Getting off of Seroquel

Posted by anniegk @anniegk, Jun 8, 2018

I have been on 300 mgs. Seroquel ER for over a year for augmenting my antidepressant which is 45 mgs. Of Mirtazapine. I decided to try and get off of the Seroquel. I was on 300mgs ER (extended release). I titrated down to 250 mg ER for 2 months without too many problems.than i titrated down to 200mgs ER just 5 days ago. My plan is to try to titrate off using ER tablets. My thinking is that perhaps the drug will remove its self from my system more gradually. I have had some nausea and a couple of episodes of diarrhea. I also have a very irregular heart beat and was started on 60 mgs of Propranolol ER (extended release) 4 weeks ago. It seems to be helping my heartbeat. I have wondered if the nausea and light headness is from the Propranolol, a Beta Blocker, or the dose reduction of the Seroquel. I also wonder if the way iam titrating the Seroquel is safe. My doctor says it will only take a couple of weeks…I think that is too fast of a taper after being on a drug for over a year. What do you think?

You should not call Seroquel a dangerous drug. It is only dangerous in overdose or for patients who have severe adverse effects. For millions, Seroquel has meant the differece between life or death and sanity vs psychosis. So I only ask you to check your facts before you make grave statements against any drug. No drug is perfectly safe. It's always a balance between therapeutic effect and side effects.

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Hello, all — as some questions have arisen in this discussion regarding quetiapine (Seroquel) uses, side effects and tapering, we asked a Mayo Clinic pharmacist to provide some input. This is what she said:

Seroquel (quetiapine) is considered a new generation antipsychotic. The newer generation cause less movement disorders. It is impossible to predict the likelihood of movement disorders developing in an individual, but estimates are usually between 5-15% of the general population and range from restlessness to irreversible impairment. Most often these are reversible on decrease or discontinuation of the offending drug.

Seroquel is approved for use in other mood disorders including bipolar disorder. It is also used for anxiety and depressive disorders. It is not a first choice for insomnia.

Seroquel can also cause some dizziness especially with standing up after sitting or lying down. It can also cause some upset stomach. These effects are more common when starting therapy and often go away with time. It can sometimes affect cholesterol and weight. Dry mouth, pain, fatigue, and insomnia can also occur.

Rapid tapering or discontinuation can cause nausea, vomiting and mental status changes. Only your care provider can manage the discontinuation of your medications, as tapering recommendations should be individualized.

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Good morning @lisalucier and others inquiring about side effects. I like this sentence in your post "These effects are more common when starting therapy and often go away with time." I found this to be true of Gabapentin in the treatment of small fiber neuropathy (SFN). Now I make sure I do two things….(1) give it some time and (2) go to my health chart and list the effects I am feeling so that my medical provider can respond. That is a lot quicker than waiting for an appointment. And by the way….I have an OCD granddaughter who has been reliant on Seroquel for years. She just carefully guided herself off of it and is doing well although the thought intrusions have started up again. Sort of a darned if you do and darned if you don't situation. Thanks for your moderator services on "Connect".

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I have been taking seoquell for 20 yrs I get it down to 250 mg,I want to get off of the 50 mg.but I am having a trouble time,I am 70 yrs.i really need help with this

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@jenna16bella

I have been taking seoquell for 20 yrs I get it down to 250 mg,I want to get off of the 50 mg.but I am having a trouble time,I am 70 yrs.i really need help with this

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Hello, @jenna16bella – welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. We have many members here who have talked about having a troubled time tapering off quetiapine (Seroquel) like you mentioned and who were also seeking help, just like you.

You'll notice I have moved your message to this existing discussion, "Getting off of Seroquel" in the Depression & Anxiety group. I did this so that you could talk with the members in this conversation already talking about this journey and who are familiar with what you've inquired about. If you click VIEW & REPLY in the email notification, you can scroll back through the past and recent posts.

Hoping other members in this thread like @flpatt @num1boxer1919 @mariiland @jakedduck1 @debstime50 will have some input for you as you seek to taper your quetiapine (Seroquel) dosage from 50 mg to 0. @grandmar may also have some thoughts for you, as she has some experience tapering off medications.

