Does anyone know or have a INTRATHECAL PAIN PUMP?

Posted by jolenekellner53 @jolenekellner53, Mar 18, 2019

I've been offered it for unrelenting pain after two spinal fusions at L4L5 (2nd successful we think). Sounds too good to be true. ANY AND ALL COMMENTS APPRECIATED. Thanks so much.. I'm 65 and pain has taken over my life. Nerve pain not the issue.

My husband had a Medtronic pump implanted at Mayo in 2016 for late-stage cancer pain involving pathologically fractured ribs. The medicine they chose for him was morphine. The surgery was terribly hard on him and was to be a simple outpatient procedure, but he spent 4 days in the hospital, unable to recover from the general anesthesia. The morphine gave him little if any relief and finding a practitioner outside of the Mayo network to manage the dosage was nearly impossible. His health declined rapidly after the surgery and he lived for less than two months after that. I deeply regret putting him through that and have nothing positive to say about his experience with the pump. I hope others are having better results. The concept is good, though, but it's not for everyone.

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I had one implanted about 2 weeks ago.
For reference I also have 2 Stim units implanted (6 surgeries – due to doctor issues and one due to mechanical failure).

This surgery was outpatient and was the least painful recovery than any of the other ones.

In 2 weeks I already love the unit. They titrate up slowly but it has already given me more stable relfief than the pills, stimulators, or medical cannabis ever did. Plus I don’t have to carry pills around or worry if I forgot them at home.

I’d be glad to talk more if you want. I’ve been fighting chronic pain (as a result of Lyme disease) for more than 10 years now. Tried many different things.

So far this is the best hands down.
Carl

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The patient ambassador I talked to has had a Medtronic Pump for about 25 years and still loved it.

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@lisakuehl

My husband had a Medtronic pump implanted at Mayo in 2016 for late-stage cancer pain involving pathologically fractured ribs. The medicine they chose for him was morphine. The surgery was terribly hard on him and was to be a simple outpatient procedure, but he spent 4 days in the hospital, unable to recover from the general anesthesia. The morphine gave him little if any relief and finding a practitioner outside of the Mayo network to manage the dosage was nearly impossible. His health declined rapidly after the surgery and he lived for less than two months after that. I deeply regret putting him through that and have nothing positive to say about his experience with the pump. I hope others are having better results. The concept is good, though, but it's not for everyone.

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Lisa, so sorry for your loss. Why did they suggest a pump vs. Oral morphine? I had stage 4 esophageal cancer and used an opiate spray that helped manage the pain. Again, so sorry for your loss.

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We were told that the pump could deliver more effective medicine in much, much smaller amounts than oral opioids for the same amount of pain relief, with far fewer side effects. For my husband, it was a very bad choice, with no meaningful pain relief benefit and side effects worse than before the surgery. Thank you for your kind words. I am sure pumps help many people, but sadly my husband was not one of them.

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