Does Vitamin B-12 help with neuropathy of the feet?

Posted by Carol, Volunteer Mentor @retiredteacher, Thu, Jan 24 7:50pm

I have developed neuropathy in my feet—-especially the soles. When I walk, it's like walking on shards of glass that are on fire. Several articles indicate that B-12 can help. I don't want to take any prescribed meds. I have Diabetes 2. This not being able to walk without intense pain has kept me from even walking the grocery store to buy groceries. Can anyone give me information about B-12 and foot neuropathy?
Thanks,
Carol

Hi @retiredteacher. While I can’t cite specific articles, in my experience neurologists look for a much higher daily level of B12 in your blood than a general practitioner does. They may suggest you take it as a supplement. Lack of B12 has been linked to certain neuropathies, I hope it brings you some relief.

I take B-12 and have same problem with my feet feels like there is pieces of bone chips in them when you try to walk but unless your B-12 level is low it will not change things. Have your levels checked sometimes our B-12 levels get low in our bodies and if your are then oh yes it will help.

Hi Carol @retiredteacher, Vitamin B12 is one of the supplements I take for my small fiber peripheral neuropathy. It's not a cure but helps relieve some of the symptoms for me. Here are some articles that may help provide a little more information.

B Vitamins for Neuropathy and Neuropathic Pain
https://www.omicsonline.org/open-access/b-vitamins-for-neuropathy-and-neuropathic-pain-2376-1318-1000161.php?aid=90896

NIH – Nutritional Neuropathies
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4199287/

Liked by teetee7, elained

For me b-12 made things worse. Make sure you have your levels checked. To much b-12 can aggravate the nerves.

Liked by teetee7, elained

@fbell330

For me b-12 made things worse. Make sure you have your levels checked. To much b-12 can aggravate the nerves.

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Hi @fbell330, That's interesting, I've never heard of B12 doing anything to aggrevate the nerves and have never seen any research or data showing it can be harmful. I know each of us are different in how we absorb different vitamins and minerals and that could account for problems or conditions. I am interested in learning more if you can point me to some references on why B12 made things worse for you. Thank you…John

Liked by teetee7, elained

@johnbishop

Hi Carol @retiredteacher, Vitamin B12 is one of the supplements I take for my small fiber peripheral neuropathy. It's not a cure but helps relieve some of the symptoms for me. Here are some articles that may help provide a little more information.

B Vitamins for Neuropathy and Neuropathic Pain
https://www.omicsonline.org/open-access/b-vitamins-for-neuropathy-and-neuropathic-pain-2376-1318-1000161.php?aid=90896

NIH – Nutritional Neuropathies
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4199287/

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Hello John. Thank you for sharing these articles. Very helpful! Can you share information on other supplements you are taking for PN?

@vilee

Hello John. Thank you for sharing these articles. Very helpful! Can you share information on other supplements you are taking for PN?

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Hi @vilee, here's the link to my story posted earlier on Connect. The post describes my search and what I found that helps me. Also has links to the page where I get the protocol of supplements I take.

https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/anyone-here-dealing-with-peripheral-neuropathy/?pg=42#comment-65985

Liked by teetee7, elained

@deann1970

I take B-12 and have same problem with my feet feels like there is pieces of bone chips in them when you try to walk but unless your B-12 level is low it will not change things. Have your levels checked sometimes our B-12 levels get low in our bodies and if your are then oh yes it will help.

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I took very high doses of a particular formulation of B vitamin called Methyl B (from Jarrow) for almost two years, starting in 2012-2013. There had been some studies showing nerve regeneration from treatment with this B Vitamin.

I understood this 'treatment' without medical supervision, on my own, after discussion with others who had heard of possible positive results.

I had absolutely no improvement, and in fact continued to deteriorate from atrophy of my lower legs and general weakness and instability.

I did not have a deficiency of Vitamin B in blood tests, prior to this experiment. In fact, I never had deficiency in any vitamin.

So this is what I found in my own experience with Vitamin B therapy.

