Heard something about COVID and reinfection

Posted by cindiwass @cindiwass, Jun 20 8:16pm

Listening to some doctors talk on radio and they were talking about reinfection, possibly from feces of an infected person, but saying it was unlikely. My question is — is reinfection possible? Let’s say a person who has COVID19 sneezes and the little covid particle gets in the nose, mouth, or eyes. From that same person. So the question is: is reinfection possible? Or double infection, if you know what I mean? I am figuring the person has the virus. It’s still all mysterious, imho.

@cindiwass– Hello. You are correct, it's all mysterious. There hasn't been enough time passed to determine this question. I don't know what double infection means. Unfortunately, we all have to wait, maybe years to know the truth about Coronavirus-19.

Liked by fiesty76

REPLY

@cindiwass I'll add a bit to what @merpreb had to say – Everything about Covid-19 is new and more is NOT known for sure than is known at this time. All aspects of the virus are being studied in teaching hospitals and universities worldwide, but much of what the "talking heads" (including many "experts" being interviewed) in media have to say is based on the tiniest snippets of a news release. The best way to get good information is to look for peer-reviewed research-based information. Here is one good place to start: https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/category/covid-19/

As to the news you were referring to, you may be confusing two pieces of info that have been circulating in the media this week. The first, whether one can be reinfected, is speculation based on the fact that Covid-19 is a Corona class virus, like the common cold. It is possible to become reinfected with a cold virus (perhaps a mutated version of the original one you had) so there is thought you MIGHT be able to be reinfected with Covid-19. It is being studied at the U of MN and other places now. No conclusions have been reached.

The second, about Covid-19 in feces, is based on a study of toilet flushing that showed fecal matter can "aerosolize" and float in the air when the toilet is flushed. There has been NO evidence yet of viral transmission in this manner. The solution is to close the lid before flushing to contain any droplets, which will then fall harmlessly back into the toilet. If there is no lid, don't lean over the bowl while it is flushing – push the lever and turn away.

As with all things Covid-19 related, the risk of infection is all about the combination of proximity, time, and amount of exposure. The way to limit those is distance, handwashing, and limiting time of exposure. Here is an excellent, if long, interview with a respected epidemiologist about staying safe: https://www.bluezones.com/2020/06/covid-19-straight-answers-from-top-epidemiologist-who-predicted-the-pandemic/

I hope these bits of information help ease your mind.
Sue

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On CNN there was an interview with a 37 yr old female who had covid-19 it was 3 months after now and she sounded and looked sick still ,she said she never did recover but her last test was negative ☹️ also a Dr said the virus settles on the ground ,whether farms grass or sidewalks I have always washed fruits and veggies now soles of shoes with clorax water .El Centro Can is using tents for covid-19 now

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@lioness

On CNN there was an interview with a 37 yr old female who had covid-19 it was 3 months after now and she sounded and looked sick still ,she said she never did recover but her last test was negative ☹️ also a Dr said the virus settles on the ground ,whether farms grass or sidewalks I have always washed fruits and veggies now soles of shoes with clorax water .El Centro Can is using tents for covid-19 now

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@lioness– There are a lot of speculations where COVID-19 lives. This morning there was also an article in the NYT concerning the virus and being indoors.
https://www.nytmes.com/2020/07/09/health/virus-aerosols-who.html?action=click&module=Top%20Stories&pgtype=Homepage
Linda, from the beginning there have been tons of speculations about where it lives, how long it lasts, how it's spread and it has driven us all batty. There are people who take a long time to recover and are ill for long periods of time. There are people who exhibit no symptoms but they test positive. The same safety regulations still hold true and will keep you the safest. Wash your hands often and for 20 seconds, stay away from crowds, even if you wear a mask. Keep at least 6 feet apart. I hope that you are still doing all of these things to stay safe. It's the best that we can do. Try not to pay attention to unusual cases, they will further the feeling of battiness!

