Eye sight getting worse after holding steady for 5+years

Posted by ellerbracke @ellerbracke, 6 days ago

I started to use reading glasses roughly 12 years ago, moving from low magnification up to 3.0. And held there. And was quite capable to still read most print without glasses the longer time went on…. better vision in latter years. I read that it may be a side effect of cataracts, where vision improves for a while before going downhill. It’s going softly down-slope now. I can still read most average print type for a short while as in instructions, etc. as opposed to reading books for hours, but I noticed that I’ve got trouble making sure I got the last little bit of garlic skin off before chopping. So I guess I’m heading for cataract surgery? Maybe? Have had night halos for 8 years or more, have limited night driving. Also, have never seen an eye doctor – only optometrists. So – what type of eye professional should I start out seeing?

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@ellerbracke Worsening vision seems to come with age…If you are getting regular eye exams with your optometrist, who has a chart of your history, and being checked each time for cataracts, glaucoma and other issues, you should be good.
On the other hand, if you have diabetes, circulatory issues, or other high risk conditions, you should be under the care of an ophthalmologist. Or if you are concerned about your declining vision, you may want to see one at least once to rule out issues.
Sue

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@sueinmn: thanks. I not only need to find an optometrist, I almost needed to find the definition of one. Have been majorly neglecting anything regarding vision since DMV stopped giving vision tests. Was far sighted, with prescription glasses about 10 years ago, then those glasses did not work any more because vision got progressively better. I guess now’s the time to have an assessment. Duh (my DUH).

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@sueinmn

@ellerbracke Worsening vision seems to come with age…If you are getting regular eye exams with your optometrist, who has a chart of your history, and being checked each time for cataracts, glaucoma and other issues, you should be good.
On the other hand, if you have diabetes, circulatory issues, or other high risk conditions, you should be under the care of an ophthalmologist. Or if you are concerned about your declining vision, you may want to see one at least once to rule out issues.
Sue

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@sueinmn I found that really helpful because I too am having issues with my vision and I have dry eye and diabetes. My optometrist treats my dry eye… However I did not know there was such a thing as an ophthalmologist..or maybe I thought they were one in the same. I am actually going to look into this on my next visit. Thanks!

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@sheri728

@sueinmn I found that really helpful because I too am having issues with my vision and I have dry eye and diabetes. My optometrist treats my dry eye… However I did not know there was such a thing as an ophthalmologist..or maybe I thought they were one in the same. I am actually going to look into this on my next visit. Thanks!

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Hi Sheri – An ophthalmologist is an MD with a specialty in the diseases& conditions of the eye. They have training in interpretation of a wide variety of complex diagnostic eye tests. There are even sub-specialties – like retinologist and neuro ophthalmologist.

An optometrist is trained to examine eyes, prescribe corrections, and recognize diseases, but is not an MD, cannot do surgery and in most states cannot give eye injections.

People with diabetes should see an ophthalmologist at least once to check for diabetic retinopathy and other conditions. If all is well, you may be told you can go back to seeing your optometrist routinely (at least once a year) with periodic rechecks by the doc.

I was raised seeing an optometrist and ophthalmologist alternately – every year without fail – because my Mom grew up so nearsighted she was virtually blind and she didn't want us 6 kids to live like that. At one point, 5 of us wore glasses, but my Dad's union had fabulous insurance. At one point, the optician said to my Mom, "Mrs A, do you realize we have seen someone from your family 50 times this year?"

I have seen an ophthalmologist most of adult my life, having had a couple of corneal injuries from flying metal, an unexplained retinal bleed, and now glaucoma and age-related cataracts. Two years ago, I demanded that my husband switch from his optometrist because he was having trouble driving – within a few weeks he had cataract surgery on both eyes.

Sue

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