Has anyone had sharp thigh pain after hip replacement

Posted by Cjropes @Cjropes, Dec 30, 2015

Has anyone had sharp thigh pain after hip replacement

@debbraw

Hi @binblessed – I am so glad to hear your good news. That was a nice message to wake up to! Glad your recovery is going well. I've had TKRs but not hip replacements. Do they prescribe physical therapy?

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Yes but because of some type of disconnect mine hasn't started yet. I am doing what I can based on what they gave me when I had it done before I also need speech therapy so I have been calling to light a fire but yes I will have home health.

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@tross68

Thank you so much for this reply! I am feeling a little better but still having hip pain (around the new hip) and it goes down the inside or outside or front of my thigh…whichever it feels like that day. I completely understand what you mean about the "ball" you were sitting on. After my surgery I felt like I was sitting on a board. Like I had one in my back pocket. Kind of in a curved shape. This is very interesting and I am glad you found the help you need. I hope it works out very well for you!

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I wanted to give you an update. I have NO thigh pain. I no longer feel weird when I sit.vi have no real hop pain (except I fell yesterday!) Dr Hedley and his team have been amazing! He showed me my b4 and after! The original prosthesis looked like it was leaning into the pelvis at an angle. His is straight and it feels so good. I honestly had no idea how much pain i was in for the 2 years after I had my first surgery. He also said he would never do a surgery like mine on anyone. Hmmm? The doc told my husband I was 2 sick for a full hip. But after reading more about it. When a partial is done now it is not tried and true. There seems to always be a need for a full revision. So maybe they didnt care becuz I an older or something..I was really sick back then. The office that did my original surgery dont seem like the docs are bad. Maybe not as up to date as they shud be. The office staff was rude! I left them and let them know it. I even documented it in my chart online. The advocate started telling me not to yell on the phone when I wasnt. I think this was becuz of my age making it my fault. I thought about sending them a dischg letter but they beat me to it. Whatever, just dont go to core institute I felt so devalued. Been in this field my entire career! It's going to crap! So pay attention to your own care oeople!!

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@binblessed

I wanted to give you an update. I have NO thigh pain. I no longer feel weird when I sit.vi have no real hop pain (except I fell yesterday!) Dr Hedley and his team have been amazing! He showed me my b4 and after! The original prosthesis looked like it was leaning into the pelvis at an angle. His is straight and it feels so good. I honestly had no idea how much pain i was in for the 2 years after I had my first surgery. He also said he would never do a surgery like mine on anyone. Hmmm? The doc told my husband I was 2 sick for a full hip. But after reading more about it. When a partial is done now it is not tried and true. There seems to always be a need for a full revision. So maybe they didnt care becuz I an older or something..I was really sick back then. The office that did my original surgery dont seem like the docs are bad. Maybe not as up to date as they shud be. The office staff was rude! I left them and let them know it. I even documented it in my chart online. The advocate started telling me not to yell on the phone when I wasnt. I think this was becuz of my age making it my fault. I thought about sending them a dischg letter but they beat me to it. Whatever, just dont go to core institute I felt so devalued. Been in this field my entire career! It's going to crap! So pay attention to your own care oeople!!

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@binblessed – I am so glad to hear about how well your recovery is going. I LOVED your statement about NO thigh pain. Just curious, are you still doing PT or is all that over?

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I have experienced the same stabbing pain in the thigh approx. at location of the femoral implant base (end). The orthos have concluded that a revision is not warranted as it would a) be a big deal clam-shell tthing and b) wouldn't make an improvement. So I tried PT, etc. etc. injections, whatever – no change. It really seems to be positional, and is definitely influenced by any loads I may be carrying. Walking is no fun. It feels like the pain is under the band around the lower third of the thigh. Ranges from stabbing to dull ache to ouch to whatever. Compounded with cramps.

All in all the THR seems like it was a really bad idea, Did not expect this outcome at all.

SO much fun!

THR was > 5 years ago.
Right side, posterior
Age 64
Stryker Accolade implant

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@armplinker

I have experienced the same stabbing pain in the thigh approx. at location of the femoral implant base (end). The orthos have concluded that a revision is not warranted as it would a) be a big deal clam-shell tthing and b) wouldn't make an improvement. So I tried PT, etc. etc. injections, whatever – no change. It really seems to be positional, and is definitely influenced by any loads I may be carrying. Walking is no fun. It feels like the pain is under the band around the lower third of the thigh. Ranges from stabbing to dull ache to ouch to whatever. Compounded with cramps.

All in all the THR seems like it was a really bad idea, Did not expect this outcome at all.

SO much fun!

