Do you know about Telecoils & Hearing Loops in Public Spaces?

Posted by pegbell @pegbell, Mon, May 20 10:17am

Hoping to get some honest feedback from folks on whether or not they have been told about how to use the telecoil (T-Coil) in their hearing aid or CI. Ideally, the information is shared freely and helps people take advantage of the wireless solution to hearing clearly in noisy public spaces. Like a ramp for a wheelchair, a hearing loop system delivers audio directly to personal hearing devices without the need for any other equipment at places like hospitals, theaters, courtrooms, classrooms, meeting spaces, museums, etc.
So, the questions is this: when you first got your hearing device, were you told about the telecoil and using hearing loops? Simple yes or no is fine. If you'd like to share more please feel free. THANK YOU!

How_a_HearingLoop_Works

Liked by capausz

@judysmayo

My understanding is:
A neck loop is used to connect to remote mics, tv streamers and phones through Bluetooth for personal use. Some newer hearing aids have Bluetooth in the hearing aid so you don’t need a neck loop.
The T coil is a separate technology. It’s in your hearing aid and will link up with a looped room/area directly when you have your hearing aids in their T-coil program. An unlimited number of people can use it at once. You don’t need a neck loop to use t-coil.
There’s also FM radio wave technology and you would link the FM receiver to your personal neck loop w an audio cable.
I think it’s just extremely difficult for anyone over 60 to understand the technology that is required to manage the ALDs – assistive listening devices. It can become very confusing and I’ve needed my husband to help me set it up and manage it often. I have just about every ALD there is to help me hear in a variety of situations. It can be frustrating and confusing. HLAA has trained volunteers in a program they call N-CHATT to assist people with technological questions.

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@judysmayo
Hi,
While I agree that all these ALDS can be confusing, I take exception to your comment about anyone over 60 having extreme difficulty understanding the technology. I’m 78 and use ALDS and read up on new technology so I can learn more. People in my local chapter are either the same age and older and are using these devices. If something goes wrong with my computer, phone or tv network, I fix it most of the time. Admittedly, a lot of my generation is clueless and not interested. What gets me going is the assumption that all older people are clueless…it’s a stereotype that I see all the time, whether on tv, social media or in person.
As you can tell, it gets my dander up. We are living longer today and better keep up with what’s happening. I come across too many people in the course of the week that are so set in their ways and not even interested in the political and social climate of today. These are fairly active individuals but locked in their own world and content to let things go on as usual.

Okay, I went off on a rant and this is a different issue altogether. @pegbell mention that Audiologists have a lot on their plate just trying to convince people to address their hearing loss and she is right. So I will take the heat off that profession for not educating them about ALDS and loops😊

Hope I didn’t offend you in anyway..short story…had a young man hold open the door for my friend one day a while ago and he said “There you go grandpa” I smiled and said thank you and he’s not your grandfather.

Regards from Florida Mary

Liked by pegbell

REPLY
@imallears

@judysmayo
Hi,
While I agree that all these ALDS can be confusing, I take exception to your comment about anyone over 60 having extreme difficulty understanding the technology. I’m 78 and use ALDS and read up on new technology so I can learn more. People in my local chapter are either the same age and older and are using these devices. If something goes wrong with my computer, phone or tv network, I fix it most of the time. Admittedly, a lot of my generation is clueless and not interested. What gets me going is the assumption that all older people are clueless…it’s a stereotype that I see all the time, whether on tv, social media or in person.
As you can tell, it gets my dander up. We are living longer today and better keep up with what’s happening. I come across too many people in the course of the week that are so set in their ways and not even interested in the political and social climate of today. These are fairly active individuals but locked in their own world and content to let things go on as usual.

Okay, I went off on a rant and this is a different issue altogether. @pegbell mention that Audiologists have a lot on their plate just trying to convince people to address their hearing loss and she is right. So I will take the heat off that profession for not educating them about ALDS and loops😊

Hope I didn’t offend you in anyway..short story…had a young man hold open the door for my friend one day a while ago and he said “There you go grandpa” I smiled and said thank you and he’s not your grandfather.

