Fibromyalgia and adhesion & fascial issues

Posted by kach @kach, Apr 9 10:10pm

I have fibromyalgia and have had widespread skeletal muscle pain for a number of years. This past year, I started having pain issues due to adhesive capsulitis (freezing of my shoulder and ankle), myofascial adhesions, and plantar fasciitis. Is anyone else with fibromyalgia experiencing these type of issues? I am wondering if they are related to my fibromyalgia or some other underlying problem.

I have fibromyalgia and have had plantar fasciitis along with shoulder pain etc. I believe they are mainly unrelated but possibly the fibro and shoulder issues are linked as in my case whereby it was a result of overcompensating with the arm. Time made that issue better. Plantar fasciitis was resolved with physio and eventually orthotics (which also helped my ankle and knee pain). I hope this helps.

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Hello @kach and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I am glad you have joined members on Connect to get support and feedback on your fibromyalgia and other symptoms to see if others have found they are potentially related.

I see that @whattodo has already reached out to share. Other members who have been active recently in the fibromyalgia discussions include @faithann64 @healingone @migizii @parus @rwinney @sandytoes14 @babette and others who may have experiences they can share with you.

How long have you had fibromyalgia?

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Well, the first time that I actually went to see a specialist about my widespread pain and other issues was about 7 years ago at the age of 54. This was the point at which my symptoms were really interfering with my function and quality of life, although I had already been having symptoms for quite some time.

My ICD diagnosis at the time was chronic musculoskeletal pain even though the specialist told me that I met the criteria for fibromyalgia. She wasn’t helpful at all in providing me any information as to what I could do about it. I was also confused as to why my diagnosis ended up being chronic musculoskeletal pain when in the office she told me that I had fibromyalgia. It was only several years later that I learned that it was because an ICD code specifically for fibromyalgia had not been established yet! I am glad that a specific code was created: It is so much more than just chronic musculoskeletal pain!

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@kach thank you for sharing more of your story so other members can connect with you and provide you support. Have you shared your concerns and thoughts that these other symptoms may be related to your fibro with your doctor? If so, what information was shared back as a result?

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@whattodo

I have fibromyalgia and have had plantar fasciitis along with shoulder pain etc. I believe they are mainly unrelated but possibly the fibro and shoulder issues are linked as in my case whereby it was a result of overcompensating with the arm. Time made that issue better. Plantar fasciitis was resolved with physio and eventually orthotics (which also helped my ankle and knee pain). I hope this helps.

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Thanks for your reply. I had to have extensive physical therapy and a cortisone shot for my frozen shoulder many months ago. Although it is still somewhat restricted, at least I am not dealing with the pain. It took a long time to get over my plantar fasciitis pain.

Orthotics, wearing a brace at night, icing, cortisone shot, and physical therapy didn’t seem to be help me that much. I ended up having 7 sonic wave treatments which broke up scar tissue that had formed and to initiate a new healing process. The treatments hurt soooo much, but at least I can walk again without pain. I still have issues with really tight plantar fascia, so my husband massages it fairly regularly!

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Note:
I also have really “sticky” myofascia (lots of adhesions between my myofascia and muscles), so I always feel like my muscles are restricted and tight. The myofascia should be able to glide across the muscle but mine doesn’t.

I have had a medical massage therapist do myofascial release techniques on me. I can feel the myofascia release. It really helps and makes me feel better for awhile, but my myofascia just becomes sticky again. I can’t have it done regularly enough because of the cost. My therapist said that she her patients with fibromyalgia seem to be more likely to have “sticky” myofascia than her patients that do not.

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@kach

Note:
I also have really “sticky” myofascia (lots of adhesions between my myofascia and muscles), so I always feel like my muscles are restricted and tight. The myofascia should be able to glide across the muscle but mine doesn’t.

I have had a medical massage therapist do myofascial release techniques on me. I can feel the myofascia release. It really helps and makes me feel better for awhile, but my myofascia just becomes sticky again. I can’t have it done regularly enough because of the cost. My therapist said that she her patients with fibromyalgia seem to be more likely to have “sticky” myofascia than her patients that do not.

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,@kach I have had fibromyalgia for over 30 yrs Then they didn't know and still don't what causes it not treatment. Isometric exercises before light exercising helps as well as the Ice heat,massage light One masuse? went to deep that doesn't work Pain killers yes but most importantly is saying No to more activities that you know you,ll pay for next day It's pacing yourself I have found out .

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@lioness

,@kach I have had fibromyalgia for over 30 yrs Then they didn't know and still don't what causes it not treatment. Isometric exercises before light exercising helps as well as the Ice heat,massage light One masuse? went to deep that doesn't work Pain killers yes but most importantly is saying No to more activities that you know you,ll pay for next day It's pacing yourself I have found out .

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@lioness, @kach Hello, all. Well, we all know this crazy fibromyalgia is a tough one. Like you, lioness, I was diagnosed with fibro in the dark ages, when I was in my 30's and the doctors had no idea what was happening.

