COVID-19 and risk for people with Diabetes & Diabetic Neuropathy

Posted by pearl3030 @pearl3030, Apr 28 8:16am

Does anyone know why diabetes is on the risk list for covid complications? I am wondering if people with neuropathy (a common affliction for those with Diabetes) are also at a higher risk for complications?

Hello @pearl3030, Welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. The Diabetes.org website has some information that I think answers your question.

How COVID-19 Impacts People with Diabetes: https://www.diabetes.org/coronavirus-covid-19/how-coronavirus-impacts-people-with-diabetes

Mayo Clinic News Network also has some informative and helpful articles and videos here if you are looking for additional information:
https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/category/covid-19/
May I ask how you found Mayo Clinic Connect (we are glad you found us!)?

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@johnbishop

Hello @pearl3030, Welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. The Diabetes.org website has some information that I think answers your question.

How COVID-19 Impacts People with Diabetes: https://www.diabetes.org/coronavirus-covid-19/how-coronavirus-impacts-people-with-diabetes

Mayo Clinic News Network also has some informative and helpful articles and videos here if you are looking for additional information:
https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/category/covid-19/
May I ask how you found Mayo Clinic Connect (we are glad you found us!)?

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Thanks, @johnbishop I had wondered about this also. The only thing I had seen was that people with diabetes are more apt to have heart conditions which can be problematic if they contract COVID. This article is more explanative.

I do not remember where I read this unfortunately, but I did read somewhere that although people who are on immunosuppressants are more apt to contract COVID, if they have it their outcome is not worse than people not on immunosuppressants.
This is from a small study in Italy:
https://www.hepmag.com/article/immunosuppressants-liver-transplant-recipients-may-increase-covid19-risk
There is still so much to be learned about COVID and much of what is published contradicts other published studies.
JK

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Thinking about diabetes and the corona virus, our basic health is affected by high sugar numbers, so some of us may not heal as fast or well as before the disease. Also, when you consider that diabetes can affect the hearing, the eyes, the mind, and can lead to Alzheimer's, it is no wonder that we can be sensitive to heart conditions and other potential killers as obesity, anxiety, and God knows what else. Then there is the pancreas, our liver, our muscles, our bones, and certainly we can expect complications from a virus. I struggle to keep up my health every day, and with blood sugar numbers close to 100 in the morning, I have less to worry about. My isolation keeps me from worrying about the virus for me, but I pray for others. My blood pressure is lower now.
So I am motivated to keep on my personal program for the best I can do for my body, and my mind. I do not consider myself a sick person, nor do I laugh about my diabetic condition as many of my friends do. My granddaughter keeps telling me my age is just a number. I am vulnerable, but careful. Dorisena

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@dorisena

Thinking about diabetes and the corona virus, our basic health is affected by high sugar numbers, so some of us may not heal as fast or well as before the disease. Also, when you consider that diabetes can affect the hearing, the eyes, the mind, and can lead to Alzheimer's, it is no wonder that we can be sensitive to heart conditions and other potential killers as obesity, anxiety, and God knows what else. Then there is the pancreas, our liver, our muscles, our bones, and certainly we can expect complications from a virus. I struggle to keep up my health every day, and with blood sugar numbers close to 100 in the morning, I have less to worry about. My isolation keeps me from worrying about the virus for me, but I pray for others. My blood pressure is lower now.
So I am motivated to keep on my personal program for the best I can do for my body, and my mind. I do not consider myself a sick person, nor do I laugh about my diabetic condition as many of my friends do. My granddaughter keeps telling me my age is just a number. I am vulnerable, but careful. Dorisena

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Thank you for dorisena. I try to take my numbers very seriously. They range from 95 to 110. I am trying my best to completely social distance myself except to walk. We do need the exercise.

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@johnbishop

Hello @pearl3030, Welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. The Diabetes.org website has some information that I think answers your question.

How COVID-19 Impacts People with Diabetes: https://www.diabetes.org/coronavirus-covid-19/how-coronavirus-impacts-people-with-diabetes

Mayo Clinic News Network also has some informative and helpful articles and videos here if you are looking for additional information:
https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/category/covid-19/
May I ask how you found Mayo Clinic Connect (we are glad you found us!)?

Jump to this post

That is helpful thank you. I found by searching online google for trying to understand more about what the stages of covid are for different types of patients as I have seen a lot in terms of the symptoms but not much has been in the media on what specifically happens to patients once they’ve been hospitalized aside from needing to go on ventilators. Yet recently saw something about blood clots, amputations, covid toes and that made me wonder more about how my 10 yo daughter who suffers from neuropathy/ethromyalgia would be effected if she contracts covid.

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@dorisena

Thinking about diabetes and the corona virus, our basic health is affected by high sugar numbers, so some of us may not heal as fast or well as before the disease. Also, when you consider that diabetes can affect the hearing, the eyes, the mind, and can lead to Alzheimer's, it is no wonder that we can be sensitive to heart conditions and other potential killers as obesity, anxiety, and God knows what else. Then there is the pancreas, our liver, our muscles, our bones, and certainly we can expect complications from a virus. I struggle to keep up my health every day, and with blood sugar numbers close to 100 in the morning, I have less to worry about. My isolation keeps me from worrying about the virus for me, but I pray for others. My blood pressure is lower now.
So I am motivated to keep on my personal program for the best I can do for my body, and my mind. I do not consider myself a sick person, nor do I laugh about my diabetic condition as many of my friends do. My granddaughter keeps telling me my age is just a number. I am vulnerable, but careful. Dorisena

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I’m sorry to hear that. Stay strong and thank you for sharing.