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@merpreb b You are so right it's just craziness we experience now I'm staying safe doing all the right things You too stay safe

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@merpreb

@lioness– There are a lot of speculations where COVID-19 lives. This morning there was also an article in the NYT concerning the virus and being indoors.
https://www.nytmes.com/2020/07/09/health/virus-aerosols-who.html?action=click&module=Top%20Stories&pgtype=Homepage
Linda, from the beginning there have been tons of speculations about where it lives, how long it lasts, how it's spread and it has driven us all batty. There are people who take a long time to recover and are ill for long periods of time. There are people who exhibit no symptoms but they test positive. The same safety regulations still hold true and will keep you the safest. Wash your hands often and for 20 seconds, stay away from crowds, even if you wear a mask. Keep at least 6 feet apart. I hope that you are still doing all of these things to stay safe. It's the best that we can do. Try not to pay attention to unusual cases, they will further the feeling of battiness!

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@merpreb and @lioness, Really agree with what you wrote, Merry. There continues to be a great deal unknown about "all things Covid-19". Shoot, I qualified for the "batty" moniker on others counts, don't need to add more! lol

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@sueinmn

@cindiwass I'll add a bit to what @merpreb had to say – Everything about Covid-19 is new and more is NOT known for sure than is known at this time. All aspects of the virus are being studied in teaching hospitals and universities worldwide, but much of what the "talking heads" (including many "experts" being interviewed) in media have to say is based on the tiniest snippets of a news release. The best way to get good information is to look for peer-reviewed research-based information. Here is one good place to start: https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/category/covid-19/

As to the news you were referring to, you may be confusing two pieces of info that have been circulating in the media this week. The first, whether one can be reinfected, is speculation based on the fact that Covid-19 is a Corona class virus, like the common cold. It is possible to become reinfected with a cold virus (perhaps a mutated version of the original one you had) so there is thought you MIGHT be able to be reinfected with Covid-19. It is being studied at the U of MN and other places now. No conclusions have been reached.

The second, about Covid-19 in feces, is based on a study of toilet flushing that showed fecal matter can "aerosolize" and float in the air when the toilet is flushed. There has been NO evidence yet of viral transmission in this manner. The solution is to close the lid before flushing to contain any droplets, which will then fall harmlessly back into the toilet. If there is no lid, don't lean over the bowl while it is flushing – push the lever and turn away.

As with all things Covid-19 related, the risk of infection is all about the combination of proximity, time, and amount of exposure. The way to limit those is distance, handwashing, and limiting time of exposure. Here is an excellent, if long, interview with a respected epidemiologist about staying safe: https://www.bluezones.com/2020/06/covid-19-straight-answers-from-top-epidemiologist-who-predicted-the-pandemic/

I hope these bits of information help ease your mind.
Sue

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Hi, and I thank you for your information. Naturally I hope I don't get the virus but I do go out shopping from time to time. I try to stay away from people, but sometimes it is hard not to say anything when shopping, at least for me it is. I always wear a mask and am careful to keep my hands away from my face when I'm out. I agree about the aerosolized matter from toilet flushing. I am not particularly afraid, but I am cautious. We do have a health aide that comes to our house 2x a week to help my husband, she appears to be ok, but doesn't wear a mask and I'm not pushing it. She is supposed to take her temperature every day, but who knows? I am not testing her, I'm glad to have her, she's a terrific aide, but like I say, every time I think I have a sore throat I hope it's not the CV19. She is employed by a hospital system around here. Now there is something on the news about a teacher in Arizona who got infected and she took all the precautionary measures. She did, however, have diabetes, and asthma. I think we're going to be wearing masks for a long time.

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@lioness

On CNN there was an interview with a 37 yr old female who had covid-19 it was 3 months after now and she sounded and looked sick still ,she said she never did recover but her last test was negative ☹️ also a Dr said the virus settles on the ground ,whether farms grass or sidewalks I have always washed fruits and veggies now soles of shoes with clorax water .El Centro Can is using tents for covid-19 now

Jump to this post

Yes, I agree, it's all very confusing. So some of us do the best we can by social distancing, if possible, hand washing, not touching our faces, eyes, mouth, nose, especially when out. And I wear a mask. Oh, and I am very wary of going to the dental clinic to get implants now, although I'm pretty sure they will take good precautions. Still nervous though.

