Diet for diabetic and low oxalate requirements

Posted by jbrj04 @jbrj04, Feb 22, 2019

Seeking information on how to develop and maintain a diabetic diet with the restrictions of a low oxalate diet. Foods allowed seem to be in opposition to one another. Would appreciate suggestions, experiences, and how needs of both diets can be combined.
Thank you, jbrj04

Welcome @jbrj04 I'm glad you are here on Connect. My name is Carol, and I have diabetes 2 and kidney problems. I have had kidney stones for years and years, but I am a "new" diabetic of not quite three years. I understand your concern for what foods work for both problems. I have spent some time this morning after reading your post checking on oxalate foods, and though I am familiar with many, there were some on the list I did not know. I know it's just a preference, but many of the foods are acceptable on both lists. Maybe it is easier for me because I am accustomed to my choices. As a retired teacher, I always researched and took notes on index cards, so I find this an efficient way to plan grocery buying and menus. When I was diagnosed with diabetes, I made a stack of index cards and put them in meal groups: proteins, veggies, fruits, snacks, and sweets. This way I plan meals like playing cards. I choose a protein, veggies, and whatever else for weekly meals. If you do this, you can see there are many choices and not that many restrictions. Making the list or using index cards, however you decide to manage will become easier as you make some changes. I found that I do not have to have pasta forever. I may have it twice a year or chocolate. It takes some time to become accustomed to not having some things, but I found that most of the foods not allowed were ones I really didn't miss. Have you thought about seeing a dietician? If you want someone to help you plan, they know what you can do and can help you plan. Since I have both stones and diabetes 2, I can tell you it's a change, but it is not that much of a problem once you are used to it. I eat good meals and occasionally eat something on the "No" card. But check the numbers for how much causes problems. You can have oxalate foods and diabetic foods, as long as you have them in moderation. Does that sound doable? Let me know what you think. I'll look forward to hearing from you.
Carol

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@retiredteacher

Welcome @jbrj04 I'm glad you are here on Connect. My name is Carol, and I have diabetes 2 and kidney problems. I have had kidney stones for years and years, but I am a "new" diabetic of not quite three years. I understand your concern for what foods work for both problems. I have spent some time this morning after reading your post checking on oxalate foods, and though I am familiar with many, there were some on the list I did not know. I know it's just a preference, but many of the foods are acceptable on both lists. Maybe it is easier for me because I am accustomed to my choices. As a retired teacher, I always researched and took notes on index cards, so I find this an efficient way to plan grocery buying and menus. When I was diagnosed with diabetes, I made a stack of index cards and put them in meal groups: proteins, veggies, fruits, snacks, and sweets. This way I plan meals like playing cards. I choose a protein, veggies, and whatever else for weekly meals. If you do this, you can see there are many choices and not that many restrictions. Making the list or using index cards, however you decide to manage will become easier as you make some changes. I found that I do not have to have pasta forever. I may have it twice a year or chocolate. It takes some time to become accustomed to not having some things, but I found that most of the foods not allowed were ones I really didn't miss. Have you thought about seeing a dietician? If you want someone to help you plan, they know what you can do and can help you plan. Since I have both stones and diabetes 2, I can tell you it's a change, but it is not that much of a problem once you are used to it. I eat good meals and occasionally eat something on the "No" card. But check the numbers for how much causes problems. You can have oxalate foods and diabetic foods, as long as you have them in moderation. Does that sound doable? Let me know what you think. I'll look forward to hearing from you.
Carol

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Carol, thank you for your information. I like the idea of the index cards as a system of organizing. I have had diabetes since 2010 and struggled to maintain lower A1C's. Went on The Eat to Live Plan by Dr. Joel Fuhrman and in 6 months was able to stop the medication. When I went in to see the nephrologist, she was alarmed because the oxalate levels were so high. His diet advocates really healthy eating with lots of vegetables, nuts, fiber from plants sources and grains. It was so frustrating because I thought I had found a safe way to control the diabetes. With the oxalates most of the foods he recommended were sources of higher oxalates and not recommended. I have a metabolic syndrome which creates lactose intolerance, I do not digest protein well because of a lack of an enzyme to metabolize the proteins from meats. Discouraging to say the least. Thank you for sharing your journey. I will see if I can find ways to work this into meal planning. Continued success with your journey. jbrj