Regards, ElaineD

@elained

I took very high doses of a particular formulation of B vitamin called Methyl B (from Jarrow) for almost two years, starting in 2012-2013. There had been some studies showing nerve regeneration from treatment with this B Vitamin.

I understood this 'treatment' without medical supervision, on my own, after discussion with others who had heard of possible positive results.

I had absolutely no improvement, and in fact continued to deteriorate from atrophy of my lower legs and general weakness and instability.

I did not have a deficiency of Vitamin B in blood tests, prior to this experiment. In fact, I never had deficiency in any vitamin.

So this is what I found in my own experience with Vitamin B therapy.

Regards, ElaineD

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I too worry about muscle atrophy and loss. I've picked up a little more on the exercise to help and I'm still working on improving my eating habits. I eat fairly healthy but I do have my days. Lots of info out there on helping with the muscle atrophy but I have to believe it boils down to enough protein and regular exercise of some sort.

https://nuts.com/healthy-eating/preventing-muscle-degeneration

Liked by teetee7

@johnbishop

I too worry about muscle atrophy and loss. I've picked up a little more on the exercise to help and I'm still working on improving my eating habits. I eat fairly healthy but I do have my days. Lots of info out there on helping with the muscle atrophy but I have to believe it boils down to enough protein and regular exercise of some sort.

https://nuts.com/healthy-eating/preventing-muscle-degeneration

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Interesting, John. I cannot 'walk' in the normal sense, but I spend about an hour on the NU-STEP several times a week. I also exercise in the water, tho' i know that won't affect the atrophy.

I believe that my muscle atrophy is primarily caused by denervation. Two of the primary nerves in my lowers legs are completely non-responsive in an EMG and the third is severely damaged.

First EMG 2010:

INTERPRETATION:
1. PROFOUND AXONAL NEUROPATHY: RIGHT AND LEFT PERONEAL AND TIBIAL NERVES.
2. PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY: RIGHT AND LEFT PERONEAL AND TIBIAL NERVES.
3. RIGHT AND LEFT SURAL NERVE NEUROPATHY

QUOTE Denervated muscles atrophy rapidly. Neurogenic atrophy is faster and more complete than disuse atrophy, although these types may be difficult to differentiate in some patients.

This quote is from Science Direct. Because I'm new I cannot include links in my posts.

QUOTE: Axonal degenerative polyneuropathies tend to produce weakness along with muscle atrophy, but atrophy is much less conspicuous in segmental demyelinating polyneuropathies because in these disorders the axon remains in continuity with the muscle, preventing denervation atrophy. The most common symptom in polyneuropathy is weakness in dorsiflexion of the feet at the ankles. This can result in a partial or complete foot drop that typically causes the feet to slap while walking and predisposes the patient to stumble and fall when the toes catch on an uneven surface.

This quote is from the Cleveland Clinic. I cannot post the link.

@elained

Interesting, John. I cannot 'walk' in the normal sense, but I spend about an hour on the NU-STEP several times a week. I also exercise in the water, tho' i know that won't affect the atrophy.

I believe that my muscle atrophy is primarily caused by denervation. Two of the primary nerves in my lowers legs are completely non-responsive in an EMG and the third is severely damaged.

First EMG 2010:

INTERPRETATION:
1. PROFOUND AXONAL NEUROPATHY: RIGHT AND LEFT PERONEAL AND TIBIAL NERVES.
2. PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY: RIGHT AND LEFT PERONEAL AND TIBIAL NERVES.
3. RIGHT AND LEFT SURAL NERVE NEUROPATHY

QUOTE Denervated muscles atrophy rapidly. Neurogenic atrophy is faster and more complete than disuse atrophy, although these types may be difficult to differentiate in some patients.

This quote is from Science Direct. Because I'm new I cannot include links in my posts.

QUOTE: Axonal degenerative polyneuropathies tend to produce weakness along with muscle atrophy, but atrophy is much less conspicuous in segmental demyelinating polyneuropathies because in these disorders the axon remains in continuity with the muscle, preventing denervation atrophy. The most common symptom in polyneuropathy is weakness in dorsiflexion of the feet at the ankles. This can result in a partial or complete foot drop that typically causes the feet to slap while walking and predisposes the patient to stumble and fall when the toes catch on an uneven surface.