Regards from Florida Mary

Jump to this post

Agreed about stereotyping older people, and am glad someone else responded to that so I wasn't 'first'! 🙂

However, I disagree about giving the people who sell hearing aids a pass on counseling their clients about technology that goes beyond hearing aids. I agree that too often, too much time is spent on trying to convince people to get hearing help, but once those people are in their office they have the opportunity to show them something almost magical. Take the time to demonstrate what a hearing loop/telecoil combo can do in a noisy setting. How hard is it for these professionals to install this equipment in their offices? Turn on some noise…like a radio in the room, turn the telecoil on in a pair of hearing aids,.and walk out of the room with the microphone and talk to the person who is trying out hearing aids. If that doesn't convince them, they don't want to hear. I believe that people who spend the large sum that a pair of good hearing aids costs, want to get the most out of those devices as possible, and it's only fair to disclose everything those devices can do. It's about taking time to educate. That should be a piece of the 'bundle' we are charged when we buy hearing aids.

I'm in my 70s and don't hesitate to try new technology. The people who influenced me to learn about telecoils, loops, and personal devices were the age I am now back then. They were the people who pushed the development of devices that go beyond hearing aids. Yes, I met them through SHHH. I thank those pioneers every time I benefit from telecoils. PS: Most hard of hearing people want to remain in the hearing mainstream. They are not going to gravitate to sign language and become oriented to deafness as a way of life. They want to hear. Hearing healthcare professionals should do everything possible to show them how. …And age should not be an issue.

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@davea

Nice graphic! Is it copyrighted? If so, do we have permission to use it?

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That graphic is published on the HLAA website but comes originally from a loop designer/installer out west — OToJOY. I will ask them and get back to you…I think they will be fine with anyone using the version that includes their logo and I can get that for you.

REPLY
@imallears

@judysmayo
Hi,
While I agree that all these ALDS can be confusing, I take exception to your comment about anyone over 60 having extreme difficulty understanding the technology. I’m 78 and use ALDS and read up on new technology so I can learn more. People in my local chapter are either the same age and older and are using these devices. If something goes wrong with my computer, phone or tv network, I fix it most of the time. Admittedly, a lot of my generation is clueless and not interested. What gets me going is the assumption that all older people are clueless…it’s a stereotype that I see all the time, whether on tv, social media or in person.
As you can tell, it gets my dander up. We are living longer today and better keep up with what’s happening. I come across too many people in the course of the week that are so set in their ways and not even interested in the political and social climate of today. These are fairly active individuals but locked in their own world and content to let things go on as usual.

Okay, I went off on a rant and this is a different issue altogether. @pegbell mention that Audiologists have a lot on their plate just trying to convince people to address their hearing loss and she is right. So I will take the heat off that profession for not educating them about ALDS and loops😊

Hope I didn’t offend you in anyway..short story…had a young man hold open the door for my friend one day a while ago and he said “There you go grandpa” I smiled and said thank you and he’s not your grandfather.

Regards from Florida Mary

Jump to this post

@imallears Yes I'm 77 and take apart move and put my computer back together Just because we our more mature doesn't mean we are dumb Good for you Off my soap box now

Liked by pegbell

REPLY
@julieo4

Agreed about stereotyping older people, and am glad someone else responded to that so I wasn't 'first'! 🙂

However, I disagree about giving the people who sell hearing aids a pass on counseling their clients about technology that goes beyond hearing aids. I agree that too often, too much time is spent on trying to convince people to get hearing help, but once those people are in their office they have the opportunity to show them something almost magical. Take the time to demonstrate what a hearing loop/telecoil combo can do in a noisy setting. How hard is it for these professionals to install this equipment in their offices? Turn on some noise…like a radio in the room, turn the telecoil on in a pair of hearing aids,.and walk out of the room with the microphone and talk to the person who is trying out hearing aids. If that doesn't convince them, they don't want to hear. I believe that people who spend the large sum that a pair of good hearing aids costs, want to get the most out of those devices as possible, and it's only fair to disclose everything those devices can do. It's about taking time to educate. That should be a piece of the 'bundle' we are charged when we buy hearing aids.

I'm in my 70s and don't hesitate to try new technology. The people who influenced me to learn about telecoils, loops, and personal devices were the age I am now back then. They were the people who pushed the development of devices that go beyond hearing aids. Yes, I met them through SHHH. I thank those pioneers every time I benefit from telecoils. PS: Most hard of hearing people want to remain in the hearing mainstream. They are not going to gravitate to sign language and become oriented to deafness as a way of life. They want to hear. Hearing healthcare professionals should do everything possible to show them how. …And age should not be an issue.

