absolutely HATE the phone, period! Although I appreciate the technological advances, I stopped my reliance on phones for communications many years ago. My family knows to contact me via e-mail or text. Thankfully, my health providers are geared toward online communications, with good results. Stay well, Everyone.

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Hi, I am 78/male about to go back for my second sit down with an audiologist who has already tested me and said that I Have moderate hearing loss in both ears and that she recommends hearing aids. I am ok with that since I am having some difficulty hearing and I have rather severe ringing in my ears. What recommendations do people have for what type of hearing aides I should consider and what questions to ask, etc. I realize that the tinnitus may not go away even with hearing aids. The ringing may be exacerbated by stress associated with the corona virus situation. I do feel stress.

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Check out the Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA) web site. They have a checklist here https://www.hearingloss.org/wp-content/uploads/HLAA_Purchasing_HearingAid_Checklist.pdf?pdf=Checklist

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@tarheel

Hi, I am 78/male about to go back for my second sit down with an audiologist who has already tested me and said that I Have moderate hearing loss in both ears and that she recommends hearing aids. I am ok with that since I am having some difficulty hearing and I have rather severe ringing in my ears. What recommendations do people have for what type of hearing aides I should consider and what questions to ask, etc. I realize that the tinnitus may not go away even with hearing aids. The ringing may be exacerbated by stress associated with the corona virus situation. I do feel stress.

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@tarheel I am in the market for new hearing aids too. I also use the HLAA checklist. But in addition to that, I use a forum from Hearing Tracker https://mail.yahoo.com/d/folders/1/messages/89705?intl=us&lang=en-US&.partner=none&.src=news as it gives a lot of input for specific brands and resources. It has been very helpful. Good luck.

Liked by maryella7

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@tarheel

Hi, I am 78/male about to go back for my second sit down with an audiologist who has already tested me and said that I Have moderate hearing loss in both ears and that she recommends hearing aids. I am ok with that since I am having some difficulty hearing and I have rather severe ringing in my ears. What recommendations do people have for what type of hearing aides I should consider and what questions to ask, etc. I realize that the tinnitus may not go away even with hearing aids. The ringing may be exacerbated by stress associated with the corona virus situation. I do feel stress.

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Hello Tarheel.

Welcome to this discussion group on Mayo Clinic Connect. You are typical, as far as hearing loss is concerned as most everyone in their 70s has some degree of hearing loss. Choosing to follow through and get hearing aids makes you 'unique'. Seriously, it's unfortunate that so many who could benefit from hearing aids, do not have them. You'll find that a well fit set of hearing aids will eliminate some of that stress you mention. I'm your age, but have been using hearing aids for many years. Long enough to know how much they have improved over the last few decades. I agree with arrowshooter on checking out the HLAA website. The organization has done outstanding work to make hearing loss an issue of concern in many ways. http://www.hearingloss.org

Further, I would suggest you not make 'invisible or small' your descriptive choice. Get a pair of hearing aids that allow you to control them. A manual volume control is a must. They should include both bluetooth technology (BT), and active telecoil technology. Insist that the provider demonstrate what a telecoil can do, and don't let her tell you that it's 'old technology'. It is technology that can connect you to many things that BT cannot connect to. You want both. (Note: A telecoil adds about $25 to the cost of a hearing aid while BT adds hundreds.) Ask her to include a neckloop with your purchase. You'll be able to connect to audio devices you use regularly. Your computer, iPhone, radio, etc. BT can also do that, but the telecoil will also connect at many public venues where you want to hear to participate. Depending on where you live, you may or may not have many venues that have installed hearing loops that connect with those telecoils. It's an ongoing project. More information at http://www.hearingloop.org Hearing loops tend to be in locations where there are hard of hearing people actively advocating for them.

There are many good brands of hearing aids, but each person's hearing loss is unique, so testing and fitting are very important. If you are fit with something you don't feel is helping you enough, ask to try something different. You are entitled to a trial period. Be sure you understand how long that trial period is so you can return the hearing aids if you need to. Use that trial time in every possible setting. Also, be sure to ask for a copy of your audiogram. That is your information. Should you want or need to go to a different provider you would already have your test results. I prefer behind the ear hearing aids because they are easier to manipulate and more comfortable to wear. They are also capable of including more of the technology options you will want to have.

Hearing aids cost way too much and are rarely covered by insurance. Consequently, it pays to do some research before you make your purchase. Good that you are doing that. With proper testing, proper fitting and your desire to hear better, that stress monster will dissipate. So will the typical fatigue hard of hearing people experience when they struggle to participate in conversation; especially in noisy social settings. Good luck to you.

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@tarheel

Hi, I am 78/male about to go back for my second sit down with an audiologist who has already tested me and said that I Have moderate hearing loss in both ears and that she recommends hearing aids. I am ok with that since I am having some difficulty hearing and I have rather severe ringing in my ears. What recommendations do people have for what type of hearing aides I should consider and what questions to ask, etc. I realize that the tinnitus may not go away even with hearing aids. The ringing may be exacerbated by stress associated with the corona virus situation. I do feel stress.

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@tarheel Take a look at the posts in the group 'What to Expect at Your Hearing Aid Fitting'. The chief thing for hearing aids is to ask for a 30 day trial, try a couple of types, work with your specialist (or audiologist) and get them adjusted for you. Widex specifically has a program for tinnitus (it's a collection of bells ringing sounds, you can turn on or off) , and I personally prefer them. Do ask for a t-coil to be included in your aid. There are lots of people in these groups with lots of experience with hearing aids. Good luck – and ask questions!

