AFib questions

Posted by peggyd @peggyd, Mar 23, 2016

Good morning! I’m almost 66 years old, with infrequent AFib and on Eliquis. Sunday evening I had a spectacular nosebleed and went to the ER, where the attending physician inserted an epistaxis nasal pack (the kind with the inflatable balloon). I’m getting it removed tomorrow. What can I expect when it comes out–besides my own reaction of dancing gleefully around the office? Blood? Clots? Scabs? A genie? Thanks for your help!

@texas7777

I’m 42 years old in great shape (not running shape, but overall); 2 young boys, active, etc.. Recently diagnosed with Premature Ventricular Contractions (PVC), thus still learning about it. Had 7,500 PVC’s in 24 hours. Now trying to decide between meds or catheter ablation (burn or freeze). I’ve probably had it for awhile, but symptoms (light headed, shortness of breath, tired, short-term memory loss at times, etc.) have gotten worse over the past 6 months. I stopped alcohol, caffeine, and trying to reduce stress. Seems to help, but something will have to be done.

I have an appointment with an electrophysiologist in a couple of weeks, but may fly out to MN or FL to Mayo.
Any advice/suggestions appreciated. I’ve read through many comments on Afib (couldn’t find much on ventrical issues) meds, the ablation procedure, etc., but that just made things more confusing.

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Hi Texas777
On this webpage you’ll find the contact information for all 3 Mayo Clinic campuses http://mayocl.in/1mtmR63

@cynaburst @predictable @lynnkay1956 and others can share their Mayo experinces with you.

You can also read more discussions in Visiting Mayo Clinic group https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/traveling-to-mayo-clinic-minnesota/

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I wanted to find if anyone had Watchman implant done. If so, what are your thoughts about the procedure and how it affects you personally.

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Hi @frank4848. I moved your question over to an existing thread “AFib questions.” Here you’ll find several members who are discussing various conditions, procedures, recoveries, etc. Specifically, I’d like to introduce you to @cynaburst, @HeartPatches, @predictable and @mlemieux, who are all active mentors in the Heart & Blood group.

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My cardiologist tells me not all clots are stopped with blood thinners. He suggested the mini Maze procedure.

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@patinhou

My cardiologist tells me not all clots are stopped with blood thinners. He suggested the mini Maze procedure.

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Welcome to Mayo Connect @patinhou. Thanks for adding the mini-Maze procedure to our conversation. Are we talking about two different problems — clots and a-fib cures? Coumadin and similar blood “thinners” prevent clots from forming in the heart, but they don’t cure a-fib. The mini-Maze procedure does; it is a surgical procedure that stops heart tissue from issuing the spurious electrical impulses to the atrium (upper chamber). Through small incisions, the surgeon cuts heart tissue slightly, causing scars that block the faulty beats. The cuts are called “ablations.”

There are other ablations as well — heat, cold, radio energy, for example — that are administered by catheter through a blood vessel. They too stop the faulty beats most of the time. Here are some links to more info; view them in this order:
http://www.stopafib.org/maze-surgery.cfm
http://www.stopafib.org/mini-maze.cfm
The choice of ablation in general — and the type of ablation — must be tailored to the individual patient. Thus, mini-Maze is not always appropriate. @patinhou, would you favor us with some of the points your cardiologist made in recommending mini-Maze for you? Do you think ablation is essential or elective for you? And why mini-Maze is better than other ablations? Thanks for anything you can add to help other members who are interested.

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@patinhou

My cardiologist tells me not all clots are stopped with blood thinners. He suggested the mini Maze procedure.

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I saw Dr Wolf here in Houston.  He does the mini Maze procedure.  We have not decided absolutely that I am a candidate for this procedure.  However, I really don’t want to take blood thinners,  and I have a past history of thrombi shower.  I know this procedure is not for everyone,  but the lecture I went to made me realize there are options.  I have paroxysmal a fib.  I get fast, pounding heart rate with it, but recently found out I also have silent episodes.

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@patinhou

My cardiologist tells me not all clots are stopped with blood thinners. He suggested the mini Maze procedure.

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Patricia, thanks for your candid offering of information on your circumstances. We all can understand how important your decisions are at this crucial time, and we hope you can sense our concern for your efforts to bring your a-fib under control. I usually suggest that a person get a second opinion from the best health care professional they can find. Your relationship with Dr. Wolf clearly has equipped you with very sophisticated information and moved you toward making vital decisions. As you know, paroxysmal a-fib, being unpredictable, heightens the need for a highly expert medical team with a lot of experience in dealing with variants in symptoms and functions. Do you feel that you’re about ready to decide on your series of steps in treatment?

Most of us here are not so well-informed as you on your challenges, so for our benefit, I’d like to insert a link to a general article on a-fib to make it more convenient for us to understand better what you’re dealing with:
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/atrial-fibrillation/diagnosis-treatment/mayo-clinic-experience-patient-stories/orc-20164957.
We’d like to stay in touch with you to learn from your experience, but more to cheer you on and offer our support as you move forward. Please keep us posted and tell us if you need anything that we can provide.