THR was > 5 years ago.
Right side, posterior
Age 64
Stryker Accolade implant

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Hi @armplinker – Welcome to Connect. I have not had a hip replaced – just both knees, but there are lots of people here who have experience with that. I am so sorry to hear about the stabbing pain you are having. I'm sure it affects everything you do. Have you had the same level of pain for all 5 years or has it gotten worse?

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Yes, I get a sharp, stabbing pain on the outside of my thigh. Had a total hip replacement in April 19. Sometimes it's so sever I can't put any weight on my leg at all. Surgeon just says I'm overdoing it and it will go away if I take it easy but I'm not convinced.

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@julmz1

Yes I have the sharp pain in my left thigh that you are talking about. I too wished I knew what it was. It is unclear. I am coming up to 1 year on my left hip replacement in July. I just had my right hip replaced in May 2018. My left hip pain started right away. I just thought it was normal but I know it is not because my right hip has no pain what's so ever. The pain I feel is a jolt or a shock in my left thigh daily. If anyone knows what it is please tell me, because I want to know what I can do on my end to fix it. It is so annoying. I had both of my hips replaced at Mayo in Rochester,MN. I have Dr Robert Trousdale as my surgeon.He had done previous surgeries on my hips called PAO'S- Peri aceatabular Osteotomy. Not sure if that is the right spelling. In my eyes he is the best. I hope someone can give me some answers. Thanks

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Same with me. Surgeon says take it easy and it will go away but I think it's more than that.

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BbCobalt Toxicity from Hip Replacement: Symptoms and Treatment
The hip is a ball-and-socket joint. In traditional hip replacement, the artificial “ball” is made of metallic material and the “socket” is made of plastic. However, a number of years ago, manufacturers began producing and marketing metal sockets to go with the metal balls in an effort to increase joint durability. These prosthetic joints are called “metal-on-metal” hip implants. In recent years, these all-metal replacement hips have been linked to a number of serious complications, including cobalt toxicity.

Cobalt in Metal-on-Metal Replacement Hips

Cobalt is a particularly hard metal, and is one of the metals used in the manufacture of artificial hip joint components. Cobalt is also a key building block of vitamin B-12, so a small amount of cobalt in the human body is essential to good health. However, too much cobalt in the body can have severe negative health consequences.

Cobalt toxicity from hip replacement surgery involving metal-on-metal implants is becoming increasingly common. In metal-on-metal hip implants, the metal ball and metal socket slide against each other during walking, running, and other physical activities. The resulting friction can cause tiny metal particles called “ions” to wear off and enter the body. These cobalt ions can cause painful and dangerous reactions in the body.

Sometimes cobalt ions remain close to the hip, and only cause damage to tissues or bone surrounding the implant. In other cases, ions enter the bloodstream and are carried to other parts of the body. This can cause serious health problems, including kidney failure, thyroid disorders, heart disease, and perhaps even cancer. This condition is called “arthroprosthetic cobaltism.”

Symptoms of Cobalt Toxicity from Hip Replacement

Localized symptoms include:

Persistent or worsening hip or groin pain
Severe inflammation or swelling
Evidence of tissue death
Evidence of bone loss
Asymptomatic masses
Non-localized symptoms include:

Fatigue
Nausea
Vertigo
Tinnitus (“ringing” or “buzzing” in the ears)
Visual impairment
Headaches
Anxiety and irritability
Rashes
Diagnosis and Treatment for Cobalt Toxicity

Blood tests can identify the levels of cobalt in a person’s system. If testing reveals dangerously elevated levels, the first line of treatment is usually to remove the metallic implant. In patients with normal kidney function, cobalt levels will rapidly decrease following removal of the metal hip. In some instances, all symptoms will eventually resolve. However, sometimes the damage caused by cobalt toxicity does not resolve simply because the implant is removed.

Treatment following removal of the artificial joint will depend upon the medical issues caused by the cobalt poisoning. The longer the person was exposed to elevated cobalt levels in his or her system, the worse the prognosis. Unfortunately, in some cases patients never fully recover and may require ongoing medical monitoring and treatment for the remainder of their lives.

Reducing the Risk of Cobalt Toxicity

A person with a metal-on-metal hip implant who is experiencing any possible symptom of cobalt toxicity should immediately seek medical attention. The sooner the condition is diagnosed and treated the better. Persons at heightened risk for cobalt toxicity are those with kidney disease and compromised immune systems.

Even if a person with a metal-on-metal implant is not having cobalt toxicity symptoms, it does not mean a potential problem is not looming. It can take years for cobalt toxicity to produce symptoms. Some doctors advocate that all patients with metal-on-metal hip implants have their blood-cobalt levels tested at least once per year to monitor for rising levels.

