Distancing at home

Posted by ozma @ozma, May 5 9:46pm

Is it advisable to sleep together or in separate rooms with your spouse if there are no symptoms/ and whether or not they work in public. If other members of your home work essential jobs. Should the stay in there own rooms when home from work or is six feet a safe enough distance …with or without a face mask.

Liked by lioness, robbie1956

That’s a tough question to answer. My relatives who are doctors are staying separated from their families. I know 2 RNs who are sleeping and using separate bathrooms during this pandemic.
Every situation is different, what are your risk factors?
Funcountess

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@ozma Hello and welcome to Mayo Connect. We are a group of people sharing our journeys through a wide variety of health conditions, but we are not doctors and cannot offer medical advice. What we share is how we live and adapt. Along the way we try to share science based information and knowledge.

That said, most current advice says close contact with immediate members of your household is generally okay unless you (or one of them) is in a risk category, whether due to age or health conditions. Or unless someone has symptoms of illness (but remember some people seem to have the virus without showing symptoms) or has been closely exposed to someone who has the virus (like caring for an ill person, working for hours close to someone infected.)

So, sleeping with a partner who is also self-isolating (and taking proper precautions) would probably be okay. If you are not high risk, sleeping with someone who works but is not in a frontline job and takes precautions – probably okay. Sleeping with a partner who works in a frontline job, exposed repeatedly, even if careful – maybe – if you are not high risk.

Same answer with others in the household – you need to know they are using good judgment and taking proper precautions, otherwise they should minimize contact within the home – either stay in their rooms or a separate part of the house. And use a separate bathroom or sanitize between users, same with the kitchen. Some people seem to feel if it is okay to go to work, it is okay to socialize with friends during breaks or before or after work – I would class them as high risk and minimize contact if I was in a risk category.

I hope this helps. I will say, my daughters are nurses, many of their friends are also nurses or other first responders, they have mostly decided to remain in contact WITH their families, except those directly working in ER and ICU. But both of them have always had the policy of removing their work scrubs and washing up thoroughly immediately after work – long before Covid-19 came on the scene.
Sue

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@sueinmn

@ozma Hello and welcome to Mayo Connect. We are a group of people sharing our journeys through a wide variety of health conditions, but we are not doctors and cannot offer medical advice. What we share is how we live and adapt. Along the way we try to share science based information and knowledge.

That said, most current advice says close contact with immediate members of your household is generally okay unless you (or one of them) is in a risk category, whether due to age or health conditions. Or unless someone has symptoms of illness (but remember some people seem to have the virus without showing symptoms) or has been closely exposed to someone who has the virus (like caring for an ill person, working for hours close to someone infected.)

So, sleeping with a partner who is also self-isolating (and taking proper precautions) would probably be okay. If you are not high risk, sleeping with someone who works but is not in a frontline job and takes precautions – probably okay. Sleeping with a partner who works in a frontline job, exposed repeatedly, even if careful – maybe – if you are not high risk.

Same answer with others in the household – you need to know they are using good judgment and taking proper precautions, otherwise they should minimize contact within the home – either stay in their rooms or a separate part of the house. And use a separate bathroom or sanitize between users, same with the kitchen. Some people seem to feel if it is okay to go to work, it is okay to socialize with friends during breaks or before or after work – I would class them as high risk and minimize contact if I was in a risk category.

I hope this helps. I will say, my daughters are nurses, many of their friends are also nurses or other first responders, they have mostly decided to remain in contact WITH their families, except those directly working in ER and ICU. But both of them have always had the policy of removing their work scrubs and washing up thoroughly immediately after work – long before Covid-19 came on the scene.
Sue

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Thank you for your well phrased post.

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@vclove

Thank you for your well phrased post.

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@ozma @vclove I agree, the way Sue @sueinmn shows different scenarios is a great way to give examples. Welcome to Mayo Connect, to both of you!

Two questions I have for each of you. How did you find Mayo Connect? What are you practicing for social distancing in your home, if needed [due to at-risk persons or perhaps frontline worker]?

To see a wide variety of topics related to COVID-19, and living in these times with this challenge, you will find a lot of good reading in the COVID-19 group https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/covid-19/ We look forward to your input!
Ginger

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@sueinmn

@ozma Hello and welcome to Mayo Connect. We are a group of people sharing our journeys through a wide variety of health conditions, but we are not doctors and cannot offer medical advice. What we share is how we live and adapt. Along the way we try to share science based information and knowledge.