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@contentandwell

Thanks, @johnbishop I had wondered about this also. The only thing I had seen was that people with diabetes are more apt to have heart conditions which can be problematic if they contract COVID. This article is more explanative.

I do not remember where I read this unfortunately, but I did read somewhere that although people who are on immunosuppressants are more apt to contract COVID, if they have it their outcome is not worse than people not on immunosuppressants.
This is from a small study in Italy:
https://www.hepmag.com/article/immunosuppressants-liver-transplant-recipients-may-increase-covid19-risk
There is still so much to be learned about COVID and much of what is published contradicts other published studies.
JK

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Interesting piece. Ty!

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I have a 42-year-old daughter with Type1 (since age 9). I worry constantly about her, even if she gets a cold … but COVID?!? She’s on a continuous glucose monitor, and well controlled. She has 2 healthy children. She and her husband are ER nurses. She is home with the kids but he is still in the hospital setting. Careful as they are, nothing is foolproof. Anyone out there with Type 1? Sure could use a larger support system these days if only to handle my own anxiety! Thank you!

Liked by moonlightlady

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Hi @annedodrill44 We have a few active members that are living with Type 1 Diabetes. I have tagged them here. @bassman48, @cehunt57 and @2011panc Perhaps together you can share information you have come across and lend support.

Liked by annedodrill44

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Thank you so much Amanda!

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I have studied and worked on my type 2 diabetes for 13 years after watching my husband die from his many diseases. Before that, I suffered from low blood sugar and received no help from my doctor except to eat often and carry cheese. I learned from a friend of a friend how to eat and work on my stress level and even studied at the college level to finally get back to safe blood sugar levels. One textbook claimed I was mentally unbalanced, which I was when my blood sugar levels dropped too low. So I was surprised to be diagnosed with high blood sugar, although I was aware that I was not getting enough exercise for the calories I was eating. What I have never read is how did my body change so that I became diabetic and why can'/t I change it back so I do not have the disease anymore. Did eating cause the problem? Did my pancreas quit working? Is my insulin system dying? Why am I supposed to live with the problem the rest of my life? I understand symptoms but not cause. It is not like chicken pox. It is not in the air, I do not believe. A pill doesn't fix it. Dorisena

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@dorisena

I have studied and worked on my type 2 diabetes for 13 years after watching my husband die from his many diseases. Before that, I suffered from low blood sugar and received no help from my doctor except to eat often and carry cheese. I learned from a friend of a friend how to eat and work on my stress level and even studied at the college level to finally get back to safe blood sugar levels. One textbook claimed I was mentally unbalanced, which I was when my blood sugar levels dropped too low. So I was surprised to be diagnosed with high blood sugar, although I was aware that I was not getting enough exercise for the calories I was eating. What I have never read is how did my body change so that I became diabetic and why can'/t I change it back so I do not have the disease anymore. Did eating cause the problem? Did my pancreas quit working? Is my insulin system dying? Why am I supposed to live with the problem the rest of my life? I understand symptoms but not cause. It is not like chicken pox. It is not in the air, I do not believe. A pill doesn't fix it. Dorisena

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Hi @dorisena, I recently started on an intermittent fasting routine after watching a video by Dr. Jason Fung – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7nJgHBbEgsE. It has helped in my weight journey so far and I'm hoping it will lower some of my labs as I've always been in the pre-diabetic category. I also saw some interesting information to support what he said in the video.

Intermittent fasting: Surprising update: https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/intermittent-fasting-surprising-update-2018062914156

Pssst…and there are no pills involved!

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@johnbishop

Hi @dorisena, I recently started on an intermittent fasting routine after watching a video by Dr. Jason Fung – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7nJgHBbEgsE. It has helped in my weight journey so far and I'm hoping it will lower some of my labs as I've always been in the pre-diabetic category. I also saw some interesting information to support what he said in the video.

Intermittent fasting: Surprising update: https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/intermittent-fasting-surprising-update-2018062914156

Pssst…and there are no pills involved!

Jump to this post

Hey John, sorry to butt in but, I'm actually reading about the positive benefit intermittent fasting has on the brain in renewing neurons as well. Amazing. Good luck. I love that you're trying it!

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Hi @rwinney, Could you please be more specific about fasting. Maybe a link to your sources.
Thanks

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@jamesinsonoma and @rwinney there is also a free app you can download on your phone called Zero which will track the different types of intermittent fasting schedules for you. @LeeAase has a health journey blog that was really helpful getting me started with intermittent fasting…has different links/references in the blog entries.

I found the Dr. Jason Fung video link in this blog entry – Our 10 Weeks of Alternate Daily Fasting: https://social-media-university-global.org/2020/02/our-10-week-alternate-daily-fasting-experience/. You can find all of the blog entries here:

My Health Journey by @LeeAasehttps://social-media-university-global.org/my-health-journey/

Liked by Lee Aase, rwinney

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