Pending Lawsuits

Cobalt toxicity from hip replacement is just one of many problems associated with metal-on-metal hip implants. As a result of these issues, a number of manufacturers have issued implant recalls, and thousands of product liability lawsuits have been filed on behalf of injured patients.

Manufacturers have a duty to ensure that all products introduced into the market are as safe as possible. A manufacturer may be liable in a product liability case simply upon a showing that the product was unreasonably dangerous; even if the manufacturer was unaware of the danger.

A person who develops cobalt toxicity from hip replacement surgery may have a case against the manufacturer. The patient shouldn’t delay in having his or her case evaluated by an attorney because a law called the statute of limitations restricts the time to bring a lawsuit against a manufacturer.

SYMPTOMS OF METAL HIP FAILURE

Hip Replacement Clicking and Popping: What it Means and What to Do Next
Hip Replacement Pain: What it Means and What to Do Next
Hip Replacement Swelling: What it Means and What to Do Next
Total Hip Replacement FAQs
Hip Replacement Prosthesis Types: Get to Know Your Artificial Hip
After Your Hip Replacement: What You Need to Know

LARGE METAL HIP RECALLS

Depuy Hip Recall
Johnson & Johnson Hip Recall
Stryker Hip Recall
Profemur Hip Recall
Zimmer Hip Recall
FREE ATTORNEY EVALUATION

Speaking with a specialist attorney can provide invaluable legal information about the merits of your case and amount of expected recovery. Fill out one of the contact forms to the right for a Free Metal Hip Product Liability Case Evaluation.

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@mimi1957

I had both hips replaced in 2014, and I have pain in my thighs all of the time. The more that I am on my feet the worse the pain. I am only 60 and I just got tired of going to the doctor and them telling me that nothing is wrong and it is probably just my back causing it. The problem is they don't listen to their patients and just want to continue doing test after test. I just deal with it. I live on a farm and I am so frustrated that I can't do anything that I love to do any more. But I keep hanging in there.

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I have similar history to yours… both hips replaced Jan 2017. I was 66 at the time and about 8 weeks post surgery began to have sharp thigh pain in left leg… 2 weeks later same kind of pain in right leg. one year 9 most later i am still having sharp pain in both legs, consistent but intermittent sometimes debilitating, always, every day painful to a degree. I've had every test i can think of with no conclusion. Diagnosed with mild osteoporosis of the lower spine. (not a painful condition) dr prescribing heavy duty drug for it – Forteo – i am skeptical but fairly desperate…hard to decide….. leaning towards trying it…. scared of side effects that may worsen situation… Right now i am able to push forward regardless of leg pain… extreme fatigue, flu like symptoms and headaches could make it impossible to have any type of reasonable life… keep hanging in there….

Liked by katrine

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@nancefinn

I have similar history to yours… both hips replaced Jan 2017. I was 66 at the time and about 8 weeks post surgery began to have sharp thigh pain in left leg… 2 weeks later same kind of pain in right leg. one year 9 most later i am still having sharp pain in both legs, consistent but intermittent sometimes debilitating, always, every day painful to a degree. I've had every test i can think of with no conclusion. Diagnosed with mild osteoporosis of the lower spine. (not a painful condition) dr prescribing heavy duty drug for it – Forteo – i am skeptical but fairly desperate…hard to decide….. leaning towards trying it…. scared of side effects that may worsen situation… Right now i am able to push forward regardless of leg pain… extreme fatigue, flu like symptoms and headaches could make it impossible to have any type of reasonable life… keep hanging in there….

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Thanks for your reply Nance. Sorry to hear that you've had this ongoing pain for so long. It's ridiculous that no one seems to have the answer for it. I've read some articles on stem tip pain and I think this has something to do with it. Otherwise it's just grin and bear it. I'm supposed to get my other hip done but I don't think that's going to happen any time soon. X

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@binblessed

I have had the same thing and so have many others. Same exact process bloodwork scans xrays even a hip aspiration nothing. All good. To compound the problem in trying to seek for an answer the clinic I was going to really had staff problems and I unfortunately have worked in this field my whole working life starting in nursing.. the care was very concerning for my own urgency and bone health I decided not to go back. I have sought out another physician that has a great deal of knowledge about the prosthesis. I fear I may have to have a revision. They make one with more stem end flexibility. Sometimes the prosthesis is not a good fit and you get 'end of stem pain in the thigh. I had to look all of this up myself. The other poss problem is that because the prosthesis will absorb the impact of walking etc. Your own bones do not continue to regenerate they call it 'stress shielding'. At any rate I have an appt next week let you know how I feel after that. My thigh pain comes and goes. Today I can walk. Tomorrow? Who knows. Walking sitting standing weight bearing on that leg will put me back in bed.the only comfortable place. Even sitting in the recliner or on the couch for 15 min will illicit pain when I get up. I worked really hard after being sick not just w my hip to get healthy and active again. I have lost weight new meal plan on keto anti inflammatory diet. But now I cant work out I have tried after pt in off and home. So bummed…have hope I will check back after next wk. My surgery was July 2017. I have always experienced this pain intermittently and told my doc. I also have severe groin pain when it kicks up….I am in tears sometimes when it cramps up. Hang in there folks. Pain is not normal and we arent all crazy. There has to be an answer and a solution.