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@jbrj04

Carol, thank you for your information. I like the idea of the index cards as a system of organizing. I have had diabetes since 2010 and struggled to maintain lower A1C's. Went on The Eat to Live Plan by Dr. Joel Fuhrman and in 6 months was able to stop the medication. When I went in to see the nephrologist, she was alarmed because the oxalate levels were so high. His diet advocates really healthy eating with lots of vegetables, nuts, fiber from plants sources and grains. It was so frustrating because I thought I had found a safe way to control the diabetes. With the oxalates most of the foods he recommended were sources of higher oxalates and not recommended. I have a metabolic syndrome which creates lactose intolerance, I do not digest protein well because of a lack of an enzyme to metabolize the proteins from meats. Discouraging to say the least. Thank you for sharing your journey. I will see if I can find ways to work this into meal planning. Continued success with your journey. jbrj

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@jbrj04 I'm so glad to hear from you. I know we all search for the definitive answer when we're dealing with seemingly opposing forces. I am not familiar with the Fuhrman book; it seems that all these doctors and wannabe doctors and experts have books that will give all the answers. I do better checking the internet, especially the Mayo site and then seeing what my endocrinologist says too. I don't eat meats often; I prefer veggies. But my meat of choice is boneless, skinless chicken breasts or turkey breasts. I have a number of ways I prepare this meat that is very tasty. I do not digest red meat well, so I limit it to maybe once a week (3 oz.) and I also limit pork. I can do without meat, but protein is necessary for a healthy diet. Sometimes I get protein from eggs; those are easy to digest for me. Many of the veggies I saw on oxalate lists of foods to eat are also on the good foods for diabetes. It just takes some time to get it all sorted. I went to the oxalate list and checked my diabetes cards. If the veggies or fruit or whatever I was looking for was allowable in both instances. I wrote DO. That lets me know it's okay for both areas. If not, the card gets a D for diabetes or an O for oxalates. It takes time and research, but once you have your cards or lists, you can really prepare good food, and you'll find it's not so frustrating. I'm sure you can do this, and it will work—just check the numbers. I've been doing this for almost three years, and it certainly makes preparing meals so much easier. It helps my diabetes and my kidneys. Have you talked with a dietician? They can help you plan meals that satisfy both conditions. I'd like to know if you try it, and if you do, I will be happy that it works for you.
Carol

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@retiredteacher

Welcome @jbrj04 I'm glad you are here on Connect. My name is Carol, and I have diabetes 2 and kidney problems. I have had kidney stones for years and years, but I am a "new" diabetic of not quite three years. I understand your concern for what foods work for both problems. I have spent some time this morning after reading your post checking on oxalate foods, and though I am familiar with many, there were some on the list I did not know. I know it's just a preference, but many of the foods are acceptable on both lists. Maybe it is easier for me because I am accustomed to my choices. As a retired teacher, I always researched and took notes on index cards, so I find this an efficient way to plan grocery buying and menus. When I was diagnosed with diabetes, I made a stack of index cards and put them in meal groups: proteins, veggies, fruits, snacks, and sweets. This way I plan meals like playing cards. I choose a protein, veggies, and whatever else for weekly meals. If you do this, you can see there are many choices and not that many restrictions. Making the list or using index cards, however you decide to manage will become easier as you make some changes. I found that I do not have to have pasta forever. I may have it twice a year or chocolate. It takes some time to become accustomed to not having some things, but I found that most of the foods not allowed were ones I really didn't miss. Have you thought about seeing a dietician? If you want someone to help you plan, they know what you can do and can help you plan. Since I have both stones and diabetes 2, I can tell you it's a change, but it is not that much of a problem once you are used to it. I eat good meals and occasionally eat something on the "No" card. But check the numbers for how much causes problems. You can have oxalate foods and diabetic foods, as long as you have them in moderation. Does that sound doable? Let me know what you think. I'll look forward to hearing from you.
Carol

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Thanks for the suggestions of the index cards because I am getting frustrated. I am recently diagnosed with Type 2 and just now put on the oxalate diet. I seem to be a kidney stone factory.

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@denise1892 I understand "getting frustrated." It is hard to try to live a normal life and have to check everything because of diabetes and kidney stones. But, I am convinced that everyone has something they have to deal with. It certainly tests your mental toughness. I have been a Diabetic 2 for a little over three years, and I hate it more every day. This time of year is especially hard with all the Halloween treats and special dishes for Thanksgiving and Christmas. It's hard to say "No thank you." Sometimes, I allow myself one or two treats, and my blood goes up but I forgive myself and move on. The oxalate diet is not easy, but not impossible with the diabetes. It just means checking more carefully. Were you prediabetic before or is the diabetic diagnosis a surprise? I'll be glad to help any way I can, but I find researching on the internet the best way to get some answers if others don't have the same situation as I do. What was your A1C when you were diagnosed? Will you stay in touch if you need more help? If I've experienced it, I will be glad to help.
Carol