Jump to this post

@julio4
I agree and you just described what a good Audi or hearing aid tech is. They don’t get a pass! Unfortunately many people go to dispensers who are under the gun to sell as many hearings aids as possible because they are part of a chain. This goes for independents too who are concerned about making a living. Fortunately in Florida there are so many Audi’s and techs that we can be picky. The more educated we are as consumers, the more we can demand which is why , when I come across someone who is thinking of getting their hearing tested with the possibility of buying aids, I ask them to speak with me first. I even offer to go with them. No one has taken me up on that offer as of yet but I hope they listened to some of the advice I gave.

Regards from FL Mary

REPLY
@lioness

@imallears Yes I'm 77 and take apart move and put my computer back together Just because we our more mature doesn't mean we are dumb Good for you Off my soap box now

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Once a techie-geek, always a techie-geek? (Asked with respect and admiration that only a kindred spirit would possess 🙂

REPLY

Oops I stepped on some peoples' toes! No offense taken… good to be called out on labeling people. I'm 72 and I'm learning to advocate for myself. Yes, lack of interest in advocating for your best hearing outcomes spans all generations. There's many reasons there are so many people with hearing loss who do not even get hearing aids. They are had to reach! Not everyone wants to learn the ins and outs of ALD's and many people are scared of the technology. My HLAA chapter has a range of ages over 50 but no young people. The active members are all interested in learning about the latest in technology. We have a loop system installed by my techie (non professional) husband and just purchased new wireless mics. We have several people in our group who are great with technology. Our last two meetings were about the latest Apps to help with hearing challenges (given by our local N-CHATT rep) and a hands on sharing of our ALD's. We thought we'd have a big turnout but not many were interested.

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@davea

Nice graphic! Is it copyrighted? If so, do we have permission to use it?

Jump to this post

Yes, this graphic (with credit at bottom) can be used as long as a link to the company is included: http://www.otojoy.com 🙂

How a Hearing Loop Works - by OTOjOY

Liked by judysmayo

REPLY
@pegbell

That graphic is published on the HLAA website but comes originally from a loop designer/installer out west — OToJOY. I will ask them and get back to you…I think they will be fine with anyone using the version that includes their logo and I can get that for you.

Jump to this post

Thanks. I know the folks at OtoJoy.

Liked by pegbell

REPLY

One of my frustrations is that many Hearing Care Professionals don't mention the benefits of T-coils or Hearing Loops to patients or bother to put them in hearing aids. Hearing Loops really improve your hearing ability in meetings, churches, classrooms, theaters, airports, etc.

REPLY

Not the first time, but my SECOND audiologist was so helpful! Change your audiologist if he/she doesn't mention T-Coils.

Liked by pegbell

REPLY

No, had to ask.

REPLY
@imallears

@judysmayo
Hi,
While I agree that all these ALDS can be confusing, I take exception to your comment about anyone over 60 having extreme difficulty understanding the technology. I’m 78 and use ALDS and read up on new technology so I can learn more. People in my local chapter are either the same age and older and are using these devices. If something goes wrong with my computer, phone or tv network, I fix it most of the time. Admittedly, a lot of my generation is clueless and not interested. What gets me going is the assumption that all older people are clueless…it’s a stereotype that I see all the time, whether on tv, social media or in person.
As you can tell, it gets my dander up. We are living longer today and better keep up with what’s happening. I come across too many people in the course of the week that are so set in their ways and not even interested in the political and social climate of today. These are fairly active individuals but locked in their own world and content to let things go on as usual.

Okay, I went off on a rant and this is a different issue altogether. @pegbell mention that Audiologists have a lot on their plate just trying to convince people to address their hearing loss and she is right. So I will take the heat off that profession for not educating them about ALDS and loops😊

Hope I didn’t offend you in anyway..short story…had a young man hold open the door for my friend one day a while ago and he said “There you go grandpa” I smiled and said thank you and he’s not your grandfather.