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Hi, I've read about the stem pain but can't find any information as to whether it can resolve in time or does it need further surgery.

Liked by katrine

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I sympathize with all the people who have posted here. I have had horrible thigh pain ever since my hip replacement in August 2017, two years ago. At first, my original surgeon did not acknowledge this, he said it’s just bursitis. I knew it was more than that. I found a second surgeon who confirmed what I suspected from my reading that I have “end of stem” pain. Since I don’t have the strongest bones, I’m a rather thin 69 year old in otherwise good health, I took Fosamax for a few months. The problem with these titanium stems is that they are not an exact match in terms of stiffness and rigidity with human bone, so that’s where things can go wrong and cause a lot of pain that limits you. I didn’t want to take Fosamax because of potential side effects but I did anyway. It may have helped a bit. My X rays still don’t look any better, the stem is still “touching the cortex” whatever that means and it irritates the bone causing pain. It used to be a terrible stabbing pain with every step. Now it’s a duller pain with every step and less limiting but it’s still pretty bad. Sometimes things get better with time, around two years which is where I am. If time does not help enough, a revision is called for. I really want to avoid that. Tomorrow I will have a triple phase bone scan to rule out loosening of the hip implant or infection. Revision can be two different situations: one you replace everything, joint plus a different stem, one that suits weaker bone better. (Why wasn’t this done originally I wonder?!) The other is replace the stem and attach it to the bone securely using cadaver “strut grafting” to keep the implant stable enough not to irritate and cause pain. Revision surgeries are more complex than hip replacements, take longer to do as you have to undo what was done, and I so want to avoid this. So, I’ll have to decide if the risks are worth it after I get the results of the bone scan. I’m also hoping to make an appointment at the Mayo Clinic orthopedics after this scan is done. I’m giving my body more than the two years I read about since everyone is different and some people heal slower. I’m hoping I’m one of those people. I hope this helps some of you with this debilitating outcome for a surgery you hoped would take away your pain, it give you even more pain. It’s awful. I have also worked hard to walk daily and not give up. Morally it’s quite disheartening though as many of you know.

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@armplinker

I have experienced the same stabbing pain in the thigh approx. at location of the femoral implant base (end). The orthos have concluded that a revision is not warranted as it would a) be a big deal clam-shell tthing and b) wouldn't make an improvement. So I tried PT, etc. etc. injections, whatever – no change. It really seems to be positional, and is definitely influenced by any loads I may be carrying. Walking is no fun. It feels like the pain is under the band around the lower third of the thigh. Ranges from stabbing to dull ache to ouch to whatever. Compounded with cramps.

All in all the THR seems like it was a really bad idea, Did not expect this outcome at all.

SO much fun!

THR was > 5 years ago.
Right side, posterior
Age 64
Stryker Accolade implant

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I am so sorry for your disappointing outcome. After 5 years too! That’s a long time to suffer. Have you sought another opinion on a revision surgery?
It’s no fun alright and so far from what I expected too. I posted a long response below, maybe it’s too much info for members to digest.

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@hippie

Hi, I've read about the stem pain but can't find any information as to whether it can resolve in time or does it need further surgery.

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@hippie @binblessed @nancefinn. I posted a longer reply about my experience with a poor outcome and thigh pain. . Sorry if it was too long! I should try to keep it concise. I hope some of the info was helpful in some way.

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@Cjropes

I had both done. The one im having issue with was 3 yrs ago, the pain stated a year later during winter. I have been back countless time and had so many test done with no conclusive answers..to say im fustrated is an understatement. The pain is so sharp i scream out. Wondering if the mayo could fiqure this out because my ortho just keeps racking up the bills with no answers

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Well I was just advised that the sharp pain is due to subsidence of the appliance, which basically means it is falling into the femoral stem, both shortening my leg and generating the stabbing pain chronically. The top of Accolade hip is wedge-shaped which is supposed to not allow this descent, but in this case, the wedge is forcing the top of the femoral remnant apart and may lead to catastrophic splitting. So, the solution is yank it out and replace with larger appliance, both to stop the descent and to restore correct leg length. Not the news I hoped for but I had my suspicions. No amount of PT or back stretches or spinal injections or any of that makes any difference. Gravity is winning.

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