Has your prescribing physician given you a schedule for safely getting off of this medication, @jenna16bella?

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@lisalucier

Hello, @jenna16bella – welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. We have many members here who have talked about having a troubled time tapering off quetiapine (Seroquel) like you mentioned and who were also seeking help, just like you.

You'll notice I have moved your message to this existing discussion, "Getting off of Seroquel" in the Depression & Anxiety group. I did this so that you could talk with the members in this conversation already talking about this journey and who are familiar with what you've inquired about. If you click VIEW & REPLY in the email notification, you can scroll back through the past and recent posts.

Hoping other members in this thread like @flpatt @num1boxer1919 @mariiland @jakedduck1 @debstime50 will have some input for you as you seek to taper your quetiapine (Seroquel) dosage from 50 mg to 0. @grandmar may also have some thoughts for you, as she has some experience tapering off medications.

Has your prescribing physician given you a schedule for safely getting off of this medication, @jenna16bella?

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I am currently tapering myself off of Seroquel. I had been put on it (without the dr tellig me all the horrendous side effects). First he put me on 100, 200, 300, 400 and then finally 500. I hate this drug!! I don't trust the dr who put me on it. I had been going through a really hard time with family, medical issues…..work…………..I began dropping the dosage down slowly. I am now down to 100……..and working toward 50 in a about a week.

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@lla2019

I am currently tapering myself off of Seroquel. I had been put on it (without the dr tellig me all the horrendous side effects). First he put me on 100, 200, 300, 400 and then finally 500. I hate this drug!! I don't trust the dr who put me on it. I had been going through a really hard time with family, medical issues…..work…………..I began dropping the dosage down slowly. I am now down to 100……..and working toward 50 in a about a week.

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Hi, @lla2019 – how is the taper going so far? Are you experiencing any side effects?

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@lisalucier

Hello, @jenna16bella – welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. We have many members here who have talked about having a troubled time tapering off quetiapine (Seroquel) like you mentioned and who were also seeking help, just like you.

You'll notice I have moved your message to this existing discussion, "Getting off of Seroquel" in the Depression & Anxiety group. I did this so that you could talk with the members in this conversation already talking about this journey and who are familiar with what you've inquired about. If you click VIEW & REPLY in the email notification, you can scroll back through the past and recent posts.

Hoping other members in this thread like @flpatt @num1boxer1919 @mariiland @jakedduck1 @debstime50 will have some input for you as you seek to taper your quetiapine (Seroquel) dosage from 50 mg to 0. @grandmar may also have some thoughts for you, as she has some experience tapering off medications.

Has your prescribing physician given you a schedule for safely getting off of this medication, @jenna16bella?

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Does anyone know if trying to come down on the amount you take would raise the third number on your blood pressure.

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@lisalucier

Hi, @lla2019 – how is the taper going so far? Are you experiencing any side effects?

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Have you notice if the third number on your blood pressure has gone up.m8n3 has always been in the 60sbut know it is in 70s.

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There are only two numbers on blood pressure. Systolic and diastolic. What is the third number?

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@lisalucier

Hello, @jenna16bella – welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. We have many members here who have talked about having a troubled time tapering off quetiapine (Seroquel) like you mentioned and who were also seeking help, just like you.

You'll notice I have moved your message to this existing discussion, "Getting off of Seroquel" in the Depression & Anxiety group. I did this so that you could talk with the members in this conversation already talking about this journey and who are familiar with what you've inquired about. If you click VIEW & REPLY in the email notification, you can scroll back through the past and recent posts.

Hoping other members in this thread like @flpatt @num1boxer1919 @mariiland @jakedduck1 @debstime50 will have some input for you as you seek to taper your quetiapine (Seroquel) dosage from 50 mg to 0. @grandmar may also have some thoughts for you, as she has some experience tapering off medications.

Has your prescribing physician given you a schedule for safely getting off of this medication, @jenna16bella?