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@cindiwass, Hi, Cindy, I'm calling my dentist today for a troublesome tooth problem that I kept hoping would go away..fat chance! vbg I agree with what you and others have written about taking precautions and am doing the same. I am especially nervous about a visit to my dentist although I know she will have taken all sorts of precautions that probably exceed even recommendations for dentists. I'll report back on this visit but just want you to know you are not alone in feeling wary of dental appointments especially.

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@cindiwass

Yes, I agree, it's all very confusing. So some of us do the best we can by social distancing, if possible, hand washing, not touching our faces, eyes, mouth, nose, especially when out. And I wear a mask. Oh, and I am very wary of going to the dental clinic to get implants now, although I'm pretty sure they will take good precautions. Still nervous though.

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@merpreb We live now in a new world yes I too have to see a dentist but leary about there precautions

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@fiesty76

@cindiwass, Hi, Cindy, I'm calling my dentist today for a troublesome tooth problem that I kept hoping would go away..fat chance! vbg I agree with what you and others have written about taking precautions and am doing the same. I am especially nervous about a visit to my dentist although I know she will have taken all sorts of precautions that probably exceed even recommendations for dentists. I'll report back on this visit but just want you to know you are not alone in feeling wary of dental appointments especially.

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Hi, fiesty76. Some things just must be done. I feel pretty sure your dentist will take all necessary precautions. I was in the process of working towards implants, but under the present circumstances, it is not absolutely essential that I have a beautiful smile now. Although I'd love to. But some things can wait. And others cannot. I am pretty sure as well that your dentist does not want to contract the virus either.
P.S. I'm sorry I ever had the first tooth pulled rather than get a root canal, but I had a really dumb dentist, little did I know. That started the whole thing with the mouth.

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@lioness

@merpreb We live now in a new world yes I too have to see a dentist but leary about there precautions

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Certainly understandable. If I don't have to go to the doctor, I won't. If I do, I will. It is confusing, because we do the best we can. Every time I go out, then I go back to the car, and inadvertently may touch my face or eye, I think, uh oh, I hope I didn't get the virus.

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@cindiwass

Hi, fiesty76. Some things just must be done. I feel pretty sure your dentist will take all necessary precautions. I was in the process of working towards implants, but under the present circumstances, it is not absolutely essential that I have a beautiful smile now. Although I'd love to. But some things can wait. And others cannot. I am pretty sure as well that your dentist does not want to contract the virus either.
P.S. I'm sorry I ever had the first tooth pulled rather than get a root canal, but I had a really dumb dentist, little did I know. That started the whole thing with the mouth.

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@fiesty76.. I'm in the same boat with you. I need to go to the dentist to take care of some gum problem and have a cleaning. My son in law's dentist has postponed all appointments to August. I read somewhere about dental appointments but I can't find it. It said dental hygienist no longer polish your teeth because of droplets. I'm sure my dentist office will take all precautionary measures but I'm still a little worried. What if the previous patient is sick and the virus is in the air. How can I protect myself? If I do go in the future, I'll want the first appointment of the day. I'm glad I had my cleaning in February, I usually go every 4 months. Oh well, ce la vie!

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@cindiwass

Certainly understandable. If I don't have to go to the doctor, I won't. If I do, I will. It is confusing, because we do the best we can. Every time I go out, then I go back to the car, and inadvertently may touch my face or eye, I think, uh oh, I hope I didn't get the virus.

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@cindiwass I think current research, once published about length of time of exposure + quantity of virus required, will begin to set our minds at ease a bit. Dr Michael Osterholm, a respected epidemiologist, has convened a task force of varied experts to compile & review all the data on aerosol transmission – they expect to have preliminary conclusions within 30 days.

That said, based on what we already know, a single touch of the face pretty surely won't transfer enough viable virus particles to infect you. And remember – virus particles are like barnacles, not flies – they stay where they land, and cannot move on their own. So if they are on your face, the only way to get into you mouth or nose is if you put them there by putting fingers in eye, nose or mouth. What I do is open the car door, use hand sanitizer before I get in the car, remove my mask, and sanitize again after I remove it – that way I avoid putting any virus from hands onto steering wheel, controls, etc.