Liked by maryella7

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Hello,
Are there any cases of delayed restoration of sudden hearing loss following ear injections and oral steroid treatment? Or do most cases involve hearing restoration as treatment occurs? I completed my treatment last week, (ten days of oral steroids and four ear injections) and have seen no results yet. I lost all hearing in my right ear on July 6, and started treatment the next day. I am trying to be hopeful but I ma interested in hearing real case stories. No hearing has come back yet and today is three weeks. Thanks, Eileen

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@lucyg

@tarheel Take a look at the posts in the group 'What to Expect at Your Hearing Aid Fitting'. The chief thing for hearing aids is to ask for a 30 day trial, try a couple of types, work with your specialist (or audiologist) and get them adjusted for you. Widex specifically has a program for tinnitus (it's a collection of bells ringing sounds, you can turn on or off) , and I personally prefer them. Do ask for a t-coil to be included in your aid. There are lots of people in these groups with lots of experience with hearing aids. Good luck – and ask questions!

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thanks very much for your advice. I am needing help on hearing, but the tinnitus is really driving me crazy.

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@tarheel

thanks very much for your advice. I am needing help on hearing, but the tinnitus is really driving me crazy.

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Tar Heel: I have major issues with tinnitus also. I have reactive tinnitus which means that when I go to public places with people around my tinnitus actually gets worse. I went to a tinnitus clinic here in Wisconsin and they put me on white noise therapy to counter the tinnitus. Couple of times a day I play a river stream flowing…. very soothing! We need to train our brains to ignore the tinnitus…..because that is where it is coming from! Hope this helps!

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@scottk

Tar Heel: I have major issues with tinnitus also. I have reactive tinnitus which means that when I go to public places with people around my tinnitus actually gets worse. I went to a tinnitus clinic here in Wisconsin and they put me on white noise therapy to counter the tinnitus. Couple of times a day I play a river stream flowing…. very soothing! We need to train our brains to ignore the tinnitus…..because that is where it is coming from! Hope this helps!

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thanks, scotik, for your information about tinnitus. Mine seems to be a little less notifiable when I am engaged in something, but otherwise, it's quite loud most of the time. It seem to come out of nowhere, but I suppose its related to some hearing loss. I am suppose to get hearing aids – I will ask the audiologist about white noise therapy.

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@julieo4

Hello Tarheel.

Welcome to this discussion group on Mayo Clinic Connect. You are typical, as far as hearing loss is concerned as most everyone in their 70s has some degree of hearing loss. Choosing to follow through and get hearing aids makes you 'unique'. Seriously, it's unfortunate that so many who could benefit from hearing aids, do not have them. You'll find that a well fit set of hearing aids will eliminate some of that stress you mention. I'm your age, but have been using hearing aids for many years. Long enough to know how much they have improved over the last few decades. I agree with arrowshooter on checking out the HLAA website. The organization has done outstanding work to make hearing loss an issue of concern in many ways. http://www.hearingloss.org

Further, I would suggest you not make 'invisible or small' your descriptive choice. Get a pair of hearing aids that allow you to control them. A manual volume control is a must. They should include both bluetooth technology (BT), and active telecoil technology. Insist that the provider demonstrate what a telecoil can do, and don't let her tell you that it's 'old technology'. It is technology that can connect you to many things that BT cannot connect to. You want both. (Note: A telecoil adds about $25 to the cost of a hearing aid while BT adds hundreds.) Ask her to include a neckloop with your purchase. You'll be able to connect to audio devices you use regularly. Your computer, iPhone, radio, etc. BT can also do that, but the telecoil will also connect at many public venues where you want to hear to participate. Depending on where you live, you may or may not have many venues that have installed hearing loops that connect with those telecoils. It's an ongoing project. More information at http://www.hearingloop.org Hearing loops tend to be in locations where there are hard of hearing people actively advocating for them.

There are many good brands of hearing aids, but each person's hearing loss is unique, so testing and fitting are very important. If you are fit with something you don't feel is helping you enough, ask to try something different. You are entitled to a trial period. Be sure you understand how long that trial period is so you can return the hearing aids if you need to. Use that trial time in every possible setting. Also, be sure to ask for a copy of your audiogram. That is your information. Should you want or need to go to a different provider you would already have your test results. I prefer behind the ear hearing aids because they are easier to manipulate and more comfortable to wear. They are also capable of including more of the technology options you will want to have.

Hearing aids cost way too much and are rarely covered by insurance. Consequently, it pays to do some research before you make your purchase. Good that you are doing that. With proper testing, proper fitting and your desire to hear better, that stress monster will dissipate. So will the typical fatigue hard of hearing people experience when they struggle to participate in conversation; especially in noisy social settings. Good luck to you.

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thanks very much for your helpful response. I made a copy of it and will discuss these points with the audiologist when we meet again next week. Your response was very helpful.

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@arrowshooter

Check out the Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA) web site. They have a checklist here https://www.hearingloss.org/wp-content/uploads/HLAA_Purchasing_HearingAid_Checklist.pdf?pdf=Checklist

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thanks for sending the link for the checklist – I made a copy of it and will take it with me to the audiologist. Very helpful. Tarheel.

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