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No,I just wanted to drop the 50mg and keep the 200,what would the side effect be.

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@jenna16bella

Does anyone know if trying to come down on the amount you take would raise the third number on your blood pressure.

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@jenna16bella
My best guess is your talking about your heart rate according to the numbers you cite. It sometimes is written written 120/80/72 or 120/80/72/18
120 systolic pressure,
heart is beating ( max force)
80 diastolic pressure
at rest (min force)
72 heart rate (pulse)
18 breaths per minute
You may be talking about pulse pressure which is the difference between your systolic and diastolic pressure (120-80=40.) Normal pulse pressure is 30 to 50mmHg. Although not often written this way it is possible to see 5 numbers
Diastolic pressure
Systolic pressure
Pulse pressure
Heart rate
Respiration
Hope this helps answer your question.
Jake

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@anniegk
Hi there,
Is the Mirtazapine controlling your depression? Studies have shown Seroquil does not help depression or anxiety nor does it help sleep disorders although I’ve heard that it has helped numerous people with sleep issues, probably because of it’s side effect of drowsiness. Do you believe you can stop the Seroquel without going into a regressive depressive state?
Going off medication can be tricky. Some can decrease it faster than others. When I discontinued the Anticonvulsant Neurontin I stopped relatively quickly but with the Benzodiazepine Anticonvulsant
Klonopin I didn’t think I’d ever get off it.
If you continue to your titration make sure you do it slooooooooooooowly, at least slower than you have been since you had symptoms. My own unprofessional opinion is Antipsychotic medication shouldn’t be used for Anxiety or depression. Unfortunately doctors can write prescriptions for off label uses thereby abusing this class of medication. Also the manufacturer of this medication was promoting it for numerous ailments not approved by the FDA which led the government to sue the manufacturer for over a half billion dollars. No wonder our medicine is so expensive we have to pay for their greed. Seroquil can increase a pamphlet tients chance of getting Seroquil induced Diabetes. It can also increase the heart rate which can lead to other problems usually more so if you are on higher dose. I hope you can come off this medication safely by doing it slowly. Remember going slow comes with great benefits. Too quickly can come with bad side effects.
Both of these drugs can cause nausea and headache. Which one is most likely to I don’t know.
I agree with you regarding the taper. It indeed seems very fast to me. The two week time frame is more reasonable if you were switching to another medication.
I wish you hope and great success coming off Seroquel.
Jake

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@lla2019

I am currently tapering myself off of Seroquel. I had been put on it (without the dr tellig me all the horrendous side effects). First he put me on 100, 200, 300, 400 and then finally 500. I hate this drug!! I don't trust the dr who put me on it. I had been going through a really hard time with family, medical issues…..work…………..I began dropping the dosage down slowly. I am now down to 100……..and working toward 50 in a about a week.

Jump to this post

@lla2019
Your reducing your dose by 50%. Personally I wouldn’t reduce it by so much, however some people can do so and have still have an unremarkable taper. It is unusual with such a powerful drug and one with such a short half-life (6 hours.) To some people I know personally and others I’ve read about with schizophrenia this drug has been a Godsend but in some that help came with a high price.
I’m hoping you have an uneventful taper. I have little doubt you’ll feel much better once off this powerful drug.
Good luck to you,
Jake

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@jakedduck1

@jenna16bella
My best guess is your talking about your heart rate according to the numbers you cite. It sometimes is written written 120/80/72 or 120/80/72/18
120 systolic pressure,
heart is beating ( max force)
80 diastolic pressure
at rest (min force)
72 heart rate (pulse)
18 breaths per minute
You may be talking about pulse pressure which is the difference between your systolic and diastolic pressure (120-80=40.) Normal pulse pressure is 30 to 50mmHg. Although not often written this way it is possible to see 5 numbers
Diastolic pressure
Systolic pressure
Pulse pressure
Heart rate
Respiration
Hope this helps answer your question.
Jake

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If heart pressure drops fr9m 65 to 83 is that bad

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