This quote is from the Cleveland Clinic. I cannot post the link.

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Then there's that…☺ Learn something new everyday. Thanks ElaineD.

Thanks a big bunch,John, for sharing the nuts.com website. It provided do very much useful information. You're the best.
Rose

@elained

Interesting, John. I cannot 'walk' in the normal sense, but I spend about an hour on the NU-STEP several times a week. I also exercise in the water, tho' i know that won't affect the atrophy.

I believe that my muscle atrophy is primarily caused by denervation. Two of the primary nerves in my lowers legs are completely non-responsive in an EMG and the third is severely damaged.

First EMG 2010:

INTERPRETATION:
1. PROFOUND AXONAL NEUROPATHY: RIGHT AND LEFT PERONEAL AND TIBIAL NERVES.
2. PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY: RIGHT AND LEFT PERONEAL AND TIBIAL NERVES.
3. RIGHT AND LEFT SURAL NERVE NEUROPATHY

QUOTE Denervated muscles atrophy rapidly. Neurogenic atrophy is faster and more complete than disuse atrophy, although these types may be difficult to differentiate in some patients.

This quote is from Science Direct. Because I'm new I cannot include links in my posts.

QUOTE: Axonal degenerative polyneuropathies tend to produce weakness along with muscle atrophy, but atrophy is much less conspicuous in segmental demyelinating polyneuropathies because in these disorders the axon remains in continuity with the muscle, preventing denervation atrophy. The most common symptom in polyneuropathy is weakness in dorsiflexion of the feet at the ankles. This can result in a partial or complete foot drop that typically causes the feet to slap while walking and predisposes the patient to stumble and fall when the toes catch on an uneven surface.

This quote is from the Cleveland Clinic. I cannot post the link.

Jump to this post

Very interesting elaine and am wondering what NU Step is?
I want to underscore john’s urging us to do as much exercise as possible to maintain what muscle mass we can. I wear leg braces and know that with the huge walking and balance benefits my braces give me they prevent my calf and other muscles that I still have from being activated.
So I frequently walk around my house (very carefully) to use those leg muscles.

The NU-STEP is an exercise machine. You sit in the seat, and press the pedals back and forth (not like bike pedals, but rather like brake pedals) and at the same time you pull and push the large levers back and forth. So you exercise your legs and arms at the same time.

You can set the 'resistance' level, and adjust the seat and arm levers to fit your body.

The monitor displays your 'speed' and other measurements, like distance and calories consumed.

There is a tray below the monitor, where I place my large iPad. Using the wifi at the gym, and my cordless earphones, I can watch movies while I exercise.

It is marvelous.

I would post a link to show you the Nu-Step, but I am a new member and cannot post links yet.

Regards, ElaineD

@elained

The NU-STEP is an exercise machine. You sit in the seat, and press the pedals back and forth (not like bike pedals, but rather like brake pedals) and at the same time you pull and push the large levers back and forth. So you exercise your legs and arms at the same time.

You can set the 'resistance' level, and adjust the seat and arm levers to fit your body.

The monitor displays your 'speed' and other measurements, like distance and calories consumed.

There is a tray below the monitor, where I place my large iPad. Using the wifi at the gym, and my cordless earphones, I can watch movies while I exercise.

It is marvelous.

I would post a link to show you the Nu-Step, but I am a new member and cannot post links yet.

Regards, ElaineD

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Here are the different models/prices of the Nu-Step cross trainer @elained is using (I think):
https://www.nustep.com/product-category/cross-trainers/

Here's a less expensive hybrid elliptical-recumbent exercise bike that I use. I think the Nu-Step is better but the older model ProForm that I have works for my needs. It does have resistance settings. I use the elliptical every morning for about 10 to 15 minutes to help with the legs. I think any exercise is good. I wished I had an indoor pool for water therapy close by.
https://www.proform.com/hybrid-training

John

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