Well, last year I saw, a Mayo YouTube of a Fibro convention in Ireland. I learned it is real, extremely painful all over, never goes away and seems to resist almost everything we try for relief…..and, I learned they now know we have painful related issues…And, because of fibromyalgia, we feel more intense pain than other folks. It's amplified. What an eye opener for me. I knew from experience, but I never believed it was real, thought I was imagining

I'm 74 now and recently learned to do what you mentioned, lioness. I'm taking control of my body, of my life, listening to what my body says. I've all my life pushed to go far beyond the point my body began screaming at me with pain and exhaustion, wasn't going to let this pain stop me! It seems we're always in fight mode with this illness, aren't we. Fighting against having it, against the pain and to keep going.

Well, if we stop fighting and let our body speak to us, we'd slow down, rest, take a day off to recuperate from over-doing the day before I'm resting today, after doing too much and I didn't stop when I should. I have a small fridge in a 2nd bedroom, a coffee maker, microwave, and keep cold diet coke/water/green tea and whatever, with yogurt and fruit and other foods so I can stay upstairs. I have 14 steps to climb. When I need to take a day off or can't function well, I stay upstairs. At first I thought I was giving in to the illness. I felt defeated. NO. It's listening to my body and helping myself heal. Doing what's good for me.

It took me 40 years to admit that I can not do what I want. I refused to be defeated! I'm not defeated. I'm surviving.

Several years ago, my shoulder began hurting. I have a torn rotator cuff. Don't know how or when, but it was painful. No surgery, so, I worked w/PT for a year. Same with my elbow. Wrist. Hands. Legs. Back. and more.

And, a PT therapy pool is my salvation. with warm water, exercise in the water for 1 hour. No more. I must be careful not to overdo and undo the benefits. I urge anyone w/fibro to ask your doctor re this therapy. Insurance covers the cost. For me, no other exercise or pay dearly in long-term pain. Just the pool. And walking, very carefully w/my walker and just until I begin to tire. Massage is wonderful, but costly.

I take Robaxin for muscle relaxation as my muscles are tight and fight all the time. That helps. Cymbalta is one of the best meds for me for the firbo pain. As is MMJ. I use 1:1 tincture nightly for anxiety, pain, insomnia, and sleep well. Requip for dopamine enhancement for RLS. And, a b-pap for apnea. And, I sleep. Good rest;

Now, it has taken me all these decades to get here. These are some of my answers for these issues. I'm living, surviving, and healing at times now. All because God finally got through to me, I got Mayo Clinic help, I'm on Connect and have my friends here to keep me going and help me grow. And, I'm working like a trojan to accept my body as it is and life as I can have it. Still hurt. Still have down days. Still get worse, then better….I'm thankful.
Blessings to you on this crazy journey of ours. elizabeth

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My fibromyalgia is terrible and like you all I have to pace myself. It's really tough to ask for help but I am learning that I have to. My PC wants me to try lyrica but I did try Cymbalta and it made me really sick. Right now I take 900mg of Gabapentin, Tylenol, and 1-1 CBD. I have a left hip replacement and my right hip needs to be replaced but my orthopedic doesn't think I am a good candidate for the surgery. I am very overweight and I have severe osteo arthritis and my thumbs have collapsed from the loss of cartilage. Plus I have really bad neck and back problems. I don't know if it's all related to fibro. I also have AFIB, sleep apnea and Sjogrens. I am 76 and my PC and ortho both have told me not to walk much. I now have a scooter. My PC wants me to only exercise in a warm pool but the movement of the water brings on vertigo. My mother used to say that the "golden years are tarnished"! I have to focus on the good things I have- husband, family, children and grandchildren. Plus I still can walk. I have determined to lose weight and to keep a positive attitude. That does help. Good luck everyone and keep fighting.

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@amandajro

Hello @kach and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I am glad you have joined members on Connect to get support and feedback on your fibromyalgia and other symptoms to see if others have found they are potentially related.

I see that @whattodo has already reached out to share. Other members who have been active recently in the fibromyalgia discussions include @faithann64 @healingone @migizii @parus @rwinney @sandytoes14 @babette and others who may have experiences they can share with you.

How long have you had fibromyalgia?

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@migizii I was diagnosed in 2016 (I think) and was surprised by it. I didn’t understand it then and still really don’t understand it very much now. I attended the 1 1/2 day class at Mayo; followed many of the class suggestions; but still don’t seem to know when I have pain or fatigue what is going on. I don’t communicate with their office (which maybe I should) but I have other pain disorders, so I am usually confused by it (unless it’s migraines-classic and chronic since childhood). One day at a time❤️

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@ess77

@lioness, @kach Hello, all. Well, we all know this crazy fibromyalgia is a tough one. Like you, lioness, I was diagnosed with fibro in the dark ages, when I was in my 30's and the doctors had no idea what was happening.