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@audree

Did your cardiologist explain the cardioversion procedure? I was an emergency Afib patient on July 24, 2015 and was cared for by an emergency doctor. He had me on cardizem 360 and lasix 160 and coumadin. I was miserable with hugely swollen legs (plus 3) and still in Afib. That doctor told me to go through the scheduled hip replacement surgery in Afib and then get a cardioversion later. When I saw my own cardiologist one month later (August 27th) in a different hospital and city he told me no surgeon would perform on a patient in Afib and I’d have the cardioversion immediately (September 11, 2015.) It was successful, heart back in rhythm, and I then had surgery October 19, 2015. I was 86 years old then and did not flip back into Afib during the surgery. You may want to ask your cardiologist if you are a candidate for cardioversion. If not, why not?

I got off the coumadin after 10 months because it was not compatible with my food requirements and I now take Pradaxa since May 10, 2016. Pradaxa has an excellent antidote and I have seen no side effects from taking it except it costs much more than coumadin. Report is that they are backing off of coumadin now because it can take up to 72 hours to stop bleeding. Much too long for safety.

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I had a Cardioversion a week ago and am in normal sinus rhythm now .i still take Elequis 5 mg 2 x d Diltiazem 180 2 x dand Flecainide 100 2 x d .All these make me very tired !

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@grandmajan

I’m ok. Sorry to upset. I was looking for answers. If the pain returns I’ll get help. I see the dr on Mon and will get more of my questions answered. I’m not sure that the Cardio-version is right for me. I used to drive mental health clients to appointments for shock therapy for bipolar and depression. Sounds similar. I will also start checking my mail everyday. Thank you for being concerned. Jan

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Cardioversion is a great first step ! It is easy and could just work !Had one last week and am quite pleased .

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@frank4848

I wanted to find if anyone had Watchman implant done. If so, what are your thoughts about the procedure and how it affects you personally.

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Hi all, @frank4848 asks about the WATCHMAN implant (Left Atrial Appendage Closure Device). It was FDA approved in March 2015 as an alternative to long-term warfarin therapy http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/ProductsandMedicalProcedures/DeviceApprovalsandClearances/Recently-ApprovedDevices/ucm440621.htm

Anyone had it done?

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@audree

Did your cardiologist explain the cardioversion procedure? I was an emergency Afib patient on July 24, 2015 and was cared for by an emergency doctor. He had me on cardizem 360 and lasix 160 and coumadin. I was miserable with hugely swollen legs (plus 3) and still in Afib. That doctor told me to go through the scheduled hip replacement surgery in Afib and then get a cardioversion later. When I saw my own cardiologist one month later (August 27th) in a different hospital and city he told me no surgeon would perform on a patient in Afib and I’d have the cardioversion immediately (September 11, 2015.) It was successful, heart back in rhythm, and I then had surgery October 19, 2015. I was 86 years old then and did not flip back into Afib during the surgery. You may want to ask your cardiologist if you are a candidate for cardioversion. If not, why not?

I got off the coumadin after 10 months because it was not compatible with my food requirements and I now take Pradaxa since May 10, 2016. Pradaxa has an excellent antidote and I have seen no side effects from taking it except it costs much more than coumadin. Report is that they are backing off of coumadin now because it can take up to 72 hours to stop bleeding. Much too long for safety.

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Welcome to Connect @2880. Great to hear that your cardioversion was a success. Will you have to continue taking all 3 medications? Have you talked to your cardiologist about your ongoing fatigue?

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@audree

Did your cardiologist explain the cardioversion procedure? I was an emergency Afib patient on July 24, 2015 and was cared for by an emergency doctor. He had me on cardizem 360 and lasix 160 and coumadin. I was miserable with hugely swollen legs (plus 3) and still in Afib. That doctor told me to go through the scheduled hip replacement surgery in Afib and then get a cardioversion later. When I saw my own cardiologist one month later (August 27th) in a different hospital and city he told me no surgeon would perform on a patient in Afib and I’d have the cardioversion immediately (September 11, 2015.) It was successful, heart back in rhythm, and I then had surgery October 19, 2015. I was 86 years old then and did not flip back into Afib during the surgery. You may want to ask your cardiologist if you are a candidate for cardioversion. If not, why not?

I got off the coumadin after 10 months because it was not compatible with my food requirements and I now take Pradaxa since May 10, 2016. Pradaxa has an excellent antidote and I have seen no side effects from taking it except it costs much more than coumadin. Report is that they are backing off of coumadin now because it can take up to 72 hours to stop bleeding. Much too long for safety.

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Hello !
I am still on all drugs but have reduced Cardiazem to 120 mg -2x d .
Would love to not take that and the Flecanide –
Still in nsr but have a few palpatations in the evening .

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