Regards from Florida Mary

Jump to this post

People just do not want to deal with hearing issues because they do not want to admit needing something to help such as a hearing aid/ cane/ assistance from muggles( family/ friends) also as in my case and too many others is the cost of aids . Who has $6000 to spend . As I mentioned to a few folks at the convention in Rochester , NY ; shocking them too is that some of these over the counter aids are good as a backup for me in case my 16 plus hearing aids dies.. my loss is moderate to severe- cochlear implant t next year ( maybe – very hesitant- heard of jazz goer – that his friend got them and he no longer enjoys music – guy telling me this is with hearing – I went to Rochester Jazz after convention)
Stigma of aids is very far reaching. I have seen this all my lives. Also isolation/ depression impairs folks to the extent WHY BOTHER. Old age ( not enough is clarified on this alone ) and hearing loss with no family / friends means people will not endeavor to hear / interact . I am getting more and more in the category. People are calling me out on it. Case in poi t.i am having gallbladder surgery on July 22 Nd and I resent the fact that I must have someone to pick me up-no Uber allowed. I stated to folks who seems once a month or so that I think this is wrong and burdensome. They I cannot keep on trying to live life as a hermit. I interacts with folks on the street/ interacts at parks/ walks/ give tourists information but have no real friends and no family. I rather read then go out. I i Tera then Mimiialistily y. I have to walk/ bike to make sure I am okay back wise- kneewise . If I did not, my pain is worse. If it wasn’t for this, I would be reading all day. Pointing this out because a lot of folks isolates themselves for a lot of reasons. Hearing issues is one of the most dominant issue on the reasoning. We were the rock and rollers goi g to concerts and noise issues . Sorry for long bit

Liked by capausz

REPLY
@bookysue

People just do not want to deal with hearing issues because they do not want to admit needing something to help such as a hearing aid/ cane/ assistance from muggles( family/ friends) also as in my case and too many others is the cost of aids . Who has $6000 to spend . As I mentioned to a few folks at the convention in Rochester , NY ; shocking them too is that some of these over the counter aids are good as a backup for me in case my 16 plus hearing aids dies.. my loss is moderate to severe- cochlear implant t next year ( maybe – very hesitant- heard of jazz goer – that his friend got them and he no longer enjoys music – guy telling me this is with hearing – I went to Rochester Jazz after convention)
Stigma of aids is very far reaching. I have seen this all my lives. Also isolation/ depression impairs folks to the extent WHY BOTHER. Old age ( not enough is clarified on this alone ) and hearing loss with no family / friends means people will not endeavor to hear / interact . I am getting more and more in the category. People are calling me out on it. Case in poi t.i am having gallbladder surgery on July 22 Nd and I resent the fact that I must have someone to pick me up-no Uber allowed. I stated to folks who seems once a month or so that I think this is wrong and burdensome. They I cannot keep on trying to live life as a hermit. I interacts with folks on the street/ interacts at parks/ walks/ give tourists information but have no real friends and no family. I rather read then go out. I i Tera then Mimiialistily y. I have to walk/ bike to make sure I am okay back wise- kneewise . If I did not, my pain is worse. If it wasn’t for this, I would be reading all day. Pointing this out because a lot of folks isolates themselves for a lot of reasons. Hearing issues is one of the most dominant issue on the reasoning. We were the rock and rollers goi g to concerts and noise issues . Sorry for long bit

Jump to this post

@judysmayo
Hi,

First good luck on the gall bladder surgery but I don’t understand why you said Uber is not allowed or why you feel that having someone pick you up is burdensome and wrong. Having surgery is not a trivial thing and you sound like you don’t impose yourself on anyone. I agree that the cost of hearing aids is prohibitive and that hearing loss can be isolating. You said you interact with others when out in public which sounds to me like you are a social person at heart. Not having family around is unfortunate. May I suggest you join some sort of organization or gym or senior center ( not sure of your age) or volunteer in order to meet people. Putting yourself out there initially is not easy but gets easier over time. You don’t want to be a hermit….that’s a good start.

You walk and bike…that is great and maybe you can use that to your advantage…there are walking and biking clubs. A lot depends on where you live too. Here in Florida in my area there are way too many subdivisions and gated communities. If you don’t drive, that can be so isolating. I grew up in a city and moved to a vibrant urban community when I married and miss that here although I do have family very near. I joined a gym when we moved to where I am now and after I retired (gated community) and met new people who became friends over time. All my friends are hearing although I do attend monthly HHLA meetings.

It’s up to us to generally make the first move in establishing relationships and to do so in an upbeat way. I find that a sense of humor works best and anyone who can’t be bothered to learn how to speak or interact with me is not worth my time. Happily most people are kind and willing to engage. Nothing beats a big smile.

Regards from FL Mary

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