Well, last year I saw, a Mayo YouTube of a Fibro convention in Ireland. I learned it is real, extremely painful all over, never goes away and seems to resist almost everything we try for relief…..and, I learned they now know we have painful related issues…And, because of fibromyalgia, we feel more intense pain than other folks. It's amplified. What an eye opener for me. I knew from experience, but I never believed it was real, thought I was imagining

I'm 74 now and recently learned to do what you mentioned, lioness. I'm taking control of my body, of my life, listening to what my body says. I've all my life pushed to go far beyond the point my body began screaming at me with pain and exhaustion, wasn't going to let this pain stop me! It seems we're always in fight mode with this illness, aren't we. Fighting against having it, against the pain and to keep going.

Well, if we stop fighting and let our body speak to us, we'd slow down, rest, take a day off to recuperate from over-doing the day before I'm resting today, after doing too much and I didn't stop when I should. I have a small fridge in a 2nd bedroom, a coffee maker, microwave, and keep cold diet coke/water/green tea and whatever, with yogurt and fruit and other foods so I can stay upstairs. I have 14 steps to climb. When I need to take a day off or can't function well, I stay upstairs. At first I thought I was giving in to the illness. I felt defeated. NO. It's listening to my body and helping myself heal. Doing what's good for me.

It took me 40 years to admit that I can not do what I want. I refused to be defeated! I'm not defeated. I'm surviving.

Several years ago, my shoulder began hurting. I have a torn rotator cuff. Don't know how or when, but it was painful. No surgery, so, I worked w/PT for a year. Same with my elbow. Wrist. Hands. Legs. Back. and more.

And, a PT therapy pool is my salvation. with warm water, exercise in the water for 1 hour. No more. I must be careful not to overdo and undo the benefits. I urge anyone w/fibro to ask your doctor re this therapy. Insurance covers the cost. For me, no other exercise or pay dearly in long-term pain. Just the pool. And walking, very carefully w/my walker and just until I begin to tire. Massage is wonderful, but costly.

I take Robaxin for muscle relaxation as my muscles are tight and fight all the time. That helps. Cymbalta is one of the best meds for me for the firbo pain. As is MMJ. I use 1:1 tincture nightly for anxiety, pain, insomnia, and sleep well. Requip for dopamine enhancement for RLS. And, a b-pap for apnea. And, I sleep. Good rest;

Now, it has taken me all these decades to get here. These are some of my answers for these issues. I'm living, surviving, and healing at times now. All because God finally got through to me, I got Mayo Clinic help, I'm on Connect and have my friends here to keep me going and help me grow. And, I'm working like a trojan to accept my body as it is and life as I can have it. Still hurt. Still have down days. Still get worse, then better….I'm thankful.
Blessings to you on this crazy journey of ours. elizabeth

Jump to this post

After many years of pushing myself to do more, pacing myself and not overdoing it has been a learning experience. I can’t do as much as I used to do and trying to do more, even on the days when I feel better and have more energy, never pays off. I end up hitting a wall and simply need more recovery time. I take Cymbalta. I haven’t taken a muscle relaxer but have often wondered if that would be helpful for me.

I have asthma, sleep apnea, Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism, and chronic kidney disease along with fibromyalgia and am plagued by chronic fatigue. Prior to all of this, I was very physically active, I was a competitive volleyball player and race walker. I ran the Chicago marathon at the age of 35 and was very lean.

As chronic pain and fatigue became a way of life in my late 30s, my days of being physically active ended. My BMI is now an unhealthy 36+. I have been on a low cal, gluten-restricted and dairy-free diet for the past 5 months but have only lost about 5 lbs. It is very discouraging. I am pre-diabetic and am very concerned about developing diabetes given my chronic kidney disease. I keep plowing away.

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@kach

After many years of pushing myself to do more, pacing myself and not overdoing it has been a learning experience. I can’t do as much as I used to do and trying to do more, even on the days when I feel better and have more energy, never pays off. I end up hitting a wall and simply need more recovery time. I take Cymbalta. I haven’t taken a muscle relaxer but have often wondered if that would be helpful for me.

I have asthma, sleep apnea, Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism, and chronic kidney disease along with fibromyalgia and am plagued by chronic fatigue. Prior to all of this, I was very physically active, I was a competitive volleyball player and race walker. I ran the Chicago marathon at the age of 35 and was very lean.

As chronic pain and fatigue became a way of life in my late 30s, my days of being physically active ended. My BMI is now an unhealthy 36+. I have been on a low cal, gluten-restricted and dairy-free diet for the past 5 months but have only lost about 5 lbs. It is very discouraging. I am pre-diabetic and am very concerned about developing diabetes given my chronic kidney disease. I keep plowing away.

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Congratulations on the lifestyle changes you have made, @kach. It isn't easy to make these kinds of changes, but as many of us have discovered a chronic illness like, Fibromyalgia, demands that we make changes if we want to feel better.

Weight loss will come along as you are faithful to healthy eating habits and moderate exercise. Try your best not to be discouraged.

I hope you post again with an update. Will you keep providing Connect with updates?

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