That said, most current advice says close contact with immediate members of your household is generally okay unless you (or one of them) is in a risk category, whether due to age or health conditions. Or unless someone has symptoms of illness (but remember some people seem to have the virus without showing symptoms) or has been closely exposed to someone who has the virus (like caring for an ill person, working for hours close to someone infected.)

So, sleeping with a partner who is also self-isolating (and taking proper precautions) would probably be okay. If you are not high risk, sleeping with someone who works but is not in a frontline job and takes precautions – probably okay. Sleeping with a partner who works in a frontline job, exposed repeatedly, even if careful – maybe – if you are not high risk.

Same answer with others in the household – you need to know they are using good judgment and taking proper precautions, otherwise they should minimize contact within the home – either stay in their rooms or a separate part of the house. And use a separate bathroom or sanitize between users, same with the kitchen. Some people seem to feel if it is okay to go to work, it is okay to socialize with friends during breaks or before or after work – I would class them as high risk and minimize contact if I was in a risk category.

I hope this helps. I will say, my daughters are nurses, many of their friends are also nurses or other first responders, they have mostly decided to remain in contact WITH their families, except those directly working in ER and ICU. But both of them have always had the policy of removing their work scrubs and washing up thoroughly immediately after work – long before Covid-19 came on the scene.
Sue

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Thank you your answer was very helpful. I appreciate you for your detailed answer. Prayers for you and your family. And all first responders.

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@sueinmn

@ozma Hello and welcome to Mayo Connect. We are a group of people sharing our journeys through a wide variety of health conditions, but we are not doctors and cannot offer medical advice. What we share is how we live and adapt. Along the way we try to share science based information and knowledge.

That said, most current advice says close contact with immediate members of your household is generally okay unless you (or one of them) is in a risk category, whether due to age or health conditions. Or unless someone has symptoms of illness (but remember some people seem to have the virus without showing symptoms) or has been closely exposed to someone who has the virus (like caring for an ill person, working for hours close to someone infected.)

So, sleeping with a partner who is also self-isolating (and taking proper precautions) would probably be okay. If you are not high risk, sleeping with someone who works but is not in a frontline job and takes precautions – probably okay. Sleeping with a partner who works in a frontline job, exposed repeatedly, even if careful – maybe – if you are not high risk.

Same answer with others in the household – you need to know they are using good judgment and taking proper precautions, otherwise they should minimize contact within the home – either stay in their rooms or a separate part of the house. And use a separate bathroom or sanitize between users, same with the kitchen. Some people seem to feel if it is okay to go to work, it is okay to socialize with friends during breaks or before or after work – I would class them as high risk and minimize contact if I was in a risk category.

I hope this helps. I will say, my daughters are nurses, many of their friends are also nurses or other first responders, they have mostly decided to remain in contact WITH their families, except those directly working in ER and ICU. But both of them have always had the policy of removing their work scrubs and washing up thoroughly immediately after work – long before Covid-19 came on the scene.
Sue

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Thank you for this information. As a person who is high risk, living with others who work in the community daily this was SO helpful!

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@gingerw

@ozma @vclove I agree, the way Sue @sueinmn shows different scenarios is a great way to give examples. Welcome to Mayo Connect, to both of you!

Two questions I have for each of you. How did you find Mayo Connect? What are you practicing for social distancing in your home, if needed [due to at-risk persons or perhaps frontline worker]?

To see a wide variety of topics related to COVID-19, and living in these times with this challenge, you will find a lot of good reading in the COVID-19 group https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/covid-19/ We look forward to your input!
Ginger

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I found Mayo Connect through the Mayo Clinic Health Letter. It's easy for me to practice social distancing. No others live in my home except for my cat, Tom. I am 11 days into my quarantine. Yesterday with my Doctor's permission I went to the Pharmacy and the Bank. The cat and I spent some time in the front yard. It was not difficult to social distance from the neighbors or those walking by.

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@vclove

I found Mayo Connect through the Mayo Clinic Health Letter. It's easy for me to practice social distancing. No others live in my home except for my cat, Tom. I am 11 days into my quarantine. Yesterday with my Doctor's permission I went to the Pharmacy and the Bank. The cat and I spent some time in the front yard. It was not difficult to social distance from the neighbors or those walking by.