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@jbrj I've been looking through my list of members I want to follow up on, and I see that I haven't been in touch with you since February. I know you had a challenge with following a diabetic and oxalate diet. How is that going? Have you found a way to have the two problems be compatible with what you need? I know those two problems are not easy, but I hope you have discovered that you can eat foods that work for both. It is hard to spend so much time trying to work out a menu plan. It certainly would be easier if we had one source that tells every meal that is acceptable for both. Unfortunately, we have to make our own plan, and sometimes that doesn't work as well. I hope your lab numbers are in range and that you have a routine that is easier now than it was at first. I'd like to hear from you to see how you are doing.
Carol

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This has recently become a challenge for me as well. Kidney stones and NIDDM…. And because I have had Low Thyroid issues for years, the changes have caused my Thyroid to become even more sensitive, thus causing Cardiac palpatations…. if it isn't one issue, it's another!! Finding a Good balance is my new normal and trying to do that is stressful to say the least.

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@retiredteacher

Welcome @jbrj04 I'm glad you are here on Connect. My name is Carol, and I have diabetes 2 and kidney problems. I have had kidney stones for years and years, but I am a "new" diabetic of not quite three years. I understand your concern for what foods work for both problems. I have spent some time this morning after reading your post checking on oxalate foods, and though I am familiar with many, there were some on the list I did not know. I know it's just a preference, but many of the foods are acceptable on both lists. Maybe it is easier for me because I am accustomed to my choices. As a retired teacher, I always researched and took notes on index cards, so I find this an efficient way to plan grocery buying and menus. When I was diagnosed with diabetes, I made a stack of index cards and put them in meal groups: proteins, veggies, fruits, snacks, and sweets. This way I plan meals like playing cards. I choose a protein, veggies, and whatever else for weekly meals. If you do this, you can see there are many choices and not that many restrictions. Making the list or using index cards, however you decide to manage will become easier as you make some changes. I found that I do not have to have pasta forever. I may have it twice a year or chocolate. It takes some time to become accustomed to not having some things, but I found that most of the foods not allowed were ones I really didn't miss. Have you thought about seeing a dietician? If you want someone to help you plan, they know what you can do and can help you plan. Since I have both stones and diabetes 2, I can tell you it's a change, but it is not that much of a problem once you are used to it. I eat good meals and occasionally eat something on the "No" card. But check the numbers for how much causes problems. You can have oxalate foods and diabetic foods, as long as you have them in moderation. Does that sound doable? Let me know what you think. I'll look forward to hearing from you.
Carol

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I have had over 300 kidney stones since the 1980's and this is the first time i have heard of an oxalate diet. I have been a Type 2 diabete for a year plus stage 3 NonAlcholic liver cirrhosis and chronic kidney disease. Finding food to eat with these opposing diseases has been futile. If you could recommend some internet site's i sure would appreciate it.
Denny

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@denny2019 Welcome to Connect. I am Carol, a Volunteer Mentor and a retired teacher of 45 years. I have diabetes 2 and kidney stones, but not the hundreds you have had. Unfortunately, as I indicated in my post above, the diabetes diet and the oxalate diet are not friends. The only way I have found is to research the foods and see what the numbers are. The diabetes diet is much easier until oxalates are in the mix; that makes it difficult, but not impossible. As I suggested to @jbrj04 it's a time-consuming research to see if a food is okay for diabetes and for oxalates. Checking the ingredients is the only way I have found that works. As I suggested, I use index cards that help me so that I don't have to repeat the research for certain foods. Once I find something that works, I have a tendency to repeat it often rather than trying to discover something that requires a lot of time researching before I prepare a meal. Maybe some sessions with a dietician would give you more information. Have you seen a dietician? I hope you can find someone who can offer more suggestions.
Carol

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Hello Carol. I have taken your advice & have found a diabetes dietitian who will guide me along. Index cards are great to use and i plan on making a month long daily meal plan. I know it's ambitious, but will be worth it. Thanks very much.
Dennis

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@denny2019

Hello Carol. I have taken your advice & have found a diabetes dietitian who will guide me along. Index cards are great to use and i plan on making a month long daily meal plan. I know it's ambitious, but will be worth it. Thanks very much.
Dennis

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@denny2019 I am so glad you found a dietitian who can help. This is a tough problem to try to figure out what to eat when the diets are at odds. I am glad you found someone who can guide you and work with you to get a meal plan in place so that you don't have to stop and check everything. To have a month of meals is ambitious, but you will be happy when you've worked it out once it is completed. Also @jbrj04 and @ denise1892 have you tried a dietician? It sounds as if this may be the best step to deal with the conflicting diets.
Carol

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Hi I follow Trim Healthy Mama which has been successful for a lot of people who are type 1 and 2; and can be easily modified for any additional nutritional needs.

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