For those of you wearing gloves – PROPERLY remove and discard gloves before getting in the car – otherwise all the contamination on the gloves comes along with you.
See:
https://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/pdf/poster-how-to-remove-gloves.pdf
They are meant for single use and disposal, not to be taken on & off. If you cannot do this, you are better off without gloves and using handwashing/hand sanitizer. If you put on gloves when you leave home, go on your errands without removing, and take them off when you get home, you are carrying virus from place to place, into your car, and back home again.

Remember that the main vector of infection is inhalation, so caution about going to the dentist is reasonable because we sit with mask off and mouth open. However, before reopening, our dental office improved their ventilation, and are taking the added precaution of alternating room use, so they don't have two patients back-to-back in the came cubicle. So I do feel safe going (first morning appt.)

Please folks, don't put off necessary lab work and doctor's appointments for chronic conditions based on fear, otherwise the long-term effects of this pandemic will be even worse! Use video appointments when possible, early-morning lab visits for safety, wear your mask & wash your hands.
Stay calm, stay safe.
Sue

Liked by migizii, marjou

REPLY
@sueinmn

@cindiwass I think current research, once published about length of time of exposure + quantity of virus required, will begin to set our minds at ease a bit. Dr Michael Osterholm, a respected epidemiologist, has convened a task force of varied experts to compile & review all the data on aerosol transmission – they expect to have preliminary conclusions within 30 days.

That said, based on what we already know, a single touch of the face pretty surely won't transfer enough viable virus particles to infect you. And remember – virus particles are like barnacles, not flies – they stay where they land, and cannot move on their own. So if they are on your face, the only way to get into you mouth or nose is if you put them there by putting fingers in eye, nose or mouth. What I do is open the car door, use hand sanitizer before I get in the car, remove my mask, and sanitize again after I remove it – that way I avoid putting any virus from hands onto steering wheel, controls, etc.

For those of you wearing gloves – PROPERLY remove and discard gloves before getting in the car – otherwise all the contamination on the gloves comes along with you.
See:
https://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/pdf/poster-how-to-remove-gloves.pdf
They are meant for single use and disposal, not to be taken on & off. If you cannot do this, you are better off without gloves and using handwashing/hand sanitizer. If you put on gloves when you leave home, go on your errands without removing, and take them off when you get home, you are carrying virus from place to place, into your car, and back home again.

Remember that the main vector of infection is inhalation, so caution about going to the dentist is reasonable because we sit with mask off and mouth open. However, before reopening, our dental office improved their ventilation, and are taking the added precaution of alternating room use, so they don't have two patients back-to-back in the came cubicle. So I do feel safe going (first morning appt.)

Please folks, don't put off necessary lab work and doctor's appointments for chronic conditions based on fear, otherwise the long-term effects of this pandemic will be even worse! Use video appointments when possible, early-morning lab visits for safety, wear your mask & wash your hands.
Stay calm, stay safe.
Sue

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@sueinmn, I appreciated your post, Sue. Hadn't realized that "virus particles are like barnacles, not flies". That information helps!

I do as you with wearing/removing gloves and also wear a "fanny pak" fastened around waist vs taking a purse. It holds my phone, d.l., credit card, Triple A card, Kleenex, eyeglass case and ballpoint if needed for signing receipts. For the first time today, I put a tissue over nose before adding the mask and eyeglasses. The Kleenex did reduce glasses fogging.

Looking for specific brands among so many products was tedious so today's trip from inside store to car was two hours. That will have to do for my "walk" today because of heat.

There were few shoppers at my 3rd 6am Walmart trip today and my focus was buying back-ups of non-food stuffs that I use daily/frequently. Was surprised that there were only two very small bottles of rubbing alcohol on the shelf but large bottles of hydrogen peroxide. Happy to have brought home most products on the list. They may do some "airing" out of bags as they sit on tables in the garage for a few days before being brought inside.

I was able to leave a list of supplements and other products that I buy at Walgreens to be picked up later. It is so nice to be able to use their drive-up window and because of the high heat here, I asked if it would be ok for me to come tomorrow morning when it is cooler for the pick-up and the clerk said that would be fine. We have one Walgreens location that stays open 24/7 but none make deliveries.

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