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@vclove That is how i found Mayo Connect, also! Not to sound prejudiced, but it has really helped me! Has your cat gotten used to you being home so much? Ours is just loving it, and coincidentally, just in December she decided it was okay to get up on our laps to get petted, after rescuing her two years ago. How did you find your trip going out to do errands? I hope others were practicing social distancing and were masked!
Ginger

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We live as much by the guidelines as possible. My husband is working from home so we are following social distance guidelines. Our son lives at home and works as a construction carpenter. He works with guidelines. When he comes home he immediately undresses and hits the shower and stays in his living space upstairs. My Daughter works for U of M. In sterilization. She has an apartment and we only see her on nice days outside 6ft apart. Once a week. We all have senior parents to care for. We do so by taking turnes dropping meals and needs and supplies and talk by phone or face time in between. When we go for essentials we go about once a week. One of us goes. With gloves and a face mask. I have a routine I’d cleaning in the morning. Every day disinfecting surfaces. Change pillowcases twice a week. But should be done every day. And sheets every 10 days. But should be done more frequently. I also run an air filter I have dust allergy’s. I clean showers sinks and toilets every day. Floors once a week, but we take our shoes off at the back entrance.
When we have supper we are spaced apart appropriately and then I clean up with soap and water then spray surfaces with a barbicide spray…fun.😕 I stumbled upon mayo clinic google searching for questions I was not sure about.

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@ozma

We live as much by the guidelines as possible. My husband is working from home so we are following social distance guidelines. Our son lives at home and works as a construction carpenter. He works with guidelines. When he comes home he immediately undresses and hits the shower and stays in his living space upstairs. My Daughter works for U of M. In sterilization. She has an apartment and we only see her on nice days outside 6ft apart. Once a week. We all have senior parents to care for. We do so by taking turnes dropping meals and needs and supplies and talk by phone or face time in between. When we go for essentials we go about once a week. One of us goes. With gloves and a face mask. I have a routine I’d cleaning in the morning. Every day disinfecting surfaces. Change pillowcases twice a week. But should be done every day. And sheets every 10 days. But should be done more frequently. I also run an air filter I have dust allergy’s. I clean showers sinks and toilets every day. Floors once a week, but we take our shoes off at the back entrance.
When we have supper we are spaced apart appropriately and then I clean up with soap and water then spray surfaces with a barbicide spray…fun.😕 I stumbled upon mayo clinic google searching for questions I was not sure about.

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HI, @ozma Welcome to Connect.
It sounds as if you are doing everything possible to prevent the spread of COVID within your family. When you have supper are you dining with other family members who do leave your home? If not, then I am curious as to why you still separate from each other. Neither my husband nor I have left the house, other than neighborhood walks in our very spread out neighborhood, or walks on the HS track, also spread out, so I feel no need to distance from each other. I know my son and his wife are dealing with this though.
It is a difficult time for all, that's for sure. The estimates of when things will get better vary tremendously. We can only hope that the estimates that are for shorter times rather than longer, prove accurate.
JK

Liked by lioness

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My husband and I sit at the dinner table. My son eats at the counter faced in the opposed direction. But that’s usually how it rolls anyway. 😉

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@ozma …That is a topic that I have thought of myself ….. my wife and I eat together, sleep together, but generally have different sections of our home
to ‘hang out’ in…but it must be a complicated and difficult situation for some folks…..appreciate you bringing the topic up.

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@robbie1956 Yes, Robbie, it is an issue for many – I think of those living in close quarters – our many friends who are full-time RV'ers, city dwellers in tiny apartments, the homeless and near homeless living in shelters, hotel rooms, or several families to a house… How fortunate we are to have the luxury of space and the ability to stay home.
My friend has adult children who live at home and are working – they stay downstairs, Mom & Dad up. When they come up and use the kitchen, they sanitize carefully when done.
Sue

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@sueinmn

@robbie1956 Yes, Robbie, it is an issue for many – I think of those living in close quarters – our many friends who are full-time RV'ers, city dwellers in tiny apartments, the homeless and near homeless living in shelters, hotel rooms, or several families to a house… How fortunate we are to have the luxury of space and the ability to stay home.
My friend has adult children who live at home and are working – they stay downstairs, Mom & Dad up. When they come up and use the kitchen, they sanitize carefully when done.
Sue

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@sueinmn I really worry about those living in big cities, elbow to elbow with so many people, and no greenery around. No wonder they want the stay at home orders lifted! My son was telling me that he is so glad they moved to Crested Butte because they are surrounded by nature and their kids love it

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I too worry about and deeply sympathize with cooped-up city folks, separated from nature and greenery. I'm not at all sure I could stand that, and